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I have a templated function for returning the number of digits in a number:

    template <typename R>
    static inline unsigned count(const R num)
    {
        if(num < 10)                    return 1;
        else if (num < 100)             return 2;
        else if (num < 1000)            return 3;
        else if (num < 10000)           return 4;
        else if (num < 100000)          return 5;
        else if (num < 1000000)         return 6;
        else if (num < 10000000)        return 7;
        else if (num < 100000000)       return 8;
        else if (num < 1000000000)      return 9;
        else if (num < 10000000000ULL)          return 10;
        else if (num < 100000000000ULL)         return 11;
        else if (num < 1000000000000ULL)        return 12;
        else if (num < 10000000000000ULL)       return 13;
        else if (num < 100000000000000ULL)      return 14;
        else if (num < 1000000000000000ULL)     return 15;
        else if (num < 10000000000000000ULL)    return 16;
        else if (num < 100000000000000000ULL)   return 17;
        else if (num < 1000000000000000000ULL)  return 18;
        else if (num < 10000000000000000000ULL) return 19;
        else                                    return 20;
    }

However when I compile (GCC) I get the following warning:

warning: comparison is always true due to limited range of data type

I understand why I get this repeatedly but I'm not sure how to suppress/avoid it.

Any thoughts?

share|improve this question
    
While not an answer to the question, you can look at the solutions in this similar question. I don't think the log solutions would be good, but the ones like SLaks answer here are probably fast. –  Mark Wilkins Jan 6 '11 at 18:42
2  
Maybe you should use the standard facilities instead of calculating manually. How about count = (int)log10(num) + 1; –  Gene Bushuyev Jan 6 '11 at 18:56

11 Answers 11

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If you don't care about user-defined integer types (and evidence suggests that you don't care about negative values, either), just define one function which takes the largest type that you care about:

inline unsigned count(unsigned long long num){
    if(num < 10)                    return 1;
    else if (num < 100)             return 2;
    // blah blah
    else return 20;
}

If you call it with a signed short or whatever, you won't get any warnings about the implicit conversion, since it's a widening.

static_cast<unsigned>(log10(num)) + 1 is also worth profiling.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, I've gone with a binary search with a uint64_t arg. –  Graeme Jan 10 '11 at 15:00

You can avoid the warning be rewriting your method as

unsigned long long max = 10;
int order = 1;
while(num >= max && max * 10 > max) {
    max *= 10;
    order++;
}
return order;

I don't know whether this would be faster or slower.

share|improve this answer
    
This would be slower given you have to calculate the value on each call to the function. –  Graeme Jan 6 '11 at 18:37
2  
@Graeme: Not necessarily. Those branches you got there are quite expensive, and they're not even binary sorted. –  Puppy Jan 6 '11 at 18:39
    
There is one decision per digit in my lookup solution, this solution has 1 per loop (loop condition) as well as a multiplcation and post-increment. –  Graeme Jan 6 '11 at 18:43
1  
@Graeme: Except this solution's instructions are all loaded at once, whereas yours all have to be loaded and executed separately. Get a profiler. –  Puppy Jan 6 '11 at 18:57
2  
Re perf: seriously, is this your bottleneck? The two approaches have asymptotic run time complexity (linear in both cases); the loop the added benefit of being fixed code size O(1) rather than O(lg(max)) with the conditional chain. –  Aaron Jan 6 '11 at 19:42

-Wtype-limits warnings can be suppressed case-by-case by wrapping comparisons with constants into a dummy binary function, which accepts operands to be compared. In this case the code above can be transformed into something like:

// Dummy function, which suppresses -Wtype-limits warnings
// where appropriate.
template <typename R>
static inline bool dummy_less(const R a, const R b)
{
  return (a < b);
}

template <typename R>
static inline unsigned count(const R num)
{
    if (dummy_less(num, 10))        return 1;
    else if (dummy_less(num, 100))  return 2;
    // ...
    else                            return 20;
}

