Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

What is the difference between new operator and Class.forName(...).getInstance()? Both of them create instances of a class, and I'm not sure what the difference is between them.

share|improve this question

8 Answers 8

up vote 16 down vote accepted

The new operator creates a new object of a type that's known statically (at compile-time) and can call any constructor on the object you're trying to create. It's the preferred way of creating an object - it's fast, optimized, and the JVM does lots of aggressive optimizations on it.

Class.forName().getInstance() is a dynamic construct that looks up a class with a specific name. It's slower than using new because the type of object can't be hardcoded into the bytecode, and because the JVM might have to do permissions checking to ensure that you have the authority to create an object. It's also partially unsafe because it always uses a zero-argument constructor, and if the object you're trying to create doesn't have a nullary constructor it throws an exception.

In short, use new if you know at compile-time what the type of the object is that you want to create. Use Class.forName().getInstance() if you don't know what type of object you'll be making.

share|improve this answer
1  
Its a popular Interview question, & this is a great answer... thanks –  Soumyadip Das Aug 6 '12 at 10:49

Class.forName can only call the default constructor (with no parameters) and class name can be provided during runtime e.g. the db-driver name read from a configuration file.

share|improve this answer
    
This is not true you can get constructors that require arguments and use them to instantiate an object through the reflection api. However the newInstance method specifically calls the no-arg constructor and requires that it be visible and accessable. templatetypedef's answer is the most complete/correct and informative. –  LINEMAN78 Jan 6 '11 at 6:46

Class.forName will do a lookup to find the Class object for YourClass.

Using the new operator should be the same as YourClass.class.getInstance().

share|improve this answer

The major difference is Class.forName('your class name').getInstance() is dynamic as type need not be hard coded into the code.

share|improve this answer

While both effectively do the same thing, you should use the new operator instead of doing Class.forName('class').getInstance(). The latter uses the reflection API to lookup the class at runtime. By using the new operator, the VM will know beforehand that you want to use that class and thus be more efficient.

share|improve this answer

Class.forName('your class name').getInstance() is useful if you need to instantiate classes dynamically, because you don't have to hardcode the classname to create an object.

Imagine a scenario where you load classes dynamically from a remote source. You will know their names but can't import them at compile time. In this case you can't use new to create new instances. That's (one reason) why Java offers the getInstance() method.

share|improve this answer

Class.forName('myClass').getInstance() loads the class if not already loaded. Here it calls the initial constructor and only executes the static part of the constructor.

new operator is used to initialize new objects.

You can create many instances from both the new operator and Class.forName() difference is the 2nd time you create a newInstance() static blocks will not get initialized.

A good example of Class.forName('myClass).getInstance() is the JDBC Driver Class.forName("com.mysql.JDBC.Driver").getInstance()

share|improve this answer
    
What if I use Class<myClass> inst1 = (Class<myClass>)Class.forName('myClass).getInstance()...... Class<myClass> inst2 = (Class<myClass>)Class.forName('myClass).getInstance().............. This will make multiple instances right. –  i2ijeya Jan 6 '11 at 7:08
1  
Well I don't find a method getInstance(). Do You? –  Nips Jan 6 '11 at 7:26
    
corrected....... –  i2ijeya Jan 6 '11 at 7:44

If no zero argument constructor of an object it will also create an object and it will not throw any exception, please find the below code snippets.

try {
    Class o = Class.forName("com.myCompany.MyClass");

    Constructor m = o.getConstructor(Integer.class,String.class);
    m.newInstance(new Integer(0),new String(""));

} catch (ClassNotFoundException e) {
    // TODO Auto-generated catch block
    e.printStackTrace();
} catch (InstantiationException e) {
    // TODO Auto-generated catch block
    e.printStackTrace();
} catch (IllegalAccessException e) {
    // TODO Auto-generated catch block
    e.printStackTrace();
} catch (SecurityException e) {
    // TODO Auto-generated catch block
    e.printStackTrace();
} catch (NoSuchMethodException e) {
    // TODO Auto-generated catch block
    e.printStackTrace();
} catch (IllegalArgumentException e) {
    // TODO Auto-generated catch block
    e.printStackTrace();
} catch (InvocationTargetException e) {
    // TODO Auto-generated catch block
    e.printStackTrace();
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.