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Basically I have this:

import random
variable1 = random.randint(13, 19)

And basically what that does is assign variable1 a random number between 13 and 19. Great.

But, what I want it to do is assign a different random number between 13 and 19 to that variable every time it is called. Is there anyway I can do this?

If I'm not being clear enough here's an example:

import random
variable1 = random.randint(13, 19)
print(variable1)
print(variable1)
print(variable1)

And the output I want would look something like this:

./script.py
15
19
13

So yeah, anyway I could do this in python? (More specifically python3. but the answer would probably be similar to a python2 answer)

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Look at the question guys. He wants to not repeat numbers. –  Ross Rogers Jan 6 '11 at 4:03

8 Answers 8

up vote 4 down vote accepted

This is close to what you want

>>> import random
>>> variable1 = lambda: random.randint(13, 19)
>>> print(variable1())
18
>>> print(variable1())
15
>>> print(variable1())
17
>>> 
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Thank you. This worked perfectly. Exactly what I wanted. –  woah113 Jan 6 '11 at 5:04
10  
You realise this is called... a function. –  Marcus Whybrow Jan 6 '11 at 5:07
1  
A what? I have yet to hear of this new discovery. –  Blender Jan 24 '11 at 21:57

Perhaps a silly question, but why not just use a function instead of a variable?

Or perhaps more inline with your variable paradigm, why not use a method on an object. The object can then be passed as a variable, and the method returns the new random number.

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In that specific example, there's a rather asinine way of doing it. print implicitly converts its argument into a string. You can overload that functionality:

class randomizer():
    def __str__(self):
        return str(random.randint(13, 19))

variable1 = randomizer()
print(variable1)
print(variable1)
print(variable1)
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Add something similar into __int__ and you're set :D –  TryPyPy Jan 6 '11 at 4:23
    
+1, it matches the OP better than using a function. Assuming the OP author knew what a function is and didn't want to use it for some reason. –  Marco83 Apr 19 '13 at 22:03

You mention the word "called", and in that way I think you have answered your own question. This is exactly the job of a function or method.

A variable is just a reference to an object. You could store an object in your variable which overrides the to string method in order to generate a random number, but this is still a method.

Ultimately what your asking for would be obfuscating what is really going on under the hood, and as a result would create less maintainable code, imho.


When you do variable1 = random.randint(13, 19), variable1 contains the immutable object "the number 13" (or some other number). By definition it cannot change without becoming another object. Instead you could fill your variable with an aforementioned mutable object allowing it to modify its "random number". Or you could just directly call a function.

Its simply a question of simplicity.

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use:

alist = range(13,20)  
random.shuffle(alist)  

Now you can loop through this in random order

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Why the down vote?? I think OP is just looking to generate non-repeating elements from a set. –  Gerrat Jan 6 '11 at 4:02

Why not skip the variable altogether? You can use the function inline too: print(random.randint(13, 19) + 1).

Try this, and see if it fits your needs ;)

print(random.randint(13, 19))
print(random.randint(13, 19))
print(random.randint(13, 19))
print(random.randint(13, 19))
print(random.randint(13, 19))

I can't see any other possibilities, so good luck!

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Perhaps I'm not understanding the question correctly, but couldn't you just do:

print(random.randint(13, 19))
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How about using random.sample for your task? It Chooses k unique random elements from a population sequence.

import random
v1,v2,v3 = random.sample(range(13,20),3)
print v1,v2,v3

Of course, I have given this for 3 variables, you could use it for n variables.

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