The compiler should easily propagate constants into dummy functions.

share|improve this answer
    
This is a great way to do it. Why is the warning suppressed in dummy_less(), but not when we put the condition in count()? –  David Steinhauer Sep 20 '13 at 19:17

You could specialize or overload count() for types that aren't as large as unsigned long long.

share|improve this answer
    
I currently do this, i.e. an overload for uint8, uint16, uint32 and uint64. I'm looking to consolidate into a single function. –  Graeme Jan 6 '11 at 18:39

Apparently the type of your data (R) has smaller size than some of your constants in if()'s B.t.w. wouldn't it be better to have while(num/10) loop?

Example,

template <typename R>
unsigned count(R num)
{
    size_t i = 0;
    while(num /= 10)
        ++i;
    return i;
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1: while ( num /= 10 ) ++count; is a great construct for this case! –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Jan 6 '11 at 18:39
    
This needs to be performant, a lookup is alot quicker than calculating on every call when you have a small finite set of possible return values; i.e. in the range 1 to 20. –  Graeme Jan 6 '11 at 18:40
1  
Division is more expensive than multiplication. –  SLaks Jan 6 '11 at 18:43
    
@Graeme -- performance? -- maybe, but rather unlikely, have you profiled to prove it's a bottleneck? –  Gene Bushuyev Jan 6 '11 at 18:45
    
@SLaks -- that was long time ago. Since Pentium, processors have multiple pipelines and capable of doing several instructions per cycle. Performance in such code is all about memory, not about processor. –  Gene Bushuyev Jan 6 '11 at 19:02

You could add the -Wno-type-limits to disable that specific warning. However, since it's a template function, you can't isolate that warning flag to a particular translation unit, so you'd have to enable that flag for your entire project, which may be undesirable.

share|improve this answer

May be a static_cast would help (yes it looks horrid, but this approach hmm...)?

    else if (static_cast<unsigned long long>(num) < 10000000000ULL)          return 10;
    else if (static_cast<unsigned long long>(num) < 100000000000ULL)         return 11;
    else if (static_cast<unsigned long long>(num) < 1000000000000ULL)        return 12;
    else if (static_cast<unsigned long long>(num) < 10000000000000ULL)       return 13;
    else if (static_cast<unsigned long long>(num) < 100000000000000ULL)      return 14;
    else if (static_cast<unsigned long long>(num) < 1000000000000000ULL)     return 15;
    else if (static_cast<unsigned long long>(num) < 10000000000000000ULL)    return 16;
    else if (static_cast<unsigned long long>(num) < 100000000000000000ULL)   return 17;
    else if (static_cast<unsigned long long>(num) < 1000000000000000000ULL)  return 18;
    else if (static_cast<unsigned long long>(num) < 10000000000000000000ULL) return 19;

etc.

share|improve this answer

Perhaps generate the right amount of comparisons at compile-time?

#include <limits>

template <class T, int power>
struct pow10
{
    static const T value = 10 * pow10<T, power - 1>::value;
};

template <class T>
struct pow10<T, 0>
{
    static const T value = 1;
};

template <class T, int power_of_ten, bool recurse>
struct digit_counter
{
    unsigned count(T value) const
    {
        if (value < pow10<T, power_of_ten>::value) return power_of_ten;
        else return digit_counter<T, power_of_ten + 1, power_of_ten < std::numeric_limits<T>::digits10>().count(value);
    }
};

template <class T, int power_of_ten>
struct digit_counter<T, power_of_ten, false>
{
    unsigned count(T ) const
    {
        return   std::numeric_limits<T>::digits10 + 1;
    }
};

template <class T>
unsigned count(T value)
{
    return digit_counter<T, 1, (std::numeric_limits<T>::digits10 > 1)>().count(value);
}

When optimized, it should yield pretty much identical binary to the original.

