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I'm trying to do something that used to be really easy before the start attribute on ol tags was deprecated. I'd just like to have a pair of ordered lists in my page, but start the numbering of the second list where the first one finished. Something like:

1. do stuff
2. do stuff

Here's a paragraph

3. do stuff

I've seen that the counter-reset and counter-increment CSS properties should be able to achieve this, but I can't get it working. Here's my code so far:

<html>
<head>
  <style type="text/css">
    ol li { counter-increment: mycounter; }
    ol.start { counter-reset: mycounter; }
    ol.continue { counter-reset: mycounter 2; }
  </style>
</head>

<body>
  <ol class="start">
    <li>You can't touch this</li>
    <li>You can't touch this</li>
  </ol>
  <p>STOP! Hammer time.</p>
  <ol class="continue">
    <li>You can't touch this</li>
  </ol>
</body>
</html>

To be honest, even if that worked, it wouldn't be ideal. I don't want to have to specify the number reached by the first list in my ol.continue selector.

What am I doing wrong? What's the minimal HTML/CSS combination required to achieve the desired effect?

Thanks in advance... :)

The solution I finally adopted
Here's the HTML and CSS code I finally used. Thanks to Felix for getting me there. Must also mention that Lee offers an interesting jQuery alternative too.

<html>
<head>
  <style type="text/css">
    ol.split { list-style-type: none; }
    ol.split li:before
    {
      counter-increment: mycounter;
      content: counter(mycounter) ".\00A0\00A0";
    }
    ol.split li
    {
      text-indent: -1.3em;
    }
    ol.start { counter-reset: mycounter; }
  </style>
</head>

<body>
  <ol class="split start">
    <li>You can't touch this</li>
    <li>You can't touch this</li>
  </ol>
  <p>STOP! Hammer time.</p>
  <ol class="split">
    <li>You can't touch this</li>
  </ol>
</body>
</html>

Caveat: it turns out that this 'solution' doesn't work in IE8's compatibility view (and probably other versions/browsers too). If that doesn't bother you, great. :)

share|improve this question
    
Someone voted to close this question? Presumably, that's because it's a repeat of another question elsewhere. If so, please can you point me in the right direction? I looked, but didn't find. Thanks. –  Mal Ross Jan 6 '11 at 13:47
    
No, some people just don't understand the distinction between webmasters.stackexchange.com and StackOverflow. This question has source code, which seems to qualify it to belong here. –  Cody Gray Jan 6 '11 at 13:49
1  
The active close vote is for "Off Topic", god knows why - it seems entirely on topic. –  Orbling Jan 6 '11 at 13:49
    
Hehe. Thanks guys. –  Mal Ross Jan 6 '11 at 13:52
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4 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

As already said, you need :before and content, but you also need to disable the default list numbering. This is your fixed CSS:

ol.start { 
    counter-reset: mycounter; 
}
ol.start li, ol.continue li {
    list-style: none;
}
ol.start li:before, ol.continue li:before { 
    content: counter(mycounter) ". "; 
    counter-increment: mycounter;
}

You don't need to reset the counter for ol.continue, just continue to use your custom counter. The above code makes sure that the counter is only used for the ol.start and ol.continue lists.

share|improve this answer
    
Close, but this breaks the list's hanging indent. I'm sure I can fix that, but I'm off into a meeting now and suspect someone else might get there before me... :) –  Mal Ross Jan 6 '11 at 14:00
    
@Mal Ross: Yep, I know it breaks the indent, you would have to adjust it. There is no way to just replace the automatic number. –  Felix Kling Jan 6 '11 at 14:02
    
Ok, thanks for confirming that. –  Mal Ross Jan 6 '11 at 14:37
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you also need to use a :before rule with a content tag that references the counter:

see here: http://www.w3schools.com/css/pr_gen_counter-reset.asp

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1  
This answer would be even better if you fixed the code snippet from the question. –  Cody Gray Jan 6 '11 at 13:50
    
You are right but i really think people should work a little on their problems today in order to be able to avoid them in the future. I will try to nudge someone in the right direction if i can thou. –  Mihai Claudiu Toader Jan 6 '11 at 13:59
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The start attribute is valid in html5. I would just use that.

http://dev.w3.org/html5/spec/Overview.html#the-ol-element

Also http://dev.w3.org/html5/spec/Overview.html#the-ol-element States that it is still supported in all browsers. You would have to test to be sure I guess.

some jquery to set the start attribute dynamically if you are into that sort of thing..

  // assuming all your ol's have the class mylist
  $(function(){
    var counter=1;
    $('ol.mylist').each(function(){
      $this = $(this);
      $this.attr('start',counter);
      counter += $(this).find('li').length;
    });
  });
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the tip, but wouldn't it restrict this part of my site's content to working in only the more recent versions of various browsers? Also, from my reading of it, it means I have to hard-code the starting number for the follow-on list, which is something I'd prefer to avoid. –  Mal Ross Jan 6 '11 at 14:51
    
If you have two lists you will either have to hard code the start of the second or use script to change the numbering. What about using jquery to update the start attribute? –  Lee Jan 6 '11 at 15:06
    
w3.org says start is still supported in all major browsers. Don't know how reliable that is since it also still says it's deprecated. –  Lee Jan 6 '11 at 15:21
    
Thanks for the extra jQuery option. Were it not for my (current) lack of experience with jQuery, I might adopt that as my solution, but given that it's possible to use the counter attributes in CSS without hard-coding the continuation number, I'm going to go with that. Thanks for your input, though - it'll give others reading this question another good option. :) –  Mal Ross Jan 6 '11 at 15:51
    
w3schools also notes that it IS supported in html5. –  doubleJ Jul 31 '12 at 21:18
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The Opera DevNet has a nice example for exactly this use-case available here: http://devfiles.myopera.com/articles/501/counters-start-example.html (which is part of their article about counters)

So your code should look somehow like this:

<html>
<head>
  <style type="text/css">
    ol li { counter-increment: mycounter; }
    ol.start { counter-reset: mycounter; }
    ol.continue { counter-reset: mycounter 2; }
    ol li { 
        counter-increment: mycounter;
        list-style-type: none;
    }
    ol li:before { content: counter(mycounter) ". "; }
  </style>
</head>

<body>
  <ol class="start">
    <li>You can't touch this</li>
    <li>You can't touch this</li>
  </ol>
  <p>STOP! Hammer time.</p>
  <ol class="continue">
    <li>You can't touch this</li>
  </ol>
</body>
</html>

But, as Lee mentioned, ol@start seems no longer again deprecated, I'd personally prefer that approach since this is not only a styling but also an issue of semantics in your markup.

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