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I have a Map

Map<Integer, List<Object>> entireData;

Now to this I'm adding some data using putAll like

entireData.putAll(someData);

where someData returns Map<Integer, List<Object>>

Now, I have another line which says

entireData.putAll(someMoreData);

which also returns Map<Integer, List<Object>>, but by doing this it over-writes the content of the existing entireData, how do I append?

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5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

First line of the Java Map Class Reference:

An object that maps keys to values. A map cannot contain duplicate keys; each key can map to at most one value.

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true, i agree, the key values are different here though –  Vivek Jan 6 '11 at 9:29
1  
Hmmm, that's not supposed to happen! putAll() is the same as calling put() for all items in the source collection. –  trojanfoe Jan 6 '11 at 9:32
    
you comment actually made me look at my code again and that's when I realized that my previous day code change had caused the key values to get reset :(. –  Vivek Jan 6 '11 at 9:37
2  
This doesn't really answer your question though, you asked about appending and you got a bunch of legitimate answers. –  sjr Jan 6 '11 at 9:41
    
@sjr Those are the SO rules: if you ask the question, you can accept any answer, whether it's correct or not –  Sean Patrick Floyd Jan 6 '11 at 9:54

You want a Multimap from Google Guava. Rewriting your example with Guava Multimap:

ListMultimap<Integer, Object> entireData = ArrayListMultimap.create();

entireData.get(key) returns a List<Object>. putAll will not override old keys but will append the values of those keys to the existing values. This is also much nicer than dealing with initializing the List instances yourself.

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Time to Guava answer ... about 7 minutes –  Gareth Davis Jan 6 '11 at 9:32
    
There is a reason it's the best collections library out there! –  sjr Jan 6 '11 at 9:33
for (Integer key : someMoreData.keySet())
{
    if (entireData.containsKey(key))
    {
        entireData.get(key).addAll(someMoreData.get(key));
    }
    else
    {
        entireData.put(key, someMoreData.get(key));
    }
}
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Yep, this kind of code is exactly the thing you want a Multimap implementation for. –  sjr Jan 6 '11 at 9:31
1  
+1 most direct answer –  Gareth Davis Jan 6 '11 at 9:31

Keys are unique. If someMoreData has a key same as already existing key in entireData the value i.e. list of object will be overwritten.

However you can loop in someMoreData and append for keys that exists in entireData like

 for(Integer key: someMoreData.keySet()){
       if(entireData.get(key)!=null)
           entireData.get(key).addAll(someMoreData.get(key));
       else
           entireData.put(key,someMoreData.get(key));
 }
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Per default, Java Maps map one key to one value, as trojanfoe writes. If that is not sufficient to your needs, you need a Multi-Map implementation (A Map that maps from a key to a collection of values).

The most popular versions can be found in two open source Frameworks, Google Guava and Apache Commons / Collections.

Guava Example:

final Multimap<Integer, String> mmap =
    Multimaps.newSetMultimap(
        Maps.<Integer, Collection<String>> newHashMap(),
        new Supplier<Set<String>>(){

            @Override
            public Set<String> get(){
                return Sets.newHashSet();
            }
        });
mmap.put(1, "foo");
mmap.put(1, "bar");
System.out.println(mmap.get(1));

Output:

[foo, bar]

Commons Collections Example:

final MultiMap mmap = new MultiHashMap();
mmap.put(1, "foo");
mmap.put(1, "bar");
System.out.println(mmap.get(1));

Output:

[foo, bar]

As you can see, the Commons Collections version is a lot simpler, but it's also less powerful, and in the current version it doesn't support Java 1.5 generics. So I'd go with Guava.

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You can instantiate a Guava Multimap much more simply using one of Multimaps.new[(Linked?Hash)|Tree]Multimap.create() (ok, maybe that "regex" isn't perfect ;-) –  Matt Ball Apr 26 '11 at 18:16
    
...at any rate, +1 for demonstrating how to get the generics right with newSetMultimap(Maps.newHashMap(), ...) which is what I needed. –  Matt Ball Apr 26 '11 at 18:25

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