Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a stored procedure in Oracle 9i which inserts records in a table. The table has a primary key built to ensure duplicte rows doesnot exists.

I am trying to insert a record by calling this stored procedure and it works first time properly. I am again trying to insert a duplicate record and expecting unique constraint violation error. But I am getting ORA-01401 inserted value too large for column

I knew its meaning but my query is , if the value inserted is really large then how it got successful in the first attempt.

Table is

CREATE TABLE KEY
(
  ID  VARCHAR2(25 BYTE),
  KEY         NUMBER(4)                      NOT NULL,
  INSERT_DATE    DATE,
  WORK_KEY    VARCHAR2(128 BYTE)
)

CREATE UNIQUE INDEX SACHINIDX ON KEY
(ID, KEY)

Call is EXEC SQL EXECUTE BEGIN keyadd(:id, :key, :wkey); END; END-EXEC;

Stored Procedure is

PROCEDURE keyadd(id IN VARCHAR2, key IN NUMBER, wkey IN VARCHAR2)
{
        BEGIN
        INSERT INTO KEY
            (   ID,
                KEY,
                INSERT_DATE,
                WORK_KEY)
            VALUES
            (
                id,
                key,
                SYSDATE,
                wkey
            );
        EXCEPTION
            ROLLBACK;
        COMMIT;
            RETURN;
        END;
}

First insert sqlca.sqlcode is [0] Second insert sqlca.sqlcode is [-1401]

share|improve this question
    
Are there any triggers on the table that could be messing with the values? –  kurosch Jan 6 '11 at 15:50
    
Can you show us a small test case that reproduces this behaviour? –  Rob van Wijk Jan 6 '11 at 15:58
    
Please also show the stored procedure and the call. –  Rob van Wijk Jan 6 '11 at 16:07
    
Added please check –  Sachin Chourasiya Jan 6 '11 at 16:16
    
What are the values for wkey in the first and the second call? –  a_horse_with_no_name Jan 6 '11 at 16:25

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted
CREATE TABLE KEY
(
  ID  VARCHAR2(25 BYTE),
  KEY         NUMBER(4)                      NOT NULL,
  INSERT_DATE    DATE,
  WORK_KEY    VARCHAR2(128 BYTE)
);

CREATE UNIQUE INDEX SACHINIDX ON KEY
(ID, KEY);


create or replace PROCEDURE keyadd(id IN VARCHAR2, key IN NUMBER, wkey IN VARCHAR2)
is
        BEGIN
        INSERT INTO KEY
            (   ID,
                KEY,
                INSERT_DATE,
                WORK_KEY)
            VALUES
            (
                id,
                key,
                SYSDATE,
                wkey
            );

        COMMIT;

--      EXCEPTION when others then
--          ROLLBACK;
end keyadd;
/

begin
  keyadd('one', 1, '59FC9AD0FA5A8932836824B0489B73252C120301A2205154C096B4EB213FA983D5E500B62A469439');
  keyadd('one', 1, '905BD61AAEC986ACF887DBA7C04D650B61A8818ABEBE1720D810B4A426EB9220558B530D5119315F');
end;
/

gives me the expected ORA-00001: Unique Constraint... error, not an ORA-01401. So, without further information its impossible to help.

share|improve this answer

I don't know the language the procedure was written in, but this part:

     EXCEPTION
         ROLLBACK;
     COMMIT;
         RETURN; 

raises my eyebrows. Two questions:

  • What is this supposed to do?

  • Is your issue solved when you remove those lines?

share|improve this answer
    
Whats wrong in these two lines ? And why they needs to be removed –  Sachin Chourasiya Jan 6 '11 at 16:31
    
First of all, you need a WHEN clause after the EXCEPTION keyword. Secondly, there is no purpose in committing immediately after a rollback. I doubt this is directly related to your error, but clearly the code you've shown is not the actual code. –  Dave Costa Jan 6 '11 at 16:53
1  
The curly brackets look a bit odd too... –  Alex Poole Jan 6 '11 at 17:41
1  
@Sachin: Still waiting for an answer. And maybe this is some extremely poorly copied PL/SQL? –  Rob van Wijk Jan 6 '11 at 18:45
    
You are correct, let me get the correct copy. Thanks Rob –  Sachin Chourasiya Jan 6 '11 at 19:27

My best guess is on your second try, you are providing a value for one of the other columns that is too large. Looks like this error will supersede the primary key violation.

share|improve this answer
    
All the values are same expect the last column.For the first call its 59FC9AD0FA5A8932836824B0489B73252C120301A2205154C096B4EB213FA983D5E500B62A469439 and for second its 905BD61AAEC986ACF887DBA7C04D650B61A8818ABEBE1720D810B4A426EB9220558B530D5119315F . I cant see any difference in length. :( –  Sachin Chourasiya Jan 6 '11 at 17:16

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.