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I have an interface that has a property of another interface. Is there anyway to export/provide/include the child interface whenever the parent interface is referenced in a using.

//IBar.cs
namespace bar
{
    interface IBar
    {
        public int BarProp { get; set; }
    }
}

//IFoo.cs
namespace foo
{
    using bar
    interface IFoo
    {
        public IBar FooProp { get; set; }
    }
}

//elsewhere.cs
namespace foo
{
    //using bar //without this, 
    IFoo myFoo = new SomeClassThatImplementsIFoo();
    myFoo.FooProp.BarProp //<-- BarProp is inaccessable here
}

In elsewhere.cs, I have a reference to IFoo, but would like to be able to access elements of IBar without having to include references and a using statement to IBar. Is there anyway to set up IFoo so that whenever it gets referenced/included, it also brings IBar along for the ride? Something like the way #includes work in straight C. If you say "Copy and paste IBar into IFoo.cs", I'll ignore you.

I'm guessing that since I've never seen anything that can do this, the answer is probably that you can't do this in C#.

EDIT: The files IBar.cs and IFoo.cs are in separate assemblies
EDIT: The interfaces are public, not the properties

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4 Answers 4

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Your above code should work without any modifications or extra "using" statements added. This is because the C# compiler compiles the whole project (i.e. all of the source files) as one big unit, whereas C (and C++) compilers are instructed by preprocessor directives (like #include) to tell them which files to include.

By the way, members in interface declarations are implicitly public, so your 'public' modifiers there are redundant in the least (I think it also gives you a compiler error). Perhaps that is what's confusing you?

Inaccessibility can only occur (in case of interfaces) when you don't match the visibility modifiers, for example:

internal interface IFoo
{
     void Stuff();
}

public interface ISomething
{
     IFoo GetFoo();
}

In this case you'll get a compiler error of "Inconsistent accessibility".

Edit: if elsewhere.cs and IBar.cs are in different assemblies, the assembly with elsewhere.cs in it must have a reference to the assembly containing IBar (and IFoo). There's no way to automate that, though Visual Studio will warn you if you're missing any references (and your project won't compile).

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namespace bar
{
    interface IBar
    {
        public int BarProp { get; set; }
    }
}

//IFoo.cs
namespace foo
{
    using bar;
    interface IFoo
    {
        public IBar FooProp { get; set; }
    }
}

//elsewhere.cs
namespace foo
{

    class test: IFoo {

        public test (){
    //using bar //without this, 
    IFoo myFoo = new test();
    int val = myFoo.FooProp.BarProp; //<-- **BarProp is not inaccessable here**
        }
    }
}

Types are accessible using namespaces not files.

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Sorry, I meant to indicate that that they were in different assemblies as well as different files. –  Martin Neal Jan 6 '11 at 19:48

This is not a question of “can do” or “can't do” in C#, it's just the way the cookie crumbles and there's nothing wrong about it. Basically, you just have to reference that assembly and put that namespace into using clauses to access IBar.

What in particular makes you any troubles? If your problem is just the editing experience, consider using a tool like ReSharper.

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No what you are asking cannot be done in C#. You simply must add both using statements.

The closest mechanism to what you'd want, and I still don't expect it to work, is a "using alias", which looks like this:

using BarProp = bar.IBar.BarProp; //nice try, but not legal

Wishful thinking, but no.

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