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Guys i have the following oracle sql query that gives me the monthwise report between the dates.Basically for nov month i want sum of values between the dates 01nov to 30 nov. The table that is being queried is residing in another database and accesssed using dblink. The DT columns is of NUMBER type (for ex 20101201).

SELECT /*+ PARALLEL (A 8) */ /*+ DRIVING_STATE(A) */
 TO_CHAR(TRUNC(TRUNC(SYSDATE,'MM')- 1,'MM'),'MONYYYY') "MONTH", 
   TYPE AS "TYPE", COLUMN, COUNT (DISTINCT A) AS "A_COUNT",
    COUNT (COLUMN) AS NO_OF_COLS, SUM (DURATION) AS "SUM_DURATION",
     SUM (COST) AS "COST"  FROM **A@LN_PROD A**  
      WHERE DT >=  TO_NUMBER(TO_CHAR(add_months(SYSDATE,-1),'YYYYMM"01"'))
      AND  DT < TO_NUMBER(TO_CHAR(SYSDATE,'YYYYMM"01"'))
       GROUP BY TYPE, COLUMN

The execution of the query is taking a day long and not completed. kindly suggest me , if their is any optimisation that can be suggested to my DBA on the dblink, or any tuning that can be done on the query , or rewriting the same.

UPDATES ON THE TABLE

The table is partiontioned on the date column and almost 1 billion records.

Below i have given the EXPLAIN PLAN from TOAD

**Plan**
SELECT STATEMENT REMOTE  ALL_ROWSCost: 1,208,299  Bytes: 34,760  Cardinality: 790                                               
    12 PX COORDINATOR                                           
        11 PX SEND QC (RANDOM) SYS.:TQ10002 Cost: 1,208,299  Bytes: 34,760  Cardinality: 790                                        
            10 SORT GROUP BY  Cost: 1,208,299  Bytes: 34,760  Cardinality: 790                                      
                9 PX RECEIVE  Cost: 1,208,299  Bytes: 34,760  Cardinality: 790                                  
                    8 PX SEND HASH SYS.:TQ10001 Cost: 1,208,299  Bytes: 34,760  Cardinality: 790                            
                        7 SORT GROUP BY  Cost: 1,208,299  Bytes: 34,760  Cardinality: 790                       
                            6 PX RECEIVE  Cost: 1,208,299  Bytes: 34,760  Cardinality: 790                      
                                5 PX SEND HASH SYS.:TQ10000 Cost: 1,208,299  Bytes: 34,760  Cardinality: 790                
                                    4 SORT GROUP BY  Cost: 1,208,299  Bytes: 34,760  Cardinality: 790           
                                        3 FILTER        
                                            2 PX BLOCK ITERATOR  Cost: 1,203,067  Bytes: 15,066,833,144  Cardinality: 342,428,026  Partition #: 11  Partitions accessed #1 - #5 
                                                1 TABLE ACCESS FULL TABLE CDRR.FRD_CDF_DATA_INTL_IN_P Cost: 1,203,067  Bytes: 15,066,833,144  Cardinality: 342,428,026  Partition #: 11  

The following things i am going to do today ,any additional tips would be helpful.

  1. I am going to gather the tablewise statistics for this table, which may give optimal execution plan.
  2. Check whether an local index is created for the partition .
  3. using BETWEEN instead of >= and <.
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2  
Just curious, how long does it take to run on the remote database directly? The DB Link may be a red herring if the query itself is simply taking a long time. –  Adam Hawkes Jan 6 '11 at 13:44
    
A billion rows! No wonder it takes a long time! –  Mike Meyers Jan 6 '11 at 13:49

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

As usual for this type of question, an explain plan would be useful. It would help us work out what is actually going on in the database.

Ideally you want to make sure the query is running on the remote database the sending the result set back, rather than sending the data across the link and running the query locally. This ensures that less data is sent across the link. The DRIVING_SITE hint can help with this, although Oracle is usually fairly smart about it so it might not help at all.

Oracle seems to have got better at running remote queries but there still can be problems.

Also, it might pay to simplify some of your date conversions.

For example, replace this:

TO_CHAR(TRUNC(TRUNC(SYSDATE,'MM')- 1,'MM'),'MONYYYY')

with this:

TO_CHAR(add_months(TRUNC(SYSDATE,'MM'), -1),'MONYYYY')

It is probably slightly more efficient but also is easier to read.

Likewise replace this:

WHERE DT >=TO_NUMBER(TO_CHAR(TRUNC(TRUNC(SYSDATE,'MM')-1,'MM'),'YYYYMMDD')) 
  AND  DT < TO_NUMBER(TO_CHAR(TRUNC(TRUNC(SYSDATE,'MM'),'MM'),'YYYYMMDD')) 

with

WHERE DT >=TO_NUMBER(TO_CHAR(add_months(TRUNC(SYSDATE,'MM'), -1),'YYYYMMDD')) 
  AND  DT < TO_NUMBER(TO_CHAR(TRUNC(SYSDATE,'MM'),'YYYYMMDD')) 

or even

WHERE DT >=TO_NUMBER(TO_CHAR(add_months(SYSDATE,-1),'YYYYMM"01"')) 
  AND  DT < TO_NUMBER(TO_CHAR(SYSDATE,'YYYYMM"01"')) 
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i have posted the explain plan here for your reference. kindly look in to int. –  Dead Programmer Jan 6 '11 at 13:23
    
@Suresh: I've never been that good at reading execution plans for parallel queries or partitions so prob can't help much. Does seem like an awfully big table though! I've found table/partition compression can help with large tables although that only really works for bulk load of static data in 10g (better in 11), but I think you can compress historic partitions as necessary. –  Mike Meyers Jan 6 '11 at 14:05

It may be because several issues: 1.Network speed because the database may be residing on different hardware. However you can refer this link http://www.experts-exchange.com/Database/Oracle/Q_21799513.html. There is a similar issue.

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network speed is good. –  Dead Programmer Jan 6 '11 at 11:20
    
have just highlighted one of the parameters –  UVM Jan 6 '11 at 11:21
    
wht cant you run the query in another database creating the missing tables.if it works fine, then you might be required to tune SQL query –  UVM Jan 6 '11 at 11:23

Impossible to answer without knowing the table structure, constraints, indexes, data volume, resultset size, network speed, level of concurrency, execution plans etcetera.

Some things I would investigate:

If the table is partitioned, does statistics exist for the partition the query is hitting? A common problem is that statistics are gathered on an empty partition before data has been inserted. Then when you query it (before the statistics are refreshed) Oracle chooses an index scan, when in fact it should use an FTS on that partition.

Also related to statistics: Make sure that

WHERE DT >=TO_NUMBER(TO_CHAR(TRUNC(TRUNC(SYSDATE,'MM')-1,'MM'),'YYYYMMDD')) 
  AND DT < TO_NUMBER(TO_CHAR(TRUNC(TRUNC(SYSDATE,'MM'),'MM'),'YYYYMMDD')) 

generates the same execution plan as:

WHERE DT >= 20101201
  AND DT <  20110101

Updated What version of Oracle are you on? The reason I'm asking is that on Oracle 10g and later, there is another implementation of group by that should have been selected in this case (hashing rather than sorting). It looks like you are basically sorting the 342 million rows returned from the date filter (14 gigabytes). Do you have the RAM to back that up? Otherwise you will be doing a multipass sort, spilling to disk. This is likely what is happening.

According to the plan, about 790 rows will be returned. Is that in the right ballpark? If so, you can rule out network issues :)

Also, I'm not entirely familiar with the format on that plan. Is the table sub partitioned? Otherwise I don't get the partition #11 reference.

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