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void foo(void **Pointer);

int main ()
{
    int *IntPtr;

    foo(&((void*)IntPtr));
}

Why do I get an error?

error: lvalue required as unary ‘&’ operand

Thanks

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5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

(void*) is not an lvalue, it is kind of a casting operator, you need to have the ampersand to the immediate left of the variable (lvalue). This should be right:

foo(((void**)&IntPtr));
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Don't need the cast to void* –  crashmstr Jan 20 '09 at 13:15
1  
crashmstr: It's required to explicitly cast to void** in C++. If it was a void* you wouldn't need a cast, however it's not void*, it's void**. –  Mehrdad Afshari Jan 20 '09 at 13:17
    
Ah, sorry! I have not had to work with void pointers in a while :) –  crashmstr Jan 20 '09 at 13:54
    
well, casting to void** is like casting to int** in that regard. void** is nothing special. the questioner should use void* –  Johannes Schaub - litb Jan 22 '09 at 7:55
    
@Johannes, except that foo takes a void** and not a void* which is strictly speaking a type mismatch. And also, it helps to understand the flow, there is little gain of speaking of a pointer-to-a-pointer as a pointer when readability comes into concern. –  Tobias Wärre Jun 1 '11 at 8:36
void foo(void **Pointer);

int main ()
{
    int *IntPtr;

    foo((void**)&IntPtr);
}
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When you do

(void*)IntPtr

you create a temporary variable, which is only an rvalue, and so can't be dereferenced.

What you need to do is:

int main()
{
  int* IntPtr;
  void* VoidPtr = (void*)IntPtr;
  foo(&VoidPtr);
}

or equivalent

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However, it is interesting to note that every modification made on Pointer in foo will only affect VoidPtr and not IntPtr (since I guess it was the aim of the OP). –  Luc Touraille Jan 20 '09 at 13:47
    
Yeah, this solution isn't right. You're only copying the (uninitialized) value of IntPtr to VoidPtr in the assignment. You're not making VoidPtr point to IntPtr. You want to do void* VoidPtr = (void*)(&IntPtr); –  Rob K Jan 20 '09 at 14:55
    
That will not work as expected. You need to add the last step of copying the conetent back from VoidPtr into IntPtr –  Loki Astari Jan 20 '09 at 16:37

More C++ style:

foo( reinterpret_cast< void** >( IntPtr ) );

But remember, according to Standard such a cast is implementation specific. Standard gives no guarantees about behavior of such cast.

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1  
That should be "foo( reinterpret_cast< void** >( &IntPtr ) )" –  Darron Jan 20 '09 at 14:40

As others point out, you have the order of the cast and the & wrong. But why do you use void** at all? That means that you accept a pointer to a void pointer. But that's not at all what you want. Just make the parameter a void*, and it will accept any pointer to some object:

void foo(void*);

int main () {
    int *IntPtr;
    foo(&IntPtr);
    assert(IntPtr == NULL);
}

That's what void* is for. Later, cast it back using static_cast. That's a quite restrictive cast, that doesn't allow dangerous variants, unlike the C style cast (type):

void foo(void* p) {
    int** pint = static_cast<int**>(p);
    *pint = NULL;
}

If the function takes pointers to void*, then that function can't accept pointers to int*. But if the function accepts either or, then the function should accept void*, and you should cast to the proper type inside the function. Maybe paste what you really want to do, we can help you better then. C++ has some good tools available, including templates and overloading, both of which sound helpful in this case.

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I use void** because I have an array of void pointers and the function returns one of the pointers inside void** argument. –  jackhab Jan 22 '09 at 7:44
    
you have a int pointer in your question not an array of void pointers, though. –  Johannes Schaub - litb Feb 18 '09 at 7:08

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