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I'm opening an existing XML file with c# and I replace some nodes in there. All works fine. Just after I save it, I get the following characters at the beginning of the file:

  (EF BB BF in HEX)

The whole first line:

 <?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8" standalone="yes"?>

The rest of the file looks like a normal XML file.
The simplified code is here:

XmlDocument doc = new XmlDocument();
doc.Load(xmlSourceFile);
XmlNode translation = doc.SelectSingleNode("//trans-unit[@id='127']");
translation.InnerText = "testing";
doc.Save(xmlTranslatedFile);

I'm using a C# WinForm Application. With .NET 4.0.

Any ideas? Why would it do that? Can we disable that somehow? It's for Adobe InCopy and it does not open it like this.

UPDATE: Alternative Solution:

Saving it with the XmlTextWriter works too:

XmlTextWriter writer = new XmlTextWriter(inCopyFilename, null);
doc.Save(writer);
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5 Answers 5

up vote 22 down vote accepted

It is the UTF-8 BOM, which is actually discouraged by the Unicode standard:

http://www.unicode.org/versions/Unicode5.0.0/ch02.pdf

Use of a BOM is neither required nor recommended for UTF-8, but may be encountered in contexts where UTF-8 data is converted from other encoding forms that use a BOM or where the BOM is used as a UTF-8 signature

You may disable it using:

var sw = new IO.StreamWriter(path, new System.Text.UTF8Encoding(false));
doc.Save(sw);
sw.Close();
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Huh, I never knew it was discouraged... if it is, then how are programs supposed to detect encodings? –  Mehrdad Jan 6 '11 at 11:33
    
@Lambert: XML either specifies an encoding in the header or (missing that) is UTF-8 by default. –  Konrad Rudolph Jan 6 '11 at 11:41
    
@Lambert: for UTF-8 is the key part of the phrase. If you know it is utf-8 then there's no point, no endian-ness trouble. The odds of reading an xml file encoded in utf-16be without a bom are still zilch, even if it is declared in the processing instruction. –  Hans Passant Jan 6 '11 at 12:22
    
Thanks for all the answers. That helped. I've updated the question with another solution that I found after your input. –  Remy Jan 6 '11 at 12:47
    
This code does not compile. The first argument to StreamWriter is a Stream, not a path. Also, sw will never be closed if doc.Save(sw); throws an Exception. Classic case for the using statement. –  Eric J. Mar 26 '13 at 2:47

It's a UTF-8 Byte Order Mark (BOM) and is to be expected.

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See this post here - Jon Skeet explains how to use remove the BOM when saving your XMLDocument, if that is what you need.

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You can try to change the encoding of the XmlDocument. Below is the example copied from MSDN

using System; using System.IO; using System.Xml;

public class Sample {

  public static void Main() {

    // Create and load the XML document.
    XmlDocument doc = new XmlDocument();
    string xmlString = "<book><title>Oberon's Legacy</title></book>";
    doc.Load(new StringReader(xmlString));

    // Create an XML declaration. 
    XmlDeclaration xmldecl;
    xmldecl = doc.CreateXmlDeclaration("1.0",null,null);
    xmldecl.Encoding="UTF-16";
    xmldecl.Standalone="yes";     

    // Add the new node to the document.
    XmlElement root = doc.DocumentElement;
    doc.InsertBefore(xmldecl, root);

    // Display the modified XML document 
    Console.WriteLine(doc.OuterXml);

  } 

}

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1  
UTF-16 encoded XML. Yuck! –  dalle Jan 6 '11 at 11:42

As everybody else mentioned, it's Unicode issue.

I advise you to try LINQ To XML. Although not really related, I mention it as it's super easy compared to old ways and, more importantly, I assume it might have automatic resolutions to issues like these without extra coding from you.

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