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I've got some XML, stored in a table. I know what object it is supposed to Deserialize to, but I have many types of objects.

So, I've got this code, and it works, but it is very specific to 1 type of object. I want to make it generic to accept one of many types of object.

Type _type = typeof(ReynoldsRCI.Services.rey_SvcApptView)

XmlSerializer ser = new XmlSerializer(_type);
object sck;

using (StringReader reader = new StringReader(_msg.RawText))
{
   using (XmlTextReader xreader = new XmlTextReader(reader))
   {
      sck = ser.Deserialize(xreader);
   }
}

However, what I would LOVE to have is a 1 line method call where I pass it the type of object and the text, and it would deserialize it and return it to the caller for use. But I am completely an idiot when it comes to generics, so the code I have just isn't even compiling.

public T DoStuff<T>(T _type, string RawText)
{
   // Doesn't like this line.  Error "The best overloaded method match for 'System.Xml.Serialization.XmlSerializer.XmlSerializer(System.Type)' has some invalid arguments"
   XmlSerializer ser = new XmlSerializer(_type);
   object retObj;

   using (StringReader reader = new StringReader(RawText))
   {
      using (XmlTextReader xreader = new XmlTextReader(reader))
      {
         retObj = ser.Deserialize(xreader);
      }
   }

   // Doesn't like this line, either "The type or namespace name '_type' could not be found"
   return (_type)retObj;
}

I'm obviously missing something basic when it comes to Generics, and I can't piece it together. Can someone help me out with a quick pointer?

share|improve this question
2  
Try return (T)retObj; –  Michal Franc Jan 6 '11 at 16:20

3 Answers 3

up vote 13 down vote accepted

To get the type of T, you need to say typeof(T). And at the end of your method, to cast retObj to an instance of T, you must say (T)retObj. Therefore

public T DoStuff<T>(string RawText) {
    XmlSerializer ser = new XmlSerializer(typeof(T));
    // details elided
    return (T)retObj;
}

The point is that T is playing the role of int, or string, or Foo or whatever. That is, it is the name of a type, and not an instance of System.Type. Thus, you can use it just like you would use the names of those other types. So

new XmlSerializer(typeof(T));

is analogous to

new XmlSerializer(typeof(Foo));

and

return (T)retObj;

is analogous to

return (Foo)retObj;

Think of T as a placeholder for a concrete type. The key here is to understand the difference between Foo and typeof(Foo) (or, said a little differently, types like Foo and instances of System.Type like typeof(Foo)).

share|improve this answer
    
It's annoying that XmlSerializer doesn't have a generics-based method, I've had to do something like this several times now –  Chris S Jan 6 '11 at 16:24
    
@Chris S: You can write your own factory that handles the problem in the blink of an eye. Here's a start: class XmlSerializerFactory { public XmlSerializer CreateXmlSerializer<T>() { return new XmlSerializer(typeof(T)); } }. Usage: var factory = new XmlSerializerFactory(); XmlSerializer serializer = factory.CreateXmlSerializer<Foo>();. –  Jason Jan 6 '11 at 16:26
    
Okay, yeah, I'm an idiot. I didn't need to pass in the type, since I'm specifying when calling it. Thanks for the help with the syntax. –  Matt Jan 6 '11 at 17:04

You're mixing up generic type parameters and "normal" parameters.

public T DoStuff<T>(string RawText)
{ 
    XmlSerializer ser = new XmlSerializer(typeof(T));
    object retObj;

    using (StringReader reader = new StringReader(RawText))
    {
        using (XmlTextReader xreader = new XmlTextReader(reader))
        {
            retObj = ser.Deserialize(xreader);
        }
    }

     return (T)retObj;
}

Do note that there is no way the compiler could possibly infer the type argument, so you'll have to use it as

string xml = ...;
Foo foo = DoStuff<Foo>(xml);

On another note:

  1. Consider renaming the method to XmlDeserialize or similar.
  2. Consider making this an extension-method on string.
share|improve this answer
    
I will DEFINITELY be renaming it. I always start out code that I am uncertain about with ridiculous names so that I have to change them later when I REALLY know what they are doing. Otherwise I'm likely to give a name like "GetObjectFromString", and then change the purpose of the method while investigating, and then never change it to be what it should be called. –  Matt Jan 6 '11 at 16:33

There is already a good answer but I already wrote this for you so I'm going to add it anyway. I used LinqPad to write it so Dump() is short for Console.Writeline().

void Main()
{
    Testo testo = new Testo { First = "Phillip" };
    var abc = Serialize<Testo>(testo);
    abc.ToString().Dump();
}

public XDocument Serialize<T>(T obj)
{
    var builder = new System.Text.StringBuilder();
    var settings = new XmlWriterSettings
                       {
                           Encoding = System.Text.Encoding.UTF8,
                           Indent = true,
                           IndentChars = ("\t"),
                           OmitXmlDeclaration = false
                       };

    var serializer = new XmlSerializer(typeof(T));

    using (var writer = XmlWriter.Create(builder, settings))
    {
        serializer.Serialize(writer, obj);
    }

    var xml = new XDocument(new XDeclaration("1.0", "UTF-8", "yes"), XElement.Parse(builder.ToString()));

    return xml;
}

public class Testo
{
    public string First;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the time Phillip. I can't upvote any answers since I can't login with OpenID (work screws up OpenID on this site -- curiously, not on other OpenID sites.) –  Matt Jan 6 '11 at 17:17

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