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How can I use BOOST_FOREACH efficiently (number-of-character/readability-wise) with a boost::ptr_map?

Kristo demonstrated in his answer that it is possible to use BOOST_FOREACH with a ptr_map, but it does not really save me any typing (or makes my code really more readable) than iterating over the ptr_map with an iterator:

typedef boost::ptr_container_detail::ref_pair<int, int* const> IntPair;
BOOST_FOREACH(IntPair p, mymap) {
    int i = p.first;
}

// vs.

boost::ptr_map<int, T>::iterator it;
for (it = mymap.begin(); it != mymap.end(); ++it) {
    // doSomething()
}

The following code is somewhere along the lines what I wish for. It follows the standard way on how to use BOOST_FOREACH with a std::map. Unfortunately this does not compile:

boost::ptr_map<int, T> mymap;
// insert something into mymap
// ...

typedef pair<int, T> IntTpair;
BOOST_FOREACH (IntTpair &p, mymap) {
    int i = p.first;
}
share|improve this question
up vote 15 down vote accepted

As STL style containers, the pointer containers have a value_type typedef that you can use:

#include <boost/ptr_container/ptr_map.hpp>
#include <boost/foreach.hpp>

int main()
{
    typedef boost::ptr_map<int, int> int_map;
    int_map mymap;

    BOOST_FOREACH(int_map::value_type p, mymap)
    {
    }
}

I find that using a typedef for the container makes the code a lot easier to write.

Also, you should try to avoid using the contents of detail namespaces in boost, it's a boost convention that they contain implementation details.

share|improve this answer

I just ran into the same problem today. Unfortunately, Daniel's suggestion will not work with a constant reference to a map. In my case, the ptr_map was a member of a class, and I wanted to loop through it in a const member function. Borrowing Daniel's example, this is what I had to do in my case:

#include "boost/ptr_container/ptr_map.hpp"
#include "boost/foreach.hpp"

int main()
{
    typedef boost::ptr_map<int, int> int_map;
    int_map mymap;
    const int_map& mymap_const_ref(mymap);

    BOOST_FOREACH(int_map::const_iterator::value_type p, mymap_const_ref)
    {
    }
}

It seems that int_map::const_iterator::value_type is equivalent to boost::ptr_container_detail::ref_pair<int, const int* const>.

share|improve this answer

Save yourself the typing and improve readability by using tuples:

boost::ptr_map<int, T> mymap;
int key;
T * value;
BOOST_FOREACH(boost::tie(key, value), mymap)
{
    ...
}
share|improve this answer

This example code compiled for me with g++ 4.1.2:

#include "boost/ptr_container/ptr_map.hpp"
#include "boost/foreach.hpp"

int main()
{
    boost::ptr_map<int, int> mymap;

    typedef boost::ptr_container_detail::ref_pair<int, int* const> IntPair;
    BOOST_FOREACH(IntPair p, mymap)
    {
        int i = p.first;
    }

    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you Kristo, this is what I eventually also came up with. However, for this one has to write so much in the typedef, that it is not a real abbreviation over the standard for(ptr_map<int, int>::iterator it = mymap.begin(); it != mymap.end(); ++it) {} anymore... – Martin Jan 20 '09 at 17:36
    
I agree. I'm interested to see if there's a shorter (better?) way to write that typedef. You also have to consider your coworkers. How many of them will say, "You wrote a crazy typedef just to let you use BOOST_FOREACH? Just write a normal for-loop and be done." :) – Michael Kristofik Jan 20 '09 at 17:53

I use this homebrew template which adds an iteration type which can be handled by BOOST_FOREACH

namspace homebrew
{
  template
  <
    class Key,
    class T,
    class Compare        = std::less<Key>,
    class CloneAllocator = boost::heap_clone_allocator,
    class Allocator      = std::allocator< std::pair<const Key,void*> >
  >
  class ptr_map :
    public boost::ptr_map<Key,T,Compare,CloneAllocator,Allocator>
  {
  public:
    typedef boost::ptr_container_detail::ref_pair<Key,const T* const> const_ref;
    typedef boost::ptr_container_detail::ref_pair<Key,T* const> ref;
  };
} 

Let's assume that foo and bar are two of your favorite types ;)

typedef homebrew::ptr_map<foo,bar> Map;
int f( const Map& m )
{
  BOOST_FOREACH(Map::const_ref v, m)
  {
    v.first;  // foo
    v.second; // const bar* const
  }
}

or

int f( Map& m )
{
  BOOST_FOREACH(Map::ref v, m)
  {
    v.first;  // foo
    v.second; // bar* const
  }
}

Which one you have to use doesn't seem to depend on the way you use it in the loop (const or non-const) but on the map's constness!! So the following will end up in an error...

int f( Map& m )
{
  BOOST_FOREACH(Map::const_ref v, m)  // can't use const_ref because m isn't const
  {
    ...
  }
}

Weird! isn't it?

The greatest thing to me is that of all this solutions which were suggested here, this is the first one which is handled correctly by the Eclipse CDT syntax coloring (when using the 'Code/Problem' syntax coloring attribute).

share|improve this answer

It should compile without the reference:

BOOST_FOREACH (IntTpair p, mymap)

I think the problem is that maps do not actually store objects as pairs, but as a tree structure with the first element as the key, so BOOST_FOREACH can't get a reference to a pair but it can create a temporary copy of one.

share|improve this answer

using ::value_type won't let you const-iterate through the container. I use iterator reference types

typedef boost::ptr_map< myKey, myPtrType > MyMap;
MyMap m;
BOOST_FOREACH( MyMap::iterator::reference it, m )
  do_something( it.second );
BOOST_FOREACH( MyMap::const_iterator::reference it, m )
  do_something_const( it.second );
share|improve this answer

In the end, I went for declaring the iteration variable before the loop.

std::pair<std::string, TrailStep*> step;
BOOST_FOREACH(step, m_steps)
{
    SAFE_DELETE(step.second);
}

But indeed, there ought to be a simpler way. (Use D instead?)

share|improve this answer

You might try this uber-cool way to iterate over maps, ptr or otherwise: https://svn.boost.org/trac/boost/attachment/ticket/3469/foreach_field.hpp

// no typedef needed
BOOST_FOREACH_FIELD((int i)(const T& t), mymap)
   // do something with i or t instead of first/second

I'm not sure it will work with a template parameter, but maybe you used that just for abstraction.

share|improve this answer

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