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I know of two methods of setting a default parameter, but I would like to know what the preferred method is.

function Foo(par1, par2)
{
    if(par2 == null)
        par2 = "my default"
}

or

function Foo(par1, par2)
{
    par2 = par2 || "my default"
}

or is there a better way than either of these?

EDIT:

I would also like to know how others handle multiple optional parameters such as this: We have several functions like this in internal libraries (I think they're pretty ugly).

function Foo(par1, par2, par3)
{
    if(par2 == null)
        par2 = "my default"
    if(par3 == null)
        par3 = "my default"
    // Do something
}

And to call it:

Foo("Parameter one",null,true)
share|improve this question

11 Answers 11

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Personally I think the second form is just outright cleaner and more readable, certainly moreso than sergey's arguments inspection - though that can have it's place - but I prefer to pass extensible objects for args than have to maintain arg signatures.

e.g.

function Foo(myArgs)
{
    myArgs.par1 = myArgs.par1 || "my default"
    myArgs.par2 = myArgs.par2 || "my default"
}
share|improve this answer
    
And what about if your argument represents a falsy value? – Pablo Cabrera Jan 21 '09 at 11:00
    
Good question. I'd use a ternary similar to jishi's where it mattered - but mostly I find falsys are the default values, or are questionable values to pass at all. Bit unsure why I got the accepted on this one tbh, as I was really extending other correct answers with the object arg technique :) – annakata Jan 21 '09 at 11:29
    
No need to define a myArgs variable. There already is an internal arguments variable: See section 10.1.8 in ecma-international.org/publications/files/ECMA-ST/Ecma-262.pdf – some Jan 21 '09 at 17:47
    
@some - I'm well aware of that, but creating your own class gives you centralised reusable control over the data, giving you cheap validation, defaults, something approaching type-safety if you wish, and improves readability. By comparison the arguments var is really a rather obfuscated and clunky. – annakata Jan 21 '09 at 20:08
    
oh and further to that - arguments[n] is hardly the same as myArgs.foo – annakata Jan 21 '09 at 20:12

first one is actually wrong, since they would be undefined, not null.

par2 !== null would return true for this case.

since javascript, if loosely compared, compare null, undefined, false to the same value, I would suggest checking explicitly for an undefined value.

if (par2 !== undefined)
        par2 = "my default";

or

    par2 = par2 !== undefined ? par2 : "my default";

This will allow you to pass on values like false or null.

However, your second approach is convenient, but only in the case you know that you would never pass false or null.

share|improve this answer
    
Good point! At least someone did it right. – Gumbo Jan 20 '09 at 14:24
    
Asker is using ==, not ===. So first example is actually not wrong. – Crescent Fresh Jan 20 '09 at 14:43
    
It would work, but it's wrong in the sense that he doesn't know what he is actually matching. – jishi Jan 20 '09 at 16:51

A better and more reliable approach would be:

1) verify amount of arguments passed (imagine you wanted to allow undefined value to be passed in, or null, like in the case of DOM insertBefore function), and only after that try and set their values if ommited:

function Foo(par1, par2)
{
    if (arguments.length < 2)
        par2 = "my default"
    else
    if (arguments.length < 3)
        par3 = "my default"
}

2) or, if you want to disallow passing undefined, include it in the construction:

function Foo(par1, par2)
{
    if (arguments.length < 2 && par2 === undefined)
        par2 = "my default"
    else
    if (arguments.length < 3 && par3 === undefined)
        par3 = "my default"

}

3) or, if you want to disallow passing null, include it in the construction:

function Foo(par1, par2)
{
    if (arguments.length < 2 && (par2 === undefined || par2 === null))
        par2 = "my default"
    else
    if (arguments.length < 3 && (par3 === undefined || par3 === null))
        par4 = "my default"
}

BTW: I would recommend avoiding using function overloading, in reality it is hardly necessary.

share|improve this answer
    
Nice if your function indeed accepts, null, undefined, 0, '' as params – Pim Jager Jan 20 '09 at 14:19
    
Pim, the question was in general, there were no details on the values, right? – Sergey Ilinsky Jan 20 '09 at 14:20
    
It wasn't criticism. I was just saying that this is something which you don't really need if your function doesn't want those values as arguments. (Also I upvoted your answer because it really is a good answer for those cases.) – Pim Jager Jan 20 '09 at 14:23

I usually use the second one because it adds less signal.

share|improve this answer

What about this one:

function myFunc(arg1, arg2, arg3) {
    switch (arguments.length) {
        case 0 : arg1 = "default1";
        case 1 : arg2 = "default2";
        case 2 : arg3 = "default3";
    }
}
share|improve this answer

The choice I make depends on the parameter type and the default value required.

For example, this will assign the 'default value' if par2 is false, 0, an empty string, null or undefined:

par2 = par2 || 'default value';

That behavior may not be what is expected or required.

share|improve this answer

If you use jquery, you can do:

function foo(params){
 var params = $.extend({}, {bar: '2'}, params);
 alert(params.bar);
}
foo(); //Alerts 2
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Similar and related questions have been asked before.

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Never heard of the second way you mentioned, that is interesting. I would do:

function Foo(par1, par2)
{
    par2 = par2 ? par2 : 'default value';
}

But now that you bring to my attention your second method, I think I would use that just because it is less typing.

share|improve this answer
    
Guess number <0> or value <empty string> and many other would be treated wrongly. – Sergey Ilinsky Jan 20 '09 at 14:22
    
doesnt work for par2=false and default value = true. use undefined as below – Simon_Weaver Aug 12 '09 at 23:09

The one thing you have to think about when using the solution of

var foo = bar || 123;

is what values of bar that evaluate to false. It could cause you problems down the road.

Eric

share|improve this answer

If you're passing many arguments to a function you could do something like:

function myFunc() {
    arguments[0] = arguments[0] || "default value for first argument";
    arguments[3] = arguments[3] || "default value for fourth argument";
    alert(arguments[3]);
}
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