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Objects and variables created in a static member function are not considered 'local' as they would in a member function, so that they can now be shared amongst multiple threads right?

Whereas if you have a member function which creates some object, this would be local to the thread and therefore it is non-shared.

Am I correct in saying this?

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possible duplicate of static member function and thread-safety –  Suma Jan 6 '11 at 16:55
1  
Tony, why, on earth, are you asking the same question again? –  Suma Jan 6 '11 at 16:58
    
@Suma I voted to close my own question, forgot I asked this already... –  Tony The Lion Jan 7 '11 at 8:18
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5 Answers

up vote 11 down vote accepted

No you are not correct.

Objects created in a static function are not shared, (just like in any functions), unless they are declared static themselves (just like in any functions).

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There are at least 3 ways to create an object. X x; X* x = new X; X* x = new (mem) X. –  Maxim Yegorushkin Jan 6 '11 at 16:47
    
@Maxim and they would be shared only this way: static X x; static X* x = new X; What does your comment mean/imply ? it's vague !? –  Stephane Rolland Jan 6 '11 at 16:49
    
This: X* x = new (mem) X; can create an object shared between threads or processes. And it can be done from a static member function, which proves your statement "Objects created in a static function are not shared" wrong. –  Maxim Yegorushkin Jan 6 '11 at 17:27
    
@Maxim, I don't use X* x = new (mem) X; but there could be your same problem with X* x = new X;... however in such cases it wouldnt depend upon the difference between a static function and a non static function, which is IMHO what the novice asker has asked for in this question. –  Stephane Rolland Jan 6 '11 at 17:35
    
@Maxim: "Objects created in a static function" is referring to local/automatic objects only. E.g. void f() { int local_var; }. I understand your confusion, but it was readily apparent to me – and, I imagine, the majority – what is meant (though it should be spelled out for teaching, etc.). –  Fred Nurk Jan 6 '11 at 18:22
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Consider this class

class CData
{
public:
    static void func()
    {
        int a;
        static int b;
    }

    int c;
    static int d;
};

int main()
{
    CData::func();
}

Now variable 'a' is local to each call of func(). If two threads call func() at the same time, they get different versions of 'a'.

'b' is a static local. The value persists between different calls of func(). If two threads call func() at the same time, they access the same version of 'b' so they might need to do synchronisation.

'c' is an instance variable; it is attached to a particular instantiation of CData. func() cannot access 'c', except with a trick I'll show below.

'd' is a static variable. There is one instance of 'd' shared between all uses of class CData so synchronisation may be necessary. It can be used easily from the static function func().

The trick used to access instance data from a static function is to pass a valid object into the function.

e.g.

class CData
{
public:
    static void func(CData *p)
    {
        int a;
        static int b;

        b = p->c;
    }

    int c;
    static int d;
};

int main()
{
    CData data;
    CData::func(&data);
}

Hope that helps.

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Nice explanation dude! –  Meysam Aug 13 '11 at 6:50
1  
this is by far the best explanation I have seen. Thank you. Helped me a lot! –  AnyOneElse Sep 10 '13 at 11:46
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The only difference between member function and a static member function is that the former is passed a hidden extra argument, which you access using this keyword.

Hence, both member and static member function (as well as any regular function) can create objects where they please: on the thread's stack, in the heap, in memory with static storage duration or in shared memory.

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-1: That's not the only difference. The remainder of the question did not directly answer the OP. –  John Dibling Jan 6 '11 at 16:41
    
Some discussion of this starting from chat.stackoverflow.com/transcript/message/230968#230968. –  Fred Nurk Jan 6 '11 at 16:50
    
@John: care to elaborate? –  Maxim Yegorushkin Jan 6 '11 at 16:50
    
Clarification: A static member function can be called without an instance of the class. This might be what you intended to convey, but it should be clarified in a question such as this. –  John Dibling Jan 6 '11 at 16:51
    
Well, I fail to see the difference between your definition of static member function and mine. But I may be assuming an astute reader. –  Maxim Yegorushkin Jan 6 '11 at 17:12
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No you are not correct. And yes, C++ does very much overuse the word "static".

A static class member variable is of course a global with the class acting as a namespace scope and with some access privilege differences if it is private or protected (can only be accessed by the class).

However a static class member function is just like a regular free-function (not class member) and has its own local variables every time it is called.

The only real difference between a static class member function and a regular free-function, apart from its naming convention, is that it has access to private member functions of a class.

In addition a static class member function can be called from a template with a variable template parameter, invoking what is commonly called "compile-time polymorphism" and is commonly used in meta-programming.

A static "local" variable in any function is a single-instance, on the other hand, is also a bit like a global and is sensitive to thread-contention issues as two threads calling the function access the same instance.

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It does not matter if a function is static or not (class method). Only automatic variables can be seen as local to a function. If you have the address of those data, you may access it.

You can use e.g. thread-local storage to assign your output to a dedicated thread context.

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