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I tried to check a perfomance with boxing and without. Here is a code:

public struct p1
{
    int x, y;
    public p1(int i)
    {
        x = y = i;
    }

}
public class MainClass
{
    public static void Main()
    {
        var al = new List<object>();
        var l = new List<p1>();
        var sw = new Stopwatch();
        sw.Start();
        for (int i = 0; i < 1000; i++)
        {
            al.Add(new p1(i));
        }
        p1 b;
        for (int i = 0; i < 1000; i++)
        {
            b = (p1)al[i];
        }
        Console.WriteLine(sw.ElapsedTicks);

        var time = sw.ElapsedTicks;

        for (int i = 0; i < 1000; i++)
        {
            l.Add(new p1(i));
        }
        p1 v;
        for (int i = 0; i < 1000; i++)
        {
            v = l[i];
        }
        var t = sw.ElapsedTicks - time;
        Console.WriteLine(t);
        Console.ReadKey();
    }
}

But List of object works faster then List of p1. Why?
1139 9256
1044 6909

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3  
As an aside, please use better variable and class names, even in sample code. When hit with a wall of code and when presented with names like p1, al, l, sw, b, v, & t, it's not always clear what the code is doing. –  Anthony Pegram Jan 6 '11 at 19:17
    
I've just tried your code, and got very different results - the second one is 3-5 times larger number. So the reason for this is probably in your test configuration, as Reed suggested... –  veljkoz Jan 6 '11 at 19:20

2 Answers 2

I suspect this could be caused by quite a few things.

First, you should always put timings like this into a loop, and run them more than once in the same process. The JIT overhead will occur on the first run, and can dominate your timings. This will skew the results. (Normally, you'll want to completely ignore the first run...)

Also, make sure that you're running this in a release build, run outside of the Visual Studio test host. (Don't hit F5 - use Ctrl+F5 or run from outside VS.) Otherwise, the test host will disable most optimizations and dramatically slow down your results.

For example, try the following:

public static void Main()
{
    for (int run = 0; run < 4; ++run)
    {
        if (run != 0)
        {
            // Ignore first run
            Console.WriteLine("Run {0}", run);
        }
        var al = new List<object>();
        var l = new List<p1>();
        var sw = new Stopwatch();
        sw.Start();
        for (int i = 0; i < 1000; i++)
        {
            al.Add(new p1(i));
        }
        p1 b;
        for (int i = 0; i < 1000; i++)
        {
            b = (p1)al[i];
        }
        sw.Stop();
        if (run != 0)
        {
            // Ignore first run
            Console.WriteLine("With boxing: {0}", sw.ElapsedTicks);
        }

        sw.Reset();
        sw.Start();
        for (int i = 0; i < 1000; i++)
        {
            l.Add(new p1(i));
        }
        p1 v;
        for (int i = 0; i < 1000; i++)
        {
            v = l[i];
        }
        sw.Stop();
        if (run != 0)
        {
            // Ignore first run
            Console.WriteLine("Without boxing: {0}", sw.ElapsedTicks);
        }
    }
    Console.ReadKey();
}

On my system, by ignoring the first run (JIT issues), and running outside the VS test host in release, I get:

Run 1
With boxing: 99
Without boxing: 61
Run 2
With boxing: 92
Without boxing: 56
Run 3
With boxing: 97
Without boxing: 54

This is obviously dramatically better with the generic, non-boxed version.

Given the very large numbers in your results - I suspect this test was run in VS in Debug mode...

share|improve this answer
    
Interestingly enough the second loop for me is slower even with your modified code. –  Andrew Finnell Jan 6 '11 at 19:19
    
@Andrew: On every run, or just the first? It's slower for me on the first run, too... but not subsequent ones. (I suspect it's the JIT overhead on List<p1> creation) –  Reed Copsey Jan 6 '11 at 19:21
    
I take that back. My code was different than yours however when i ran mine in a loop the second set was still slower. I am looking through your version and mine to see why these results are occuring. In the version i did the second set was always reporting as slowed even after the first run but with yours the second is reporting faster. Obviously there is some significant change and im looking through it now. –  Andrew Finnell Jan 6 '11 at 19:22
    
ok it was a silly mistake on my part with not resetting the stopwatch. So the JIT does take care of subsequent loops. –  Andrew Finnell Jan 6 '11 at 19:26

Structs are passed by value not reference. When you auto-box it I believe it will then be passed around by reference. So it is copied multiple times in the second loop.

share|improve this answer
    
It's copied multiple times in both loops - however, in the first, every storage requires a boxing operation, and every access requires the value to be unboxed, then copied into the result. The first is definitely slower (see my answer with timings). –  Reed Copsey Jan 6 '11 at 19:20
    
@Reed It could be my misunderstanding of boxing and how List is implemented, but if T is a value type then it is passed by value within Add() for every method it is used. If it is boxed then the boxed reference shouldn't result in a new copy after the initial boxing. If List.Add did List.CheckIfExists(t), List.AddForReal(t), it would result in 3 copies occurring. If it was boxed I don't believe this it would happen this way. –  Andrew Finnell Jan 6 '11 at 19:28
    
When you pass the reference type, the reference is copied (by value) for each method. That being said, the boxing overhead is FAR heavier than the overhead of the copy of the value type. In addition, the JIT will often inline and eliminate the copies of the value type being passed into methods, in some cases... List doesn't do a check for existence, btw, since it allows duplicates - so the only check is a check to see if it needs to grow, then a copy into the internal array. –  Reed Copsey Jan 6 '11 at 19:36

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