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I'm new to lambda expressions, and just ran into something I don't understand.

I have an object like so:

class MyListItem
{
   string date; //date in the format "2010-12-05"
   int Hour;    //hour of day as an int

}

I have a list of these objects, representing some dates and hours.

I want to sort this list by date and hour, so I try this:

List<MyListItem> myList = new List<MyListItem>();

myList = getsomedata(); //populate list

myList.Sort((a, b) => (a.date + a.Hour.ToString()).CompareTo(b.date + b.Hour.ToString()));

and that works, sort of. The issues is that the hour is an int, so it's sometimes not 2 digits, resulting in a sort like so:

2010-12-05 1
2010-12-05 10
2010-12-05 11
2010-12-05 12
2010-12-05 13
2010-12-05 2
2010-12-05 21
2010-12-05 22

I want it to be like:

2010-12-05 1
2010-12-05 2
2010-12-05 10
2010-12-05 11
2010-12-05 12
2010-12-05 13
2010-12-05 21
2010-12-05 22

so I try formatting the string to add a zero before I parse together in the lambda:

ret.Sort((a, b) => (a.date + a.Hour.ToString("00")).CompareTo(b.date + b.Hour.ToString("00")));

But it won't compile. It tells me:

Cannot convert lambda expression to type 'Systems.Collections.Generic.IComparer<MyListItem>' because it is not a delegate type. 

Huh? What is different between the plain .ToString() (with no format string) and .ToString("00") in this situation?

Also, any suggestions as to how to get this working?

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What's the type of ret? When I make it List<MyListItem>, I get no compilation issues with the second sort routine. For reproducibility, what version of the compiler and framework are you using? –  Ani Jan 6 '11 at 18:34
    
Strange that you get no compile errors. ret is a List<MyListItem>() (should have been myList, cut & paste error). I'm using vs2010, .net 4.0. –  BDW Jan 6 '11 at 20:13
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6 Answers

I'm not at a PC so I can't explain the first, but I'd sidestep it:

ret.Sort((a,b) => {
    int result = string.Compare(a.date,b.date);
    if(result==0) result = a.hour.CompareTo(b.hour);
    return result;
});

Less string creations, no parsing overheads, etc ;)

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The reason is because it's not sorting ordinally but as a string. You need to create a comparer to compare the dates. Look at the sort - anything starting with a 1 precedes anything starting with a 2, thus you'll get: 1, 11, 111, 1111, 2, 22, 222, 222, 3, 33, 333 etc.

Try converting the resulting string to a date, that should fix it.

DateTime.ParseExact(a.date + hour.ToString("00"), "yyyy-MM-dd HH", CultureInfo.InvariantCulture)

Should sidestep the compilation issue regarding the exception caused by the ToString().

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What does this have to with the compilation issue? –  Ani Jan 6 '11 at 18:33
1  
@Ani: I think this answer suggests a better technique to solve the OP problem. –  VoodooChild Jan 6 '11 at 18:35
1  
The date is sortable "as is" - "yyyy mm dd" is fine to sort without having to parse; and the OP is already trying to take steps to address the hour in a way that is validly sortable as a string... –  Marc Gravell Jan 6 '11 at 18:36
    
Nothing to do with the compilation issue, but everything to do with the sort issue. –  BenAlabaster Jan 6 '11 at 18:39
1  
Yes, but the OP already notes that in the question - it is his attempt to fix it that isn't working (or even compiling) –  Marc Gravell Jan 6 '11 at 18:41
show 1 more comment

I can see your code above working perfectly fine with and without formatting. I see no reason for such wrong behaviour

 List<MyListItem> myList = new List<MyListItem>();

        getsomedata(myList); //populate list

        myList.Sort((a, b) => (a.date + a.Hour.ToString("00")).CompareTo(b.date + b.Hour.ToString("00")));

    private void getsomedata(List<MyListItem> items)
    {
        for (int i = 1; i < 30; i += 3)
        {
            items.Add(new MyListItem("2010-12-05", i));
        }
        for (int i = 2; i < 30; i += 3)
        {
            items.Add(new MyListItem("2010-12-05", i));
        }
    }

    class MyListItem
    {
        public MyListItem(string date, int hour) { this.date = date; this.Hour = hour; }
        public string date; //date in the format "2010-12-05"
        public int Hour;    //hour of day as an int
    }
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It is because the dates are being compared in their String form.

Change your lambda call to as follows:

ret.Sort((a, b) => (DateTime.Parse(a.date + " " +a.Hour.ToString("00")  
+ ":00:00").CompareTo(DateTime.Parse(b.date  + " " + b.Hour.ToString("00") + ":00:00")));
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And "yyyy mm dd hh" etc is fine to sort as a string. –  Marc Gravell Jan 6 '11 at 18:39
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You could get crazy and make an extension method that returns a DateTime, combining the existing fields - then just sort on that.

Said logic could also be used directly in the sort expression as well, but then you don't get to use an extension method :)

public static DateTime GetDate(this MyListItem myListItem) { return DateTime.Parse(myListItem.date).AddHours(myListItem.Hour); }

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up vote 0 down vote accepted

Thanks to everyone who helped. As it turns out, the issue was that in the original class, the hour was are nullable, like so:

class MyListItem
{
   string date; //date in the format "2010-12-05"
   int? Hour;    //hour of day as an int

}

The real class I'm using is a generated class that is much larger than the example I gave here - I tried to shorten it up to clarify things, and ended up leaving out the relevant part.

Changing the sort to use the value of the nullable int works:

myList.Sort((a, b) => (a.date + a.Hour.Value.ToString("00")).CompareTo(b.date + b.Hour.Value.ToString("00")));

The error message wasn't much help there, but everyone's working examples allowed me to track it down.

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