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I currently have a concurrent queue implementation that uses a BlockingQueue as the data store. I now need to introduce a second type of object that has a higher priority, leading me towards a starvation/priority queue for the original queue. So we're working with objects of type A and type B being produced from multiple threads. Any objects of type B should be processed before those of type A, but other than that FIFO order MUST be maintained. So if { 1A, 1B, 2A, 3A, 2B } are inserted the order should be {1B, 2B, 1A, 2A, 3A}

I tried a single PriorityBlockingQueue to push type Bs to the front, but I couldn't maintain the FIFO requirement (there's no natural order between items of the same type).

My next thought is to use two concurrent queues. I'm looking for common gotchas or considerations when coordinating access between the two queues. Ideally, I'd want to do something like this:

   public void add(A a)
   {
       aQueue.add(a);
   }
   public void add(B b)
   {
       bQueue.add(b);
   }

   private void consume() 
   {
       if(!bQueue.isEmpty())
          process(bQueue.poll());
       else if(!aQueue.isEmpty())
          process(aQueue.poll());
   }

Would I need any synchronization or locks if both queues are ConcurrentLinkedQueue (or insert more appropriate structure here)? Note I have many producers, but only one consumer (single threaded ThreadPoolExecutor).

EDIT: If a B comes in after the isEmpty() check, it's ok to process an A and handle it on the next consume() call.

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3  
How important is it that a B object be processed before an A object? In your current code, if a B object is inserted after the isEmpty() call is made, you would miss it. There are two different answers, depending on what you must do... –  Jonathan B Jan 6 '11 at 16:55
    
@Jonathan Not vital. I meant to add that and somehow left it out. Question updated. –  Steve Jackson Jan 6 '11 at 17:01

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I am not sure if I got your situation right, but I think it should be possible to solve this using a single queue.

You said your objects (in the queue) should be comparable by natural order and type. If there is no natural order, simply have a sequence generator (i.e. AtomicLong) that will give your objects unique, always-incrementing queue ID. Getting data from AtomicLong should take no time, unless you're in the world of nanoseconds.

So your Comparator.compare should be like this:

1) check object type. If it is different (A VS B), return 1/-1. Otherwise, see below
2) check id. It is guaranteed to be different.

If you cannot change objects (A and B), you can still wrap them into another object which would contain that ID.

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My only concern with wrapping and using an increment is the sheer number of objects getting pushed through here. –  Steve Jackson Jan 6 '11 at 17:07
    
It's a trade-off :) You get the simplicity and lose some GC time. It all depends on the intensity of the queue, memory restrictions you have, etc. Do a measurement and decide... I would choose simplicity but I don't know the full context. –  mindas Jan 6 '11 at 17:10
    
I'm going to give this a go. I definitely trust the java concurrency devs over anything I'd put together. The existing implementation has been hammered in production for years and I'd hate to change it drastically. –  Steve Jackson Jan 6 '11 at 18:00
    
I also like that I can handle new types when they're inevitably added (Do C before A but after B - ack!) –  Steve Jackson Jan 6 '11 at 18:01

Based on your requirements your method here should work fine.

I would make the following change to your code. This would block on your getNextItem() until one of the queues returns an object for you.

private Object block = new Object();

public void add(A a)
{
    synchronized( block )
    {
        aQueue.add( a );
        block.notifyAll();
    }
}

public void add(B b)
{
    synchronized( block )
    {
        bQueue.add( b );
        block.notifyAll();
    }
}

private Object consume() 
{
    Object value = null
    synchroinzed( block )
    {
        while ( return == null )
        {
            value = bQueue.poll();
            if ( value == null ) value = aQueue.poll();
            if ( value == null ) block.wait();
        }
     }

   return value;
}
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Good implementation as well. I have other reasons for avoiding blocking in my case, but this looks good if my producer and consumers were a little less coupled. –  Steve Jackson Jan 6 '11 at 18:05

You need to synchronize a getQueueItem() method.

With A and B implementing QueueItem Interface.

   public void add(A a)
   {
       aQueue.add(a);
   }
   public void add(B b)
   {
       bQueue.add(b);
   }

   private void consume() 
   {
       process(getNextItem());
   }

    private QueueItem getNextItem()
    {
       synchronized(bQueue) {
          if(!bQueue.isEmpty()) return bQueue.poll();
          return aQueue.poll();
       }
    }
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the answer. I'm going to try the single queue suggested by @mindas, but I may end up coming back to the two queues. –  Steve Jackson Jan 6 '11 at 18:01

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