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I have a Windows Forms application that includes the form class (and its designer class), and a static class. I want to be able to hide the form by calling a method in the form class from the static class.

The hide method is as follows:

    internal static void HideController()
    {
        DialogResult dlgResult = 
            MessageBox.Show("Controller will now close.", "Closing...", 
                            MessageBoxButtons.OK, MessageBoxIcon.Warning);

        if (dlgResult == DialogResult.OK)
        {
            this.Hide();
        }
    }

The form is not static, therefore I keep running into the problem of 'this' not being valid in a static context. I would like to call the method like so:

    static UtilScenario()
    {
        _stkProgramId = ConfigurationManager.AppSettings.Get("stkProgramId");

        if (CheckIfLaunched())
        {
            InitAllFields();
        }
        else
        {
            frmUavController.HideController();
        }
    }

What should I do?

share|improve this question
    
Remove the static modifier from the HideController method and then you'll be able to use the this keyword. –  Josh Jan 6 '11 at 4:16
    
@Josh Einstein, Yes, but then how do I call the method statically? I want to refer to the already instantiated form object. –  wulfgar.pro Jan 6 '11 at 4:20
    
From your example it doesn't look like you are calling it statically. Anyhow, if possible, avoid using static methods that act on an instance of something. If that's not possible, then look around on SO for information about a "Singleton" design pattern. –  Josh Jan 6 '11 at 4:23

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can use the Form.ActiveForm static property to obtain a reference to the form. You will have to cast that to a frmUavController in order to call your HideController method (after removing the static modifier from it).

internal void HideController()
{
    DialogResult dlgResult = MessageBox.Show("Controller will now close.", "Closing...", 
        MessageBoxButtons.OK, MessageBoxIcon.Warning);

    if (dlgResult == DialogResult.OK)
    {
        this.Hide();
    }
}

static UtilScenario()
{
    _stkProgramId = ConfigurationManager.AppSettings.Get("stkProgramId");

    if (CheckIfLaunched())
    {
        InitAllFields();
    }
    else
    {
        // a safer cast is recommended
        ((frmUavController)Form.ActiveForm).HideController();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
why is the cast un-safe? –  wulfgar.pro Jan 6 '11 at 5:29
    
I guess he's referring to that you should do some checks whether Form.ActiveForm actually is a frmUavController or not. Otherwise you can end up with CastExceptions at runtime –  Pauli Østerø Jan 6 '11 at 5:42
    
@WolfgarPro It doesn't do type checking to ensure the cast is valid or have any error handling. Adding that protection now is recommended in case you add more forms down the road. –  Bill N Jan 6 '11 at 5:43

Try the following. Create a property,

public static Form frm { get; set; }

static void UtilScenario()
{
    HideController();
}

internal static void HideController()
{
    if (frm == null)
        return;
    DialogResult dlgResult = MessageBox.Show("Controller will now close.", "Closing...",
        MessageBoxButtons.OK, MessageBoxIcon.Warning);

    if (dlgResult == DialogResult.OK)
    {
        frm.Hide();
    }
}

And you can call it like:

public void button2_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    Form1.frm = this;
    Form1.HideController();
}
share|improve this answer
    
HideController is called in the static class, not the form class. The form class is not static. –  wulfgar.pro Jan 6 '11 at 5:06
    
check the edited code –  binil Jan 6 '11 at 5:40

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