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Is there any way to get something like the following to work in JavaScript?

var foo = {
    a: 5,
    b: 6,
    c: this.a + this.b  // Doesn't work
};

In the current form, this code obviously throws a reference error since this doesn't refer to foo. But is there any way to have values in an object literal's properties depend on other properties declared earlier?

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7  
not being able to do this is just bizzzare –  Muhammad Umer Mar 19 at 14:26

11 Answers 11

up vote 116 down vote accepted

You could do something like:

var foo = {
   a: 5,
   b: 6,
   init: function() {
       this.c = this.a + this.b;
       return this;
   }
}.init();

This would be some kind of one time initialization of the object.

Note that you are actually assigning the return value of init() to foo, therefore you have to return this.

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43  
you can also delete this.init before return this so that foo is not poluted –  Billy Moon Jul 26 '11 at 1:12
6  
@BillyMoon: Yes indeed, although doing so impacts performance of all subsequent property accesses on that object, on many engines (V8, for instance). –  T.J. Crowder May 19 '14 at 7:30
    
this in ES6 classes works as expected. So no need to call init there. –  Muhammad Umer Jun 1 at 3:01
1  
@MuhammadUmer: Not sure how ES6 classes are relevant to the question. –  Felix Kling Jun 1 at 3:02
    
it shows another way to solve problem that wasn't available. –  Muhammad Umer Jun 1 at 3:20

Well, the only thing that I can tell you about are getters:

var foo = {
  a: 5,
  b: 6,
  get c () {
    return this.a + this.b;
  }
};

foo.c; // 11

This is a syntactic extension introduced by the ECMAScript 5th Edition Specification, the syntax is supported by most modern browsers (including IE9).

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8  
this is just awesome –  bevacqua Jan 26 '13 at 20:52
5  
Very helpful answer. More info on 'get' can be found here: developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/JavaScript/Reference/Operators/… –  jake Feb 2 '13 at 16:21
    
it doesn't work if a is an array –  Fausto R. Nov 4 '13 at 14:51
2  
@FaustoR. Yes it does. –  Charlie Martin Sep 19 '14 at 19:04
2  
Beware that with this solution if the values of foo.a or foo.b are changed then the value of foo.c will also change in synchronism. This may or may not be what is required. –  HBP May 2 at 6:21

The obvious, simple answer is missing, so for completeness:

But is there any way to have values in an object literal's properties depend on other properties declared earlier?

No. All of the solutions here defer it until after the object is created (in various ways) and then assign the third property. The simplest way is to just do this:

var foo = {
    a: 5,
    b: 6
};
foo.c = foo.a + foo.b;

All others are just more indirect ways to do the same thing. (Felix's is particularly clever, but requires creating and destroying a temporary function, adding complexity; and either leaves an extra property on the object or [if you delete that property] impacts the performance of subsequent property accesses on that object.)

If you need it to all be within one expression, you can do that without the temporary property:

var foo = function(o) {
    o.c = o.a + o.b;
    return o;
}({a: 5, b: 6});

Or of course, if you need to do this more than once:

function buildFoo(a, b) {
    var o = {a: a, b: b};
    o.c = o.a + o.b;
    return o;
}

then where you need to use it:

var foo = buildFoo(5, 6);
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Simply instantiate an anonymous function:

var foo = new function () {
    this.a = 5;
    this.b = 6;
    this.c = this.a + this.b;
};
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1  
This is the most beautiful answer. Deserves more upvotes. –  Oriol Jun 23 at 19:32
    
Don't do this! –  Bergi 20 hours ago
    
@Bergi, why? Because someone might instantiate another of the same object from it? It's not like they can't just clone an object literal. It's no different than passing an argument like new Point(x, y) except that the function isn't named for reuse. –  zzzzBov 20 hours ago
    
@zzzzBov: Of course they can just clone the object, but compared to an IEFE solution (like in TJCrowder's answer) your solution leaks the constructor function and creates a superfluous prototype object. –  Bergi 18 hours ago
    
@Bergi, sure, but this is significantly more expressive. –  zzzzBov 17 hours ago

Some closure should deal with this;

var foo = function() {
    var a = 5;
    var b = 6;
    var c = a + b;

    return {
        a: a,
        b: b,
        c: c
    }
}();

All the variables declared within foo are private to foo, as you would expect with any function declaration and because they are all in scope, they all have access to each other without needing to refer to this, just as you would expect with a function. The difference is that this function returns an object that exposes the private variables and assigns that object to foo. In the end, you return just the interface you want to expose as an object with the return {} statement.

The function is then executed at the end with the () which causes the entire foo object to be evaluated, all the variables within instantiated and the return object added as properties of foo().

