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I have 2 spring web apps that provide 2 separate set of services. Web App 1 has Spring Security implemented using a user-based authentication.

Now, Web App 2 needs to access the service of Web App 1. Normally, we would use the RestTemplate class to make requests to other web services.

How do we pass the authentication credentials in the request of Web App 2 to Web App 1

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5 Answers 5

up vote 7 down vote accepted

I was in the same situation. Here there is my solution.

Server - spring security config

<sec:http>
    <sec:intercept-url pattern="/**" access="ROLE_USER" method="POST"/>
    <sec:intercept-url pattern="/**" filters="none" method="GET"/>
    <sec:http-basic />
</sec:http>

<sec:authentication-manager alias="authenticationManager">
    <sec:authentication-provider>
        <sec:user-service>
            <sec:user name="${rest.username}" password="${rest.password}" authorities="ROLE_USER"/>
        </sec:user-service>
    </sec:authentication-provider>
</sec:authentication-manager>

Client side RestTemplate config

<bean id="httpClient" class="org.apache.commons.httpclient.HttpClient">
    <constructor-arg ref="httpClientParams"/>
    <property name="state" ref="httpState"/>
</bean>

<bean id="httpState" class="CustomHttpState">
    <property name="credentials" ref="credentials"/>
</bean>

<bean id="credentials" class="org.apache.commons.httpclient.UsernamePasswordCredentials">
    <constructor-arg value="${rest.username}"/>
    <constructor-arg value="${rest.password}"/>
</bean>

<bean id="httpClientFactory" class="org.springframework.http.client.CommonsClientHttpRequestFactory">
    <constructor-arg ref="httpClient"/>
</bean>


<bean class="org.springframework.web.client.RestTemplate">
    <constructor-arg ref="httpClientFactory"/>                
</bean>

Custom HttpState implementation

/**
 * Custom implementation of {@link HttpState} with credentials property.
 *
 * @author banterCZ
 */
public class CustomHttpState extends HttpState {

    /**
     * Set credentials property.
     *
     * @param credentials
     * @see #setCredentials(org.apache.commons.httpclient.auth.AuthScope, org.apache.commons.httpclient.Credentials)
     */
    public void setCredentials(final Credentials credentials) {
        super.setCredentials(AuthScope.ANY, credentials);
    }

}

Maven dependency

<dependency>
   <groupId>commons-httpclient</groupId>
   <artifactId>commons-httpclient</artifactId>
   <version>3.1</version>
</dependency>
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Can you explain why to need a custom http state class? –  kamaci Nov 11 '11 at 8:42
    
@kamaci HttpState#setCredentials is not setter (also known as an accessor) since requires two parameters. So credentials is not a POJO field and cannot be accessed in Spring xml config. –  banterCZ Nov 14 '11 at 9:13
    
When I run my application it logs that: [org.springframework.beans.GenericTypeAwarePropertyDescriptor] - [Invalid JavaBean property 'credentials' being accessed! Ambiguous write methods found next to actually used [public void a.b.c.d.CustomHttpState.setCredentials(org.apache.commons.httpclient.Credentials‌​)]: ...(error continues). Is it usual? –  kamaci Nov 16 '11 at 9:58
    
No, it is not usual. Did you exactly copy and paste the class CustomHttpState? –  banterCZ Nov 22 '11 at 11:25
    
Your should really be specifying requires-channel="https" in each of your intercept-url entries. You should never send username/password information over un-encrypted http. –  mwielbut Jun 9 '13 at 11:29

Here is a solution that works very well with Spring 3.1 and Apache HttpComponents 4.1 I created based various answers on this site and reading the spring RestTempalte source code. I am sharing in hopes of saving others time, I think spring should just have some code like this built in but it does not.