share|improve this answer
// Beware. brain-compiled code ahead!
namespace {
  inline unsigned count_long_long(unsigned long long num)
    if (num < 10000000000ULL)          return 10;
    else if (num < 100000000000ULL)         return 11;
    else if (num < 1000000000000ULL)        return 12;
    else if (num < 10000000000000ULL)       return 13;
    else if (num < 100000000000000ULL)      return 14;
    else if (num < 1000000000000000ULL)     return 15;
    else if (num < 10000000000000000ULL)    return 16;
    else if (num < 100000000000000000ULL)   return 17;
    else if (num < 1000000000000000000ULL)  return 18;
    else if (num < 10000000000000000000ULL) return 19;
    else                                    return 20;
  }
  template <typename R>
  inline unsigned count_long_long(const R num) {return 20;}
}

template <typename R>
inline unsigned count(const R num)
{
  if(num < 10)                    return 1;
  else if (num < 100)             return 2;
  else if (num < 1000)            return 3;
  else if (num < 10000)           return 4;
  else if (num < 100000)          return 5;
  else if (num < 1000000)         return 6;
  else if (num < 10000000)        return 7;
  else if (num < 100000000)       return 8;
  else if (num < 1000000000)      return 9;
  else return count_long_long(num);
}
share|improve this answer
    
What if R is a char or short? –  UncleBens Jan 6 '11 at 23:07
    
@UncleBens: Of course, then you would have to divide the count() functions further using the same scheme. If there are many types to consider, it would make sense to resort to template-meta programming. But it seems there's only 8, 16, 32, and 64bit, so dividing according to this size should be enough. –  sbi Jan 7 '11 at 0:16

Since it's an inline function, why don't you trust the compiler a little and make it

static inline unsigned count(const R unsigned long long);

which should then promote its argument of whatever integer type to unsigned long long (standards pedants pick me up on this, but I assume it would) and run the code as given, which gives the same result as it would in your templated case.

In practice the compiler should (test it if you're bothered) remove the unnecessary conditions if they spot the input to have restricted range, which is in any case what you're hoping for in the templated case. The additional cost over templating is one promotion from <num> to unsigned long long, assuming, again, that your compiler's an idiot.

share|improve this answer

I have an issue with your approach.

Your code is not optimized, because you do a linear search instead of a binary search.

A quick example, say that your number is between 0 and 65535 (inclusive) you should probably use the following algorithm:

if num < 1000:
  if num < 100:
     if num < 10: return 1
     return 2
  return 3

if num < 10000: return 4
return 5

This is a binary search, there is at most 3 comparisons in the worst case (numbers of 1 or 2 digits) and all the others are only 2 comparisons.

This implies that there is information in the size of your integer, that should not be discarded thoughtlessly.

namespace detail
{
  template <int Size> struct number_bits {};

  template <typename Unsigned>
  number_bits< sizeof(Unsigned)*8 > count_number_bits(Unsigned)
  {
    return number_bits< sizeof(Unsigned)*8 >();
  }

  template <typename Unsigned>
  unsigned number_digits_helper(Unsigned t, number_bits<8>);

  template <typename Unsigned>
  unsigned number_digits_helper(Unsigned t, number_bits<16>);

  template <typename Unsigned>
  unsigned number_digits_helper(Unsigned t, number_bits<32>);

  template <typename Unsigned>
  unsigned number_digits_helper(Unsigned t, number_bits<64>);

  template <typename Unsigned>
  unsigned number_digits_helper(Unsigned t, number_bits<128>);

  template <typename Unsigned>
  unsigned number_digits_helper(Unsigned t, number_bits<256>);

} // namespace detail


template <typename Unsigned>
unsigned number_digits(Unsigned t)
{
  static_assert(!std::numeric_limits<Unsigned>::is_signed, "t is signed");
  return detail::number_digits_helper(t, detail::count_number_bits(t));
}

And now, you can fully optimize each of the routines per number of bits of the unsigned type (I know, there is no real reason there would be more than one unsigned type per size, would it ?)

For optimizing when the size is known, I recommend you have a look at Bit Twiddling Hacks which is all about micro optimizations.

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