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I would have another question I cannot find answer on. I know that the order of catch blocks is from the most derived to the most general.
But I do not understand why I can have this (why does this order work? formatException is derived from Exception so its more general, right?)

catch(formatException)
//this is derived from Exception

catch(OutoFMemoryException) 
// this is derived from ArithmeticException whic is derived from Exception
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It the most specific first to general. So if you were dealing with some code regarding SQL you would catch the SQL exceptions first before the catch all of Exception –  Barry Jan 6 '11 at 12:59

9 Answers 9

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Not nescessary, even though OverflowException derives from ArithmeticException their most common denominator is Exception.

You can see it as somekind of tree structure, where FormatException and OverflowException is on different sides of the tree. If OverflowException inherited from FormatException the situation would be different, but that is not the case.

Also, you can have them in different order but it is no point since if you have a more general exception first it will catch every exception below it as well.

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Thanks, however I still do not get it entirely..If all exceptions inherit from Exception class, which are some more derived ones? –  Loj Jan 6 '11 at 13:07
    
@Loj: I agree that derived can be hard to understand since for me it seems like the wrong word to use. Think of it as specific to general instead. And you also has to do in the context of the least common denominator (Exception in your case). OverflowException is as specific as ArithmeticException in the context of Exception. Does it make more sense? –  Tomas Jansson Jan 6 '11 at 13:43

The CLR steps through the catch blocks in the order provided.

If it finds a catch statement with an exception type that matches the current exception or an exception that inherits from the current exception, then that block will be called.

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You have to go from the most specific exception to the most general exception.

For example, in the code below:

int x = 4 / (1 - 1);

You'll get an exception of type DivideByZeroException, which is an ArithmeticException, which is an Exception.

So how would you use it?

When you know you can get certain types of errors, you can put specific code when each of them happen.

If you know you can get a DivideByZeroException, you put a catch block for that, and treat it the way you should. And you should also add a catch for a more general Exception type:

try
{
    int x = 4 / (1 - 1);
    // More Stuff
}
catch(DivideByZeroException ex)
{
    // Here we know we got an exception on that division
}
catch(Exception ex)
{
   // Here we know something went wrong on that "more stuff"
}

You can make it easier to solve problems this way.

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The try-catch statement consists of a try block followed by one or more catch clauses, which specify handlers for different exceptions.

When an exception is thrown, the common language runtime (CLR) looks for the catch statement that handles this exception.

If the currently executing method does not contain such a catch block, the CLR looks at the method that called the current method, and so on up the call stack.

If no catch block is found, then the CLR displays an unhandled exception message to the user and stops execution of the program.

Above found @ msdn

The CLR halts at the first catch block that can handle the exception. Whichever one comes first in the list.

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It also depends on the type of the exception that is thrown that will determine which catch block is called. Since you have a catch for FormatException defined, then if a FormatException is thrown it will be caught by that catch only if the Exception catch is not defined before it. If you did not define the FormatException catch, then an Exception catch would handle the FormatException since it derives from Exception.

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Use this piece of code for example. You should always use the most specific exception first and then use the most general exception at the end. Or I believe I can say as you put it - The most derived exception first.

In this case, the first catch block already catches all exceptions of this or of a super type ('System.Exception')". This is the reason for the order for exception.

try
{
 throw new formatException();
}


catch(Exception ex)
{
    <...>
}
catch(formatException ex)
{
    <...>
}

Edit -

If you look at the inheritance hierarchy of FormatException class -

  System.Exception
    System.SystemException
      System.FormatException

and the inheritance hierarchy of OutOfMemoryException class is -

  System.Exception
    System.SystemException
      System.OutOfMemoryException

The order of precedence of exceptions comes into the picture only when you have catch blocks with exception classes that are either base or derived classes of each other.

For e.g. if you have two catch blocks - FormatException and Exception then you will need to worry about the order of the catch blocks because FormatException class inherits from Exception class. If Exception catch block is placed before the FormatException catch block then every exception is caught by the Exception catch block (even a format exception). If you have the FormatException catch block before the Exception catch block then a format exception is caught by the specific FormatException catch block but all other exceptions are caught by the Exception catch block.

But, if you have two catch blocks such as FormatException and OutOfMemoryException. Then you don't need to worry about the order as these two classes aren't the base or derived from each other. So, they are just specific exceptions.

So, you can have either -

try
{
 throw new formatException();
}
catch(OutOfMemoryException ex)
{
    <...>
}
catch(FormatException ex)
{
    <...>
}

Or

try
{
 throw new formatException();
}  
catch(FormatException ex)
{
    <...>
}
catch(OutOfMemoryException ex)
{
    <...>
}

It wouldn't make a difference because, no matter what the order is the formatexception is always caught by the specific FormatException catch block. Its the same for OutOfMemoryException. I hope this answers your question.

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Yes I understand FormatException is derived from Exception so it has precedence. But what would have precedence even before FormatException? –  Loj Jan 6 '11 at 13:16
    
Check my updated answer. –  Pavanred Jan 6 '11 at 16:41

It works on hierarchy and OverflowExceptiona and FormatException are on different branches, and share common Exception class only.

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The point is Subclass will come first then Base class

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Yes so I thought if ArithmeticException is derived from Exception, its subclass. And OverflowException is derived from this one. –  Loj Jan 6 '11 at 13:19

@Loj, you can conceptually think of the catch statements as a switch statement (we can't write a switch statement like this, but nonetheless):

switch (caughtException) 
{ 
   case (caughtException is FormatException):...;
   case (caughtException is OverflowException):...; 
   case (caughtException is Exception):...; 
   etc.  

The first Type that fulfills the "is" check will be the one that handles your exception. This is why you need to be mindful of the order of your catch blocks. Catch blocks are specified from the most specific to the most general as this is the best way to ensure we haven't confused ourselves.

In your example, OutOfMemoryException is "further removed" from Exception than FormatException, but this doesn't create a problem because the check caughtException is FormatException returns false, and we move on to the next possibility.

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