RestClient client = new RestClient();
client.setApplicationPath("someApp");
String url = client.login("theuser", "123456");
UserPortfolio portfolio = client.template().getForObject(client.apiUrl("portfolio"), 
                         UserPortfolio.class);

Below is the Factory class which setups up the HttpComponents context to be the same on every request with the RestTemplate.

public class StatefullHttpComponentsClientHttpRequestFactory extends 
                   HttpComponentsClientHttpRequestFactory
{
    private final HttpContext httpContext;

    public StatefullHttpComponentsClientHttpRequestFactory(HttpClient httpClient, HttpContext httpContext)
    {
        super(httpClient);
        this.httpContext = httpContext;
    }

    @Override
    protected HttpContext createHttpContext(HttpMethod httpMethod, URI uri)
    {
        return this.httpContext;
    }
}

Below is Statefull Rest template that you can use to remember cookies, once you log in with it will remember the JSESSIONID and sent it on subsequent requests.

public class StatefullRestTemplate extends RestTemplate
{
    private final HttpClient httpClient;
    private final CookieStore cookieStore;
    private final HttpContext httpContext;
    private final StatefullHttpComponentsClientHttpRequestFactory statefullHttpComponentsClientHttpRequestFactory;

    public StatefullRestTemplate()
    {
        super();
        httpClient = new DefaultHttpClient();
        cookieStore = new BasicCookieStore();
        httpContext = new BasicHttpContext();
        httpContext.setAttribute(ClientContext.COOKIE_STORE, getCookieStore());
        statefullHttpComponentsClientHttpRequestFactory = new StatefullHttpComponentsClientHttpRequestFactory(httpClient, httpContext);
        super.setRequestFactory(statefullHttpComponentsClientHttpRequestFactory);
    }

    public HttpClient getHttpClient()
    {
        return httpClient;
    }

    public CookieStore getCookieStore()
    {
        return cookieStore;
    }

    public HttpContext getHttpContext()
    {
        return httpContext;
    }

    public StatefullHttpComponentsClientHttpRequestFactory getStatefulHttpClientRequestFactory()
    {
        return statefullHttpComponentsClientHttpRequestFactory;
    }
}

Here is a class to represent a rest client so that you can call into an app secured with spring security.

public class RestClient
{
    private String host = "localhost";
    private String port = "8080";
    private String applicationPath;
    private String apiPath = "api";
    private String loginPath = "j_spring_security_check";
    private String logoutPath = "logout";
    private final String usernameInputFieldName = "j_username";
    private final String passwordInputFieldName = "j_password";
    private final StatefullRestTemplate template = new StatefullRestTemplate();

    /**
     * This method logs into a service by doing an standard http using the configuration in this class.
     * 
     * @param username
     *            the username to log into the application with
     * @param password
     *            the password to log into the application with
     * 
     * @return the url that the login redirects to
     */
    public String login(String username, String password)
    {
        MultiValueMap<String, String> form = new LinkedMultiValueMap<>();
        form.add(usernameInputFieldName, username);
        form.add(passwordInputFieldName, password);
        URI location = this.template.postForLocation(loginUrl(), form);
        return location.toString();
    }

    /**
     * Logout by doing an http get on the logout url
     * 
     * @return result of the get as ResponseEntity
     */
    public ResponseEntity<String> logout()
    {
        return this.template.getForEntity(logoutUrl(), String.class);
    }

    public String applicationUrl(String relativePath)
    {
        return applicationUrl() + "/" + checkNotNull(relativePath);
    }

    public String apiUrl(String relativePath)
    {
        return applicationUrl(apiPath + "/" + checkNotNull(relativePath));
    }

    public StatefullRestTemplate template()
    {
        return template;
    }

    public String serverUrl()
    {
        return "http://" + host + ":" + port;
    }

    public String applicationUrl()
    {
        return serverUrl() + "/" + nullToEmpty(applicationPath);
    }

    public String loginUrl()
    {
        return applicationUrl(loginPath);
    }

    public String logoutUrl()
    {
        return applicationUrl(logoutPath);
    }

    public String apiUrl()
    {
        return applicationUrl(apiPath);
    }

    public void setLogoutPath(String logoutPath)
    {
        this.logoutPath = logoutPath;
    }

    public String getHost()
    {
        return host;
    }

    public void setHost(String host)
    {
        this.host = host;
    }

    public String getPort()
    {
        return port;
    }

    public void setPort(String port)
    {
        this.port = port;
    }

    public String getApplicationPath()
    {
        return applicationPath;
    }

    public void setApplicationPath(String contextPath)
    {
        this.applicationPath = contextPath;
    }

    public String getApiPath()
    {
        return apiPath;
    }

    public void setApiPath(String apiPath)
    {
        this.apiPath = apiPath;
    }

    public String getLoginPath()
    {
        return loginPath;
    }

    public void setLoginPath(String loginPath)
    {
        this.loginPath = loginPath;
    }

