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I'm dealing with a COM port application and we have a defined variable-length packet structure that I'm talking to a micro-controller with. The packet has delimiters for the start and stop bytes. The trouble is that sometimes the read buffer can contain extraneous characters. It seems like I'll always get the whole packet, just some extra chatter before/after the actual data. So I have a buffer that I append data to whenever new data is received from the COM port. What is the best way to search this buffer for any possible occurrences of my packet? For example:

Say my packet delimiter is 0xFF and I have an array as such

{ 0x00, 0xFF, 0x02, 0xDA, 0xFF, 0x55, 0xFF, 0x04 }

How can I create a function/LINQ-statment that returns all subarrays that start and end with the delimiter (almost like a sliding-correlator with wildcards)?

The sample would return the following 3 arrays:

{0xFF, 0x02, 0xDA, 0xFF}, {0xFF, 0x55, 0xFF}, and
{0xFF, 0x02, 0xDA, 0xFF, 0x55, 0xFF}
share|improve this question
1  
I would've expected that the returned arrays to be {0x00} { 0x02, 0xDA} and {0x55}, but apart from that, if this represents the approximate actual array size, and the delimiter is only one byte long, why not go for a simple loop? It will probably outperform linq. –  Willem van Rumpt Jan 6 '11 at 16:11
    
@Willem: Yeah, agreed on all points. –  Amy Jan 6 '11 at 17:03
1  
@ Willem van Rumpt - I worded the question title with LINQ because that usually gets hits on SO, but in the question I specified "function/LINQ-statement" because I was aware of the very real possibility that an elegant LINQ solution would most likely take longer than a loop. I'm open to either, I just want whoever comes behind me in a year to know what I did besides the "// Decode packet here" in the code. –  Joel B Jan 6 '11 at 18:07
    
Ah ha. I missed the "function/LINQ-statement" phrase. Willem, Joel is staying one step ahead of us. –  Amy Jan 6 '11 at 18:20
    
@yodaj & Joel: Missed it (too) :) –  Willem van Rumpt Jan 6 '11 at 19:07

6 Answers 6

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Here's how you can do this using LINQ ...

int[] list = new int[] { 0x00, 0xFF, 0x02, 0xDA, 0xFF, 0x55, 0xFF, 0x04 };
int MAXLENGTH = 10;

var windows = list.Select((element, i) => list.Skip(i).Take(MAXLENGTH));
var matched = windows.Where(w => w.First() == 0xFF);
var allcombinations = matched.SelectMany(m => Enumerable.Range(1, m.Count())
          .Select(i => m.Take(i)).Where(x => x.Count() > 2 && x.Last() == 0xFF));

Or using indexes:

int length = list.Count();
var indexes = Enumerable.Range(0, length)
              .SelectMany(i => Enumerable.Range(3, Math.Min(length-i, MAXLENGTH))
              .Select(count => new {i, count}));
var results = indexes.Select(index => list.Skip(index.i).Take(index.count))
              .Where(x => x.First() == 0xFF && x.Last() == 0xFF);
share|improve this answer
    
Very nice. I like it. –  Amy Jan 6 '11 at 16:59
    
of your two variants, the 1st one (not using indexes) performed faster on my tests –  Joel B Jan 13 '11 at 15:17

While Trystan's answer is technically correct, he's making lots of copies of the original array all at once. If the starting array is large and has a bunch of delimiters, that gets huge quickly. This approach avoids the massive memory consumption by using only the original array and an array for the current segment being evaluated.

public static List<ArraySegment<byte>> GetSubArrays(this byte[] array, byte delimeter)
{
    if (array == null) throw new ArgumentNullException("array");

    List<ArraySegment<byte>> retval = new List<ArraySegment<byte>>();

    for (int i = 0; i < array.Length; i++)
    {
        if (array[i] == delimeter)
        {
            for (int j = i + 1; j < array.Length; j++)
            {
                if (array[j] == delimeter)
                {
                    retval.Add(new ArraySegment<byte>(array, i + 1, j - i - 1));
                }
            }
        }
    }

    return retval;
}

Can be used as such:

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    byte[] arr = new byte[] { 0x00, 0xFF, 0x02, 0xDA, 0xFF, 0x55, 0xFF, 0x04 };
    List<ArraySegment<byte>> retval = GetSubArrays(arr, 0xFF);

    // this also works (looks like LINQ):
    //List<ArraySegment<byte>> retval = arr.GetSubArrays(0xFF);

    byte[] buffer = new byte[retval.Select(x => x.Count).Max()];
    foreach (var x in retval)
    {
        Buffer.BlockCopy(x.Array, x.Offset, buffer, 0, x.Count);
        Console.WriteLine(String.Join(", ", buffer.Take(x.Count).Select(b => b.ToString("X2")).ToArray()));
    }


    Console.ReadLine();
}
share|improve this answer
3  
I didn't know about the ArraySegment. Very cool. –  Trystan Spangler Jan 6 '11 at 16:58
4  
Nice use of the little known ArraySegment. –  Ian Mercer Jan 6 '11 at 17:10
    
I think if (array[j] == delimeter) would cause an out of bounds error if the array ends with the delimeter. –  Trystan Spangler Jan 6 '11 at 17:14
    
Tested with { 0x00, 0xFF, 0x02, 0xDA, 0xFF, 0x55, 0xFF, 0x04, 0xFF }. I don't get an out of bounds error. What was your input? –  Amy Jan 6 '11 at 17:32
    
