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I have a solid understanding of most OO theory but the one thing that confuses me a lot is virtual destructors.

I thought that the destructor always gets called no matter what and for every object in the chain.

When are you meant to make them virtual and why?

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4  
See this: Virtual Destructor –  Naveen Jan 20 '09 at 13:04
15  
Every destructor down gets called no matter what. virtual makes sure it starts at the top instead of the middle. –  Mooing Duck Jun 29 '13 at 0:32
1  
related question: When should you not use virtual destructors? –  Eitan T Aug 4 '13 at 16:39

9 Answers 9

up vote 483 down vote accepted

Virtual destructors are useful when you can delete an instance of a derived class through a pointer to base class:

class Base 
{
    // some virtual methods
};

class Derived : public Base
{
    ~Derived()
    {
        // Do some important cleanup
    }
}

Here, you'll notice that I didn't declare Base's destructor to be virtual. Now, let's have a look at the following snippet:

Base *b = new Derived();
// use b
delete b; // Here's the problem!

Since Base's destructor is not virtual and b is a Base* pointing to a Derived object, delete b has undefined behaviour. In most implementations, the call to the destructor will be resolved like any non-virtual code, meaning that the destructor of the base class will be called but not the one of the derived class, resulting in resources leak.

To sum up, always make base classes' destructors virtual when they're meant to be manipulated polymorphically.

If you want to prevent the deletion of an instance through a base class pointer, you can make the base class destuctor protected and nonvirtual; by doing so, the compiler won't let you call delete on a base class pointer.

You can learn more about virtuality and virtual base class destructor in this article from Herb Sutter.

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17  
This would explain why i had massive leaks using a factory i made before. All makes sense now. Thanks –  Lodle Jan 20 '09 at 13:08
67  
Worth adding that to prevent deletion through a base class interface, make the destructor protected and non-virtual. –  workmad3 Jan 20 '09 at 13:18
    
That was the exception I was talking about, but you're right, it's worth mentioning. –  Luc Touraille Jan 20 '09 at 13:36
3  
No, it wouldn't. Void pointers don't know about destructors. –  Leon Timmermans Jan 20 '09 at 15:01
2  
No, it wouldn't work with a void*. The compiler knows nothing about what a void * points at. All it knows is that it's a memory location. You need to cast the pointer to a type to tell the compiler what's there. –  Rob K Jan 20 '09 at 15:02

Declare destructors virtual in polymorphic base classes. This is Item 7 in Scott Meyers' Effective C++. Meyers goes on to summarize that if a class has any virtual function, it should have a virtual destructor, and that classes not designed to be base classes or not designed to be used polymorphically should not declare virtual destructors.

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4  
+"If a class has any virtual function, it should have a virtual destructor, and that classes not designed to be base classes or not designed to be used polymorphically should not declare virtual destructors.": Are there cases in which it makes sense to break this rule? If not, would it make sense to have the compiler check this condition and issue an error is it is not satisfied? –  Giorgio May 6 '12 at 9:29
    
@Giorgio I don't know of any exceptions to the rule. But I wouldn't rate myself as a C++ expert, so you may want to post this as a separate question. A compiler warning (or a warning from a static analysis tool) makes sense to me. –  Bill the Lizard May 6 '12 at 13:08

A virtual constructor is not possible but virtual destructor is possible. Let us experiment....

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;
class base
{

public:
    base(){cout<<"Base Constructor Called\n";}
    ~base(){cout<<"Base Destructor called\n";}

};
class derived1:public base
{

public:
    derived1(){cout<<"Derived constructor called\n";}
    ~derived1(){cout<<"Derived destructor called\n";}

};
int main()
{

    base* b;
    b=new derived1;
    delete b;

}

The above code output the following....

Base Constructor Called
Derived constructor called
Base Destructor called

The construction of derived object follow the construction rule but when we delete the "b" pointer(base pointer) we have found that only the base destructor is call.But this must not be happened. To do the appropriate thing we have to make the base destructor virtual. Now let see what happen in the following ...

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;
class base
{

public:
    base(){cout<<"Base Constructor Called\n";}
    virtual ~base(){cout<<"Base Destructor called\n";}

};
class derived1:public base
{

public:
    derived1(){cout<<"Derived constructor called\n";}
    ~derived1(){cout<<"Derived destructor called\n";}

};
int main()
{

    base* b;
    b=new derived1;
    delete b;

}

the output changed as following

Base Constructor Called
Derived constructor called
Derived destructor called
Base Destructor called

So the destruction of base pointer(which take an allocation on derived object!) follow the destruction rule i.e first the derived then the base. On the other hand for constructor there are nothing like virtual constructor. Thanks

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What do you mean by "Virtual constructor is not not possible"? Are you saying virtual constructors cannot be done? That simply isn't true. –  Murkantilism Apr 9 '13 at 14:00
    
" virtual constructor is not possible" means you need not write virtual constructor by your own. Construction of derived object must follow the chain of construction from derived to base. So you need not write the virtual keyword for your constructor. Thanks –  Tunvir Rahman Tusher Apr 19 '13 at 6:50
    
@Murkantilism, "virtual constructors cannot be done" is true indeed. A constructor cannot be marked virtual. –  cmeub Apr 21 '13 at 20:09
1  
@cmeub, But there is an idiom to achieve what you would want from a virtual constructor. See parashift.com/c++-faq-lite/virtual-ctors.html –  cape1232 Oct 3 '13 at 12:58

Also be aware that deleting a base class pointer when there is no virtual destructor will result in undefined behavior. Something that I learned just recently:

http://stackoverflow.com/questions/408196/how-should-overriding-delete-in-c-behave

I've been using C++ for years and I still manage to hang myself.