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3  
It is confusing and misleading to call this a "closure". Although opinions differ on the precise meaning returning an ojbect value from a function does not constitute a closure in anyone's book. –  torazaburo Sep 6 '14 at 17:17

You could do it like this

var a, b
var foo = {
    a: a = 5,
    b: b = 6,
    c: a + b
}

That method has proven useful to me when I had to refer to the object that a function was originally declared on. The following is a minimal example of how I used it:

function createMyObject() {
    var count = 0, self
    return {
        a: self = {
            log: function() {
                console.log(count++)
                return self
            }
        }
    }
}

By defining self as the object that contains the print function you allow the function to refer to that object. This means you will not have to 'bind' the print function to an object if you need to pass it somewhere else.

If you would, instead, use this as illustrated below

function createMyObject() {
    var count = 0
    return {
        a: {
            log: function() {
                console.log(count++)
                return this
            }
        }
    }
}

Then the following code will log 0, 1, 2 and then give an error

var o = createMyObject()
var log = o.a.log
o.a.log().log() // this refers to the o.a object so the chaining works
log().log() // this refers to the window object so the chaining fails!

By using the self method you guarantee that print will always return the same object regardless of the context in which the function is ran. The code above will run just fine and log 0, 1, 2 and 3 when using the self version of createMyObject().

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Good examples, except you've left out all the semicolons. –  torazaburo Sep 6 '14 at 17:18

You can do it using the module pattern. Just like:

var foo = function() {
  var that = {};

  that.a = 7;
  that.b = 6;

  that.c = function() {
    return that.a + that.b;
  }

  return that;
};
var fooObject = foo();
fooObject.c(); //13

With this pattern you can instantiate several foo objects according to your need.

http://jsfiddle.net/jPNxY/1/

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1  
This isn't an example of the module pattern, just a function. If the last line of the foo definition was }();, it would self execute and return an object, not a function. Also, foo.c is a function, so writing to it clobbers that function and the next invocation via fooObject.c() will fail. Maybe this fiddle is closer to what you're going for (it's also a singleton, not designed to be instantiated). –  Hollister Dec 26 '13 at 1:24
1  
"The Module pattern was originally defined as a way to provide both private and public encapsulation for classes in conventional software engineering". From: Learning JavaScript Design Patterns. That's object follow the module pattern described above but maybe it isn't the best one to explain that because is not showing public and private properties/methods. This one jsfiddle.net/9nnR5/2 is the same object with public and private properties/methods. So both of them are following this pattern –  Rafael Rocha Jan 16 '14 at 19:48
    
@Rafael, thanks for the DesignPatterns link. –  usefulBee Jul 22 at 15:45

There are several ways to accomplish this; this is what I would use:

function Obj() {
 this.a = 5;
 this.b = this.a + 1;
 // return this; // commented out because this happens automatically
}

var o = new Obj();
o.b; // === 6
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1  
This works, but eliminates the advantages of the object literal notation. –  kpozin Jan 15 '11 at 17:01
    
True, sorry I missed the object-literal tag originally. I mostly only use object literals for data structures, and anytime I want any additional logic (which might resemble a class) I create the object as the result of a function for this very reason. –  ken Jan 16 '11 at 0:16

Creating new function on your object literal and invoking a constructor seems a radical departure from the original problem, and it's unnecessary.

You cannot reference a sibling property during object literal initialization.

var x = { a: 1, b: 2, c: a + b } // not defined 
var y = { a: 1, b: 2, c: y.a + y.b } // not defined 

The simplest solution for computed properties follows (no heap, no functions, no constructor):

var x = { a: 1, b: 2 };

x.c = x.a + x.b; // apply computed property
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The other answers posted here are better but here's an alternative that:

  • Sets the value at initialization (not a getter, or derived, etc)
  • Doesn't require any type of init() or code outside of the object literal
  • Is an object literal and not a factory function or other object creation mechanic.
  • Shouldn't have any performance impact (except at initialization)

Self-executing anonymous functions and window storage

var foo = {
    bar:(function(){
        window.temp = "qwert";
        return window.temp;
    })(),
    baz: window.temp
};

The order is guaranteed (bar before baz).

It pollutes window of course, but I can't imagine someone writing a script that requires window.temp to be persistent. Maybe tempMyApp if you're paranoid.

It's also ugly but occasionally useful. An example is when you are using an API with rigid initialization conditions and don't feel like refactoring so the scoping is correct.

And it's dry, of course.

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The key to all this is SCOPE.

You need to encapsulate the "parent" (parent object) of the property you want to define as it's own instantiated object, and then you can make references to sibling properties using the key word this

It's very, very important to remember that if you refer to this without first so doing, then this will refer to the outer scope... which will be the window object.

var x = 9   //this is really window.x
var bar = {
  x: 1,
  y: 2,
  foo: new function(){
    this.a = 5, //assign value
    this.b = 6,
    this.c = this.a + this.b;  // 11
  },
  z: this.x   // 9 (not 1 as you might expect, b/c *this* refers `window` object)
};
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This is not even valid JS. –  torazaburo Sep 6 '14 at 17:19
    

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