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The following method shows up as leaking while performing a memory-leaks test with Instruments:

- (NSDictionary*) initSigTrkLstWithNiv:(int)pm_SigTrkNiv SigTrkSig:(int)pm_SigTrkSig SigResIdt:(int)pm_SigResIdt SigResVal:(int)pm_SigResVal {
 NSArray *objectArray;
 NSArray *keyArray;
 if (self = [super init]) {
  self.SigTrkNiv = [NSNumber numberWithInt:pm_SigTrkNiv];
  self.SigTrkSig = [NSNumber numberWithInt:pm_SigTrkSig];
  self.SigResIdt = [NSNumber numberWithInt:pm_SigResIdt];
  self.SigResVal = [NSNumber numberWithInt:pm_SigResVal];

  objectArray = [NSArray arrayWithObjects:SigTrkNiv,SigTrkSig,SigResIdt,SigResVal, nil];
  keyArray = [NSArray arrayWithObjects:@"SigTrkNiv", @"SigTrkSig", @"SigResIdt", @"SigResVal", nil];

  self = [NSDictionary dictionaryWithObjects:objectArray forKeys:keyArray];
 }
 return self;
}

code that invokes the instance:

   NSDictionary *lv_SigTrkLst = [[SigTrkLst alloc]initSigTrkLstWithNiv:[[tempDict objectForKey:@"SigTrkNiv"] intValue]
             SigTrkSig:[[tempDict objectForKey:@"SigTrkSig"]  intValue]
             SigResIdt:[[tempDict objectForKey:@"SigResIdt"]  intValue]
             SigResVal:[[tempDict objectForKey:@"SigResVal"]  intValue]];  
[[QBDataContainer sharedDataContainer].SigTrkLstArray addObject:lv_SigTrkLst];  
[lv_SigTrkLst release];

Instruments informs that 'SigTrkLst' is leaking. Even though I have released the instance? (I know that adding it to the array increments the retainCount by 1 but releasing it twice removes it from the array?)

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You are initializing the instance (self), but then replacing it with a dictionary. Assuming that is what you actually want to do (see part 2), you need to release the old self before assigning a new one, and then you must retain the new dictionary so that your init method preserves the retain count. Note that this code returns a NSDictionary object, when your calling code expects a SigTrkLst, which is almost certainly a bad idea.

- (NSDictionary*) initSigTrkLstWithNiv:(int)pm_SigTrkNiv
                             SigTrkSig:(int)pm_SigTrkSig
                             SigResIdt:(int)pm_SigResIdt
                             SigResVal:(int)pm_SigResVal {
    NSArray *objectArray;
    NSArray *keyArray;
    if (self = [super init]) {   
        self.SigTrkNiv = [NSNumber numberWithInt:pm_SigTrkNiv];
        self.SigTrkSig = [NSNumber numberWithInt:pm_SigTrkSig];
        self.SigResIdt = [NSNumber numberWithInt:pm_SigResIdt];
        self.SigResVal = [NSNumber numberWithInt:pm_SigResVal];
        objectArray = [NSArray arrayWithObjects:
                       SigTrkNiv,SigTrkSig,SigResIdt,SigResVal, nil];
        keyArray = [NSArray arrayWithObjects:
                       @"SigTrkNiv", @"SigTrkSig", @"SigResIdt", @"SigResVal", nil];

        [self release];
        self = [NSDictionary dictionaryWithObjects:objectArray forKeys:keyArray];
        [self retain];
    }
    return self;
}

Part 2: What is this supposed to do? Normally speaking, an -init... method should return an initialized class instance, starting from an allocated chunk of memory. The first part of your -init method looks right, other than the return value. For example, the following is a normal -init method:

- (id)initSigTrkLstWithNiv:(int)pm_SigTrkNiv
                 SigTrkSig:(int)pm_SigTrkSig
                 SigResIdt:(int)pm_SigResIdt
                 SigResVal:(int)pm_SigResVal {
    if (self = [super init]) {   
        self.SigTrkNiv = [NSNumber numberWithInt:pm_SigTrkNiv];
        self.SigTrkSig = [NSNumber numberWithInt:pm_SigTrkSig];
        self.SigResIdt = [NSNumber numberWithInt:pm_SigResIdt];
        self.SigResVal = [NSNumber numberWithInt:pm_SigResVal];
    }
    return self;
}
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SigTrkLst was meant as a subclass from NSDictionairy. I thought my code would therefore expect a dictionairy. I realize it was completely wrong, your explanation helped me see that. Your solution was valid too. –  Wolfert Jan 6 '11 at 17:17
self = [NSDictionary dictionaryWithObjects:objectArray forKeys:keyArray];

When you are doing this what is happening to the SigTrkLst object that self supposed to point? Don't are you loosing reference to SigTrkLst object that was allocated and pointed by self? That object is never released as after this line there is no reference to that.

Though it is technically possible for an init method to return an object of different type, most probably this is not most of the people want and might indicate a potential bug.

EDIT: It seems that you are missing some basics of memory management for iOS. I strongly request you to read Memory Management Programming Guide. This may save you from lots of troubles.

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I set self to NSDictionary type with "@interface SigTrkLst : NSDictionary", or is this not what you meant? –  Wolfert Jan 6 '11 at 16:46
    
This is not correct way. By calling dictionaryWithObject you are creating a new dictionary, not modifying the current SigTrkLst. –  taskinoor Jan 6 '11 at 16:49
    
I suggest you instead of making SigTrkLst a subclass of NSDictionary, just add a dictionary property to SigTrkLst like NSNumbers and then use self.myDict when you need that. –  taskinoor Jan 6 '11 at 16:50
    
I have changed the subclass to NSObject and added a NSDictionary property to the class as you suggested, it works fine. thanks! –  Wolfert Jan 6 '11 at 17:35

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