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What I need to do is order them from Classroom, Laboratories, Lecture Halls followed by Auditoriums. What I then need to do is to arrange them by their ID. So for the classrooms, I start from 1 and ascend accordingly.

The only fields I utilize are the roomID and the type column. (Should change type seeing as how it is an SQL function huh?)

SELECT * 
  FROM `rooms` 
ORDER BY CASE WHEN `type` = 'Classroom'
    THEN 1 
  WHEN `type` = 'Computer laboratory'
    THEN 2 
  WHEN `type` = 'Lecture Hall'
    THEN 3 
  WHEN `type` = 'Auditorium'
    THEN 4 
  END

It seems simple enough, but I can't get it to work. So, any help would be greatly appreciated, especially since this is probable a stupid question.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

What it seems like you should do is put that case statement into your query fields and give it an alias. Then set your order by statement to use that alias.

SELECT *,
CASE
WHEN type = 'Classroom' THEN 1
WHEN type = 'Computer laboratory' THEN 2
WHEN type = 'Lecture Hall' THEN 3
WHEN type = 'Auditorium' THEN 4
END AS ClassTypeValue
FROM rooms
ORDER BY ClassTypeValue

If I remember correctly this should work.

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+1 @spinon you're probably right but I suspect this doesn't work the same across different dBs. e.g. some where yours is required and some where Syed Abdul Rahman's is –  Conrad Frix Jan 6 '11 at 17:18
    
It works! The last line should be ORDER BY roomID, but thanks. So if I need to order anything by ASC or DESC, I'd have to 'group' the other CASE first. –  Syed Abdul Rahman Jan 6 '11 at 17:18
    
@conrad you are probably right. There was no tag as to what db he was working with so I just threw it out there as a possibility. –  spinon Jan 6 '11 at 17:21
    
Still, it was a very quick reply that worked. I don't understand the problems/conflicts on the DBs though. –  Syed Abdul Rahman Jan 6 '11 at 17:26
    
Glad it worked. Just some db's have different ways that you write sql statements. There could be a problem with the statement on some dbs but obviously you don't have that problem so great. No need to worry about it. –  spinon Jan 6 '11 at 19:23

Just in case spinon's answer doesn't work for you can always make it an in-line view

SELECT * 
FROM
(

    SELECT *,
        CASE
        WHEN type = 'Classroom' THEN 1
        WHEN type = 'Computer laboratory' THEN 2
        WHEN type = 'Lecture Hall' THEN 3
        WHEN type = 'Auditorium' THEN 4
        END AS ClassTypeValue
    FROM rooms
) t
ORDER BY ClassTypeValue
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So this code in a sense creates a new column that shows which CASE they are in? –  Syed Abdul Rahman Jan 6 '11 at 17:23
    
@Syed Abdul Rahman. Both approaches do this. The main difference is that this makes sure that ClassTypeValue will be recognized by the ORDER BY. One minor advantage which you may not care about, the ClassTypeValue doesn't have to appear in the SELECT. –  Conrad Frix Jan 6 '11 at 17:51
SELECT *
FROM
    (
    SELECT *,
        CASE
        WHEN type = 'Classroom' THEN 1
        WHEN type = 'Computer laboratory' THEN 2
        WHEN type = 'Lecture Hall' THEN 3
        WHEN type = 'Auditorium' THEN 4
        END AS ClassTypeValue
    FROM rooms
    ) t
ORDER BY ClassTypeValue, maxppl, roomID

This is the final query of which I used. Thanks guys for helping me and explaining it to me.

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