Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Is it possible to call a function defined in a non-specialised template class from a specialised template class? Here is an example of what i am attempting:

template <typename T>
struct Convert
{
 static inline void toString(unsigned num, unsigned places, std::string& str) { ... }
};

template <>
struct Convert<int8_t>
{
 static inline void toString(unsigned num, std::string& str)
 {
   Convert<int8_t>::toString(num, digitis(num), str);
 }
};

GCC complains that it can't see the non-specialised class function; i.e. I guess it only looks within the specialised class.

Any thoughts?

EDIT

Here is a more concrete example from my code (with a possible solution):

struct NonSpecial { };

template <typename T>
class Convert
{

        template <typename R>
        static inline R fromString(const register char *str, const unsigned str_len)
        {   
            R result = 0;
            //convert str to R
            return result;
        }

        friend class Convert<int8_t>;
        friend class Convert<uint8_t>;
}

template <>
struct Convert<int8_t>     
{
    static inline int8_t fromString(const register char* str, const unsigned str_len = 4)
    {
        Convert<NonSpecial>::fromString<int8_t>(str, str_len);    
    }
};

template <>
struct Convert<uint8_t>     
{
    static inline uint8_t fromString(const register char* str, const unsigned str_len = 3)
    {
        Convert<NonSpecial>::fromString<uint8_t>(str, str_len);    
    }
};

I have other functions - toString(), countDigits(), etc. I have chosen this approach so I can keep the same function names for each type (i.e. don't need toStringU32(), toString32, etc.). I considered template specialization but I don't believe this is possible.

share|improve this question
1  
Why are you trying to call the non-specialized version from the specialized version of the function? In other words, if all you are doing is calling the non-specialized version, why do you need it to be specialized? –  Zac Howland Jan 6 '11 at 17:13
    
the type T has no bearing on the static method - why is it in there in the first place? This looks like a case of template abuse, why don't you simply have overloaded free functions? –  Nim Jan 6 '11 at 17:25
    
Updated post with more concrete example. –  Graeme Jan 6 '11 at 18:07
    
@Zac: there are good reasons to do that. For example, different types often require the same basic processing and just need a type-specific pre- and post-processing. Calling the non-specialized version is a bit like calling the base class method in a virtual method (also often legitimate). –  Konrad Rudolph Jan 9 '11 at 21:33
    
@Konrad: I get that, but in his example, all he is doing is calling the non-specialized version. –  Zac Howland Jan 10 '11 at 13:15

1 Answer 1

up vote 8 down vote accepted

In general, this isn’t possible.

There are different possible solutions but they “cheat”. The first is to hoist off the actual default logic into a different function that is not specialized. Now you can call this function from both toString implementations.

The second alternative entails inheriting from the non-specialized class and passing a special tag as the template argument:

struct BaseClassTag { };

template <>
struct Convert<int8_t> : public Convert<BaseClassTag>
{
 typedef Convert<BaseClassTag> TBase;
 static inline void toString(unsigned num, std::string& str)
 {
   TBase::toString(num, digitis(num), str);
 }
};
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.