+1 - I looked at that ArraySegment on MSDN yesterday for this exact problem and was awestruck that I'd never seen anyone employ it before. I wonder why no one uses it? It seems somewhat helpful. –  Joel B Jan 6 '11 at 18:32

If you really want to use LINQ, this should work quite fast (even if not as fast as a good-old for loop):

public static IEnumerable<T[]> GetPackets<T>(this IList<T> buffer, T delimiter)
{
    // gets delimiters' indexes
    var delimiterIdxs = Enumerable.Range(0, buffer.Count())
                                  .Where(i => buffer[i].Equals(delimiter))
                                  .ToArray();

    // creates a list of delimiters' indexes pair (startIdx,endIdx)
    var dlmtrIndexesPairs = delimiterIdxs.Take(delimiterIdxs.Count() - 1)
                                         .SelectMany(
                                                     (startIdx, idx) => 
                                                     delimiterIdxs.Skip(idx + 1)
                                                                  .Select(endIdx => new { startIdx, endIdx })
                                                    );
    // creates array of packets
    var packets = dlmtrIndexesPairs.Select(p => buffer.Skip(p.startIdx)
                                                      .Take(p.endIdx - p.startIdx + 1)
                                                      .ToArray())
                                   .ToArray();

    return packets;
}
share|improve this answer

I wouldn't try to do this with linq so here's a regular method that returns the same output as you wanted.

public List<byte[]> GetSubArrays(byte[] array, byte delimeter)
{
  if (array == null) throw new ArgumentNullException("array");

  List<byte[]> subArrays = new List<byte[]>();

  for (int i = 0; i < array.Length; i++)
  {
    if (array[i] == delimeter && i != array.Length - 1)
    {
      List<byte> subList = new List<byte>() { delimeter };

      for (int j = i+1; j < array.Length; j++)
      {
        subList.Add(array[j]);
        if (array[j] == delimeter)
        {
          subArrays.Add(subList.ToArray());
        }
      }
    }
  }

  return subArrays;
}

If it must be an in-place lambda expression, then just change the first line to (byte[] array, byte delimeter) => (without the method modifiers and name) and call it that way.

share|improve this answer
    
The problem with this is the memory consumption can get very large if the original array is large and there are a lot of delimiters. See my answer, which uses an extension method. –  Amy Jan 6 '11 at 16:46

Although the delimiter structure seems a bit vague, I would not use linq and do something like below (no extensive tests performed). It will return all subsets (of bytes surrounded by the delimiter), without including the delimiter (it's a given anyway, why include it?). It also does not return the union of the results, but that can always be assembled manually.

public IEnumerable<byte[]> GetArrays(byte[] data, byte delimiter)
{
    List<byte[]> arrays = new List<byte[]>();
    int start = 0;
    while (start >= 0 && (start = Array.IndexOf<byte>(data, delimiter, start)) >= 0)
    {
        start++;
        if (start >= data.Length - 1)
        {
            break;
        }

        int end = Array.IndexOf<byte>(data, delimiter, start);
        if (end < 0)
        {
            break;
        }

        byte[] sub = new byte[end - start];
        Array.Copy(data, start, sub, 0, end - start);
        arrays.Add(sub);
        start = end;
    }

    return arrays;
}
share|improve this answer
    
This doesn't return the expected result set, which can contain nested segments (third result in the question). –  Amy Jan 6 '11 at 18:25
    
@yodaj: Aaaaaaaah! I thought the third result was the union of every single result. I was wondering why he would want to return it all :) That's why I wrote "It also does not return the union of the results, but that can always be assembled manually." –  Willem van Rumpt Jan 6 '11 at 19:06
    
Yeah. The unions could be assembled rather easily from your results using recursion. –  Amy Jan 6 '11 at 19:25

You could do this using a Linq aggregator, but it's much less straightforward than the other solutions suggested here, also had to add a special case to cover extending already completed arrays as you suggested above.

byte[] myArray = new byte[] { 0x00, 0xFF, 0x02, 0xDA, 0xFF, 0x55, 0xFF, 0x04 };
var arrayList = myArray.Aggregate(
                new { completedLists = new List<List<byte>>(), 
                      activeList = new List<byte>() },
                (seed, s) =>
                {
                    if (s == 0xFF)
                    {
                        if (seed.activeList.Count == 0)
                        {
                            seed.activeList.Add(s);
                        }
                        else
                        {
                            seed.activeList.Add(s);
                            var combinedLists = new List<List<byte>>();

                            foreach (var l in seed.completedLists)
                            {
                                var combinedList = new List<byte>(l);
                                combinedList.AddRange(seed.activeList.Skip(1));
                                combinedLists.Add(combinedList);
                            }
                            seed.completedLists.AddRange(combinedLists);
                            seed.completedLists.Add(new List<byte>(seed.activeList));
                            seed.activeList.Clear();
                            seed.activeList.Add(s);
                        }
                    }
                    else
                    {
                        if (seed.activeList.Count > 0)
                            seed.activeList.Add(s);
                    }
                    return seed;
                }).completedLists;
share|improve this answer
    
Does not compile on this line: seed.completedLists.Add(new List<int>(seed.activeList)); –  Amy Jan 6 '11 at 16:57
    
I changed it from using List<int> to List<byte> and forgot that one line. Hardly a reason to down vote, especially because it's that obvious. Anyway, fixed now. –  BrokenGlass Jan 7 '11 at 3:22

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