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I want to change a couple of files at one time, iff I can write to all of them. I'm wondering if I somehow can combine the multiple open calls with the with statement:

try:
  with open('a', 'w') as a and open('b', 'w') as b:
    do_something()
except IOError as e:
  print 'Operation failed: %s' % e.strerror

If that's not possible, what would an elegant solution to this problem look like?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 166 down vote accepted

As of Python 2.7 (or 3.1 respectively) you can write

with open('a', 'w') as a, open('b', 'w') as b:
    do_something()

In earlier versions of Python, you can sometimes use contextlib.nested() to nest context managers. This won't work as expected for opening multiples files, though -- see the linked documentation for details.

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Yes .. so cool that a few lines of code allow doing that in previous python versions as well, as in this example here: metapython.blogspot.com/2010/12/… –  jsbueno Jan 6 '11 at 19:34
    
I don't see a contextlib.nested() in the provided link. :( I think this is what you want: docs.python.org/library/contextlib.html#contextlib.nested –  weronika Sep 1 '11 at 20:47
1  
Unfortunately, according to the contextlib.nested docs, you shouldn't use it for file opening: "using nested() to open two files is a programming error as the first file will not be closed promptly if an exception is thrown when opening the second file." –  weronika Sep 1 '11 at 20:49
4  
is there a way to use with to open a variable list of files? –  monkut Apr 10 '13 at 0:29
4  
@monkut: Very good question (you could actually ask this as a separate question). Short answer: Yes, there is ExitStack as of Python 3.3. There is no easy way of doing this in any earlier version of Python. –  Sven Marnach Apr 10 '13 at 11:38

Just replace and with , and you're done:

try:
    with open('a', 'w') as a, open('b', 'w') as b:
        do_something()
except IOError as e:
    print 'Operation failed: %s' % e.strerror
share|improve this answer
3  
+1 to the except block ;) –  Ant Jan 6 '11 at 17:18

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