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Make the destructor virtual whenever your class is polymorphic.

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I like to think about interfaces and implementations of interfaces. In C++ speak interface is pure virtual class. Destructor is part of the interface and expected to implemented. Therefore destructor should be pure virtual. How about constructor? Constructor is actually not part of the interface because object is always instantiated explicitly.

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4  
How does this improve on the already accepted answer? –  cale_b Nov 8 '12 at 16:50
1  
It's a different perspective on the same question. If we think in terms of interfaces instead of base class vs derived class then it's natural conclusion: if it's a part of the interface than make it virtual. If it's not don't. –  Dragan Ostojic Nov 9 '12 at 18:58
1  
+1 for stating the similarity of the OO concept of interface and a C++ pure virtual class. Regarding destructor is expected to be implemented: that is often unnecessary. Unless a class is managing a resource such as raw dynamically allocated memory (e.g., not via a smart pointer), a file handle or a database handle, using the default destructor created by the compiler is fine in derived classes. And note that if a destructor (or any function) is declared virtual in a base class, it is automatically virtual in a derived class, even if it is not declared so. –  DavidRR Jul 11 '13 at 13:22

What is a virtual destructor or how to use virtual destructor

A class destructor is a function with same name of the class preceding with ~ that will reallocate the memory that is allocated by the class. Why we need a virtual destructor

See the following sample with some virtual functions

The sample also tell how you can convert a letter to upper or lower

#include "stdafx.h"
#include<iostream>
using namespace std;
// program to convert the lower to upper orlower
class convertch
{
public:
  //void convertch(){};
  virtual char* convertChar() = 0;
  ~convertch(){};
};

class MakeLower :public convertch
{
public:
  MakeLower(char *passLetter)
  {
    tolower = true;
    Letter = new char[30];
    strcpy(Letter, passLetter);
  }

  virtual ~MakeLower()
  {
    cout<< "called ~MakeLower()"<<"\n";
    delete[] Letter;
  }

  char* convertChar()
  {
    size_t len = strlen(Letter);
    for(int i= 0;i<len;i++)
      Letter[i] = Letter[i] + 32;
    return Letter;
  }

private:
  char *Letter;
  bool tolower;
};

class MakeUpper : public convertch
{
public:
  MakeUpper(char *passLetter)
  {
    Letter = new char[30];
    toupper = true;
    strcpy(Letter, passLetter);
  }

  char* convertChar()
  {   
    size_t len = strlen(Letter);
    for(int i= 0;i<len;i++)
      Letter[i] = Letter[i] - 32;
    return Letter;
  }

  virtual ~MakeUpper()
  {
    cout<< "called ~MakeUpper()"<<"\n";
    delete Letter;
  }

private:
  char *Letter;
  bool toupper;
};


int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
{
  convertch *makeupper = new MakeUpper("hai"); 
  cout<< "Eneterd : hai = " <<makeupper->convertChar()<<" ";     
  delete makeupper;
  convertch *makelower = new MakeLower("HAI");;
  cout<<"Eneterd : HAI = " <<makelower->convertChar()<<" "; 
  delete makelower;
  return 0;
}

From the above sample you can see that the destructor for both MakeUpper and MakeLower class is not called.

See the next sample with the virtual destructor

#include "stdafx.h"
#include<iostream>

using namespace std;
// program to convert the lower to upper orlower
class convertch
{
public:
//void convertch(){};
virtual char* convertChar() = 0;
virtual ~convertch(){}; // defined the virtual destructor

};
class MakeLower :public convertch
{
public:
MakeLower(char *passLetter)
{
tolower = true;
Letter = new char[30];
strcpy(Letter, passLetter);
}
virtual ~MakeLower()
{
cout<< "called ~MakeLower()"<<"\n";
      delete[] Letter;
}
char* convertChar()
{
size_t len = strlen(Letter);
for(int i= 0;i<len;i++)
{
Letter[i] = Letter[i] + 32;

}

return Letter;
}

private:
char *Letter;
bool tolower;

};
class MakeUpper : public convertch
{
public:
MakeUpper(char *passLetter)
{
Letter = new char[30];
toupper = true;
strcpy(Letter, passLetter);
}
char* convertChar()
{

size_t len = strlen(Letter);
for(int i= 0;i<len;i++)
{
Letter[i] = Letter[i] - 32;
}
return Letter;
}
virtual ~MakeUpper()
{
      cout<< "called ~MakeUpper()"<<"\n";
delete Letter;
}
private:
char *Letter;
bool toupper;
};


int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
{

convertch *makeupper = new MakeUpper("hai");

cout<< "Eneterd : hai = " <<makeupper->convertChar()<<" \n";

delete makeupper;
convertch *makelower = new MakeLower("HAI");;
cout<<"Eneterd : HAI = " <<makelower->convertChar()<<"\n ";


delete makelower;
return 0;
}

The virtual destructor will call explicitly the most derived run time destructor of class so that it will be able to clear the object in a proper way.

Or visit the lnk

http://www.programminggallery.com/article_details.php?article_id=138

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I think the core of this question is about virtual and Polymorphism,not the destructor,here is a clearer example:

class A
{
  public:
  A() {}
  virtual void foo()
    {
      cout << "This is A." << endl;
    }
};

class B : public A
{
  public:
  B() {}
  void foo()
    {
      cout << "This is B." << endl;
    }
};

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
    A *a = new B();
    a->foo();
    if(a != NULL)
    delete a;
    return 0;
}

Will print out:

This is B.

Without virtual, print out:

This is A.

And now you should understood when to use virtual destructors...

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when you need to call derived class destructor from base class. you need to declare virtual base class destructor in base class.

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protected by Mysticial Aug 12 '13 at 22:33

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