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Is there any way to get something like the following to work in JavaScript?

var foo = {
    a: 5,
    b: 6,
    c: this.a + this.b  // Doesn't work
};

In the current form, this code obviously throws a reference error since this doesn't refer to foo. But is there any way to have values in an object literal's properties depend on other properties declared earlier?

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possible duplicate of How can a Javascript object refer to values in itself? –  givanse Mar 10 at 3:49
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8 Answers

up vote 55 down vote accepted

You could do something like:

var foo = {
   a: 5,
   b: 6,
   init: function() {
       this.c = this.a + this.b;
       return this;
   }
}.init();

This would be some kind of one time initialization of the object.

Note that you are actually assigning the return value of init() to foo, therefore you have to return this.

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28  
you can also delete this.init before return this so that foo is not poluted –  Billy Moon Jul 26 '11 at 1:12
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Well, the only thing that I can tell you about are getters:

var foo = {
  a: 5,
  b: 6,
  get c () {
    return this.a + this.b;
  }
};

foo.c; // 11

This is a syntactic extension introduced by the ECMAScript 5th Edition Specification, the syntax is supported by most modern browsers (including IE9).

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4  
this is just awesome –  Nico Jan 26 '13 at 20:52
3  
Very helpful answer. More info on 'get' can be found here: developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/JavaScript/Reference/Operators/… –  jake Feb 2 '13 at 16:21
    
it doesn't work if a is an array –  Fausto R. Nov 4 '13 at 14:51
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The obvious, simple answer is missing, so for completeness:

But is there any way to have values in an object literal's properties depend on other properties declared earlier?

No. All of the solutions here defer it until after the object is created (in various ways) and then assign the third property. The simplest way is to just do this:

var foo = {
    a: 5,
    b: 6
};
foo.c = foo.a + foo.b;

All others are just more indirect ways to do the same thing. (Felix's is particularly clever, but requires creating and destroying a temporary function, and adding complexity.)

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Simply instantiate an anonymous function:

var foo = new function () {
    this.a = 5;
    this.b = 6;
    this.c = this.a + this.b;
};
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You can do it using the module pattern. Just like:

var foo = function() {
  var that = {};

  that.a = 7;
  that.b = 6;

  that.c = function() {
    return that.a + that.b;
  }

  return that;
};
var fooObject = foo();
fooObject.c(); //13

With this pattern you can instantiate several foo objects according to your need.

http://jsfiddle.net/jPNxY/1/

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1  
This isn't an example of the module pattern, just a function. If the last line of the foo definition was }();, it would self execute and return an object, not a function. Also, foo.c is a function, so writing to it clobbers that function and the next invocation via fooObject.c() will fail. Maybe this fiddle is closer to what you're going for (it's also a singleton, not designed to be instantiated). –  Hollister Dec 26 '13 at 1:24
    
"The Module pattern was originally defined as a way to provide both private and public encapsulation for classes in conventional software engineering". From: Learning JavaScript Design Patterns. That's object follow the module pattern described above but maybe it isn't the best one to explain that because is not showing public and private properties/methods. This one jsfiddle.net/9nnR5/2 is the same object with public and private properties/methods. So both of them are following this pattern –  Rafael Rocha Jan 16 at 19:48
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Some closure should deal with this;

var foo = function() {
    var a = 5;
    var b = 6;
    var c = a + b;

    return {
        a: a,
        b: b,
        c: c
    }
}();

All the variables declared within foo are private to foo, as you would expect with any function declaration and because they are all in scope, they all have access to each other without needing to refer to this, just as you would expect with a function. The difference is that this function returns an object that exposes the private variables and assigns that object to foo. In the end, you return just the interface you want to expose as an object with the return {} statement.

The function is then executed at the end with the () which causes the entire foo object to be evaluated, all the variables within instantiated and the return object added as properties of foo().

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You could do it like this

var a, b
var foo = {
    a: a = 5,
    b: b = 6,
    c: a + b
}

That method has proven useful to me when I had to refer to the object that a function was originally declared on. The following is a minimal example of how I used it:

function createMyObject() {
    var count = 0, self
    return {
        a: self = {
            log: function() {
                console.log(count++)
                return self
            }
        }
    }
}

By defining self as the object that contains the print function you allow the function to refer to that object. This means you will not have to 'bind' the print function to an object if you need to pass it somewhere else.

If you would, instead, use this as illustrated below

function createMyObject() {
    var count = 0
    return {
        a: {
            log: function() {
                console.log(count++)
                return this
            }
        }
    }
}

Then the following code will log 0, 1, 2 and then give an error

var o = createMyObject()
var log = o.a.log
o.a.log().log() // this refers to the o.a object so the chaining works
log().log() // this refers to the window object so the chaining fails!

By using the self method you guarantee that print will always return the same object regardless of the context in which the function is ran. The code above will run just fine and log 0, 1, 2 and 3 when using the self version of createMyObject().

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There are several ways to accomplish this; this is what I would use:

function Obj() {
 this.a = 5;
 this.b = this.a + 1;
 // return this; // commented out because this happens automatically
}

var o = new Obj();
o.b; // === 6
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This works, but eliminates the advantages of the object literal notation. –  kpozin Jan 15 '11 at 17:01
    
True, sorry I missed the object-literal tag originally. I mostly only use object literals for data structures, and anytime I want any additional logic (which might resemble a class) I create the object as the result of a function for this very reason. –  ken Jan 16 '11 at 0:16
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