    public String getLogoutPath()
    {
        return logoutPath;
    }

    @Override
    public String toString()
    {
        StringBuilder builder = new StringBuilder();
        builder.append("RestClient [\n serverUrl()=");
        builder.append(serverUrl());
        builder.append(", \n applicationUrl()=");
        builder.append(applicationUrl());
        builder.append(", \n loginUrl()=");
        builder.append(loginUrl());
        builder.append(", \n logoutUrl()=");
        builder.append(logoutUrl());
        builder.append(", \n apiUrl()=");
        builder.append(apiUrl());
        builder.append("\n]");
        return builder.toString();
    }
}
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The RestTemplate is very basic and limited; there doesn't seem to be an easy way to do this. The best way is probably to implement digest of basic auth in Web App 1. Then use Apache HttpClient directly to access the rest services from Web App 2.

That being said, for testing I was able to work around this with a big hack. Basically you use the RestTemplate to submit the login (j_spring_security_check), parse out the jsessionid from the request headers, then submit the rest request. Here's the code, but I doubt it's the best solution for production ready code.

public final class RESTTest {
  public static void main(String[] args) {
    RestTemplate rest = new RestTemplate();

    HttpsURLConnection.setDefaultHostnameVerifier(new HostnameVerifier() {
        @Override
        public boolean verify(String s, SSLSession sslsession) {
            return true;
        }
    });

    // setting up a trust store with JCA is a whole other issue
    // this assumes you can only log in via SSL
    // you could turn that off, but not on a production site!
    System.setProperty("javax.net.ssl.trustStore", "/path/to/cacerts");
    System.setProperty("javax.net.ssl.trustStorePassword", "somepassword");

    String jsessionid = rest.execute("https://localhost:8443/j_spring_security_check", HttpMethod.POST,
            new RequestCallback() {
                @Override
                public void doWithRequest(ClientHttpRequest request) throws IOException {
                 request.getBody().write("j_username=user&j_password=user".getBytes());
                }
            }, new ResponseExtractor<String>() {
                @Override
                public String extractData(ClientHttpResponse response) throws IOException {
                    List<String> cookies = response.getHeaders().get("Cookie");

                    // assuming only one cookie with jsessionid as the only value
                    if (cookies == null) {
                        cookies = response.getHeaders().get("Set-Cookie");
                    }

                    String cookie = cookies.get(cookies.size() - 1);

                    int start = cookie.indexOf('=');
                    int end = cookie.indexOf(';');

                    return cookie.substring(start + 1, end);
                }
            });

    rest.put("http://localhost:8080/rest/program.json;jsessionid=" + jsessionid, new DAO("REST Test").asJSON());
}

}

Note for this to work, you need to create a trust store in JCA so the SSL connection can actually be made. I assume you don't want to have Spring Security's login be over plain HTTP for a production site since that would be a massive security hole.

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i realize you answered this over a year ago but i'd like to take you up on your offer to "post the code" if it's still available. :) thanks –  Justin May 10 '12 at 21:02
    
Code posted, but haven't tried it again with a recent version of Spring. Has the RestTemplate not been updated? –  AngerClown May 11 '12 at 0:15

The currently authenticated user credentials should be available in Web App 1 on Authentication object, which is accessible through SecurityContext (for example, you can retrieve it by calling SecurityContextHolder.getContext().getAuthentication()).

After you retrieve the credentials, you can use them to access Web App 2.

You can pass "Authentiation" header with RestTemplate by either extending it with a decorator (as described here) or using RestTemplate.exchange() method, as described in this forum post.

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I would assume that Web App 2 can't see the HTTP session for Web App 1, so this probably won't work. –  AngerClown Jan 7 '11 at 1:18
    
Sorry, misunderstood the desired direction: from Web App2 to Web App 1. Changing my answer. –  Boris Kirzner Jan 7 '11 at 5:43

There's a simple way to do this in case you are someone who's looking for a simple call and not a API consumer.

HttpClient client = new HttpClient();
    client.getParams().setAuthenticationPreemptive(true);
    Credentials defaultcreds = new UsernamePasswordCredentials("username", "password");
    RestTemplate restTemplate = new RestTemplate();
    restTemplate.setRequestFactory(new CommonsClientHttpRequestFactory(client));
    client.getState().setCredentials(AuthScope.ANY, defaultcreds);
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