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I have a really strange enum bug in Java.

for(Answer ans : assessmentResult.getAnswersAsList()) { //originally stored in a table
    //AnswerStatus stat = ans.getStatus();
    if (ans.getStatus() == AnswerStatus.NOT_ASSESSED) {
        assessed = false;
    }
}

An answer is an answer to a question on a test. An assessment result is the result a student gets on a test (this includes a collection of answers).

I've debugged the above code, and ans.getStatus() returns AnswerStatus.ASSESSED. Still, the if line returns true, and assessed is set to false.

But, the thing I think is most strange; When I declare the AnswerStatus stat variable, it works, even if I don't use the stat variable in the if test. Could someone tell me what is going on?.

I've read something about enum bugs in serialization/RMI-IIOP but I don't use that here. The enum AnswerStatus can be ASSESSED or NOT_ASSESSED.

The getStatus method in class Answer just returns the status, nothing else.

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1  
Can you post a SSCCE? mindprod.com/jgloss/sscce.html –  Joachim Sauer Jan 20 '09 at 14:05
    
Yup, we'll have to see this happen to get anywhere with it. –  Jon Skeet Jan 20 '09 at 14:09

4 Answers 4

I've debugged the above code, and ans.getStatus() returns AnswerStatus.ASSESSED. Still, the if line returns true, and assessed is set to false.

But, the thing I think is most strange; When I declare the AnswerStatus stat variable, it works, even if I don't use the stat variable in the if test. Could someone tell me what is going on?.

This sounds like the getStatus() method does not always return the same result - how is it implemented?

BTW, what's the point in having an enum with the values ASSESSED, and NOT_ASSESSED? Why not use a boolean isAssessed()?

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I believe it is considered clearer and more extensible to use an enum for something like this. –  ColinD Jan 20 '09 at 14:25
1  
@Colin: Not if it doesn't work ;) If there are only two possible states and one state is the logical negation of the other, a boolean is simpler. –  Dan Dyer Jan 20 '09 at 14:45
    
The reason is that it is not clear yet if these are the only statuses for the answer. –  Yngve Sneen Lindal Jan 20 '09 at 15:49
1  
boolean is clearer for something is 2-state. By using an enum it's essentially 3-state; ASSESSED, NOT_ASSESSED and null. –  Steve Kuo Jan 20 '09 at 17:56
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Solved.

It was the NetBeans debugger that tricked me. It does not pass the if test (although NetBeans says that).

Sorry for the inconvenience :-)

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What happens if you use .equals instead of ==?

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That shouldn't change anything. Enums are defined to have unique identity exactly so that you can use "==" to test for equality. –  Joachim Sauer Jan 20 '09 at 14:14
    
taken from Enum.java : public final boolean equals(Object other) { return this==other; } so it won't change anything! –  romaintaz Jan 20 '09 at 14:26
    
It can be different. For example, if one of the enum objects is received via IIOP it will be different from the constant object on the local machine. This situation can be avoided by implementing a readResolve method. –  Dan Dyer Jan 20 '09 at 14:43
    
Dan: are you sure that's still true for Java 5 enums? As far as I know that was only a problem when implementing your own enums in pre-Java 5. –  Joachim Sauer Jan 20 '09 at 14:47
    
It happened to me with Java 5. See bugs.sun.com/bugdatabase/view_bug.do?bug_id=6277781 –  Dan Dyer Jan 20 '09 at 14:50

No answer to your question but a suggestion:

It's always better to place the fix enum value in the first place in the compare statement and the variable part in the second place. Because, if in any circumstance the variable part delivers NULL you won't get a NullPointerException.

In your example it will look like this

...
if (AnswerStatus.NOT_ASSESSED == ans.getStatus())
...

MISTAKE:

Of course I make a mistake and mixed two things with each other. If you use the equals method to compare a fixed enum value with a variable containing this enum it's good to compare the constant enum value with the variable and not vic versa. For example:

write

if (AnswerStatus.NOT_ASSESSED.equals(ans.getStatus()))

instead of

if (ans.getStatus().equals(AnswerStatus.NOT_ASSESSED))

because, this could harm a NullPointerException if ans.getStatus() == null.

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null==something will not result in a null pointer exception. –  Steve Kuo Jan 20 '09 at 17:53
    
You are right. Thanks. –  Goran Martinic Jan 21 '09 at 7:34
    
You're thinking of something like "Some constant".equals(someVariable) or someConstant.equals(someVariable) –  Scott Stanchfield Jan 23 '09 at 22:49

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