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I just wonder if it is possible to send Meeting Requests to people without having Outlook installed on the Server and using COM Interop (which I want to avoid on a server at all costs).

We have Exchange 2003 in a Windows 2003 Domain and all users are domain Users. I guess I can send 'round iCal/vCal or something, but I wonder if there is a proper standard way to send Meeting Requests through Exchange without Outlook?

This is C#/.net if it matters.

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The amount of time you chose to wait makes me think that my suggestion is not exactly what you had in mind. Did you at least get it to work? –  Tomalak Jan 23 '09 at 10:53
    
I just did not have time to test it earlier. A quick test of it seemed to work, and I sent an Outlook Meeting Invitation to an account that has POP3 enabled to get a "raw dump". These two bits are good enough for me to figure the rest out, since I only need to send meetings but not care about reply –  Michael Stum Jan 23 '09 at 13:42
    
In any case, your answer was tremendously helpful, many thanks! –  Michael Stum Jan 23 '09 at 13:43
    
Cheers! :) Good to hear. –  Tomalak Jan 23 '09 at 15:05
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3 Answers 3

up vote 32 down vote accepted

The way to send a meeting request to Outlook (and have it recognized) goes like this:

  • prepare an iCalendar file, be sure to set these additional properties, as Outlook needs them:
  • prepare a multipart/alternative mail:
    • Part 1: text/html (or whatever you like) - this is displayed to "ordinary" mail readers or as a fall-back and contains a summary of the event in human readable form
    • Part 2: text/calendar; method=REQUEST, holds the contents of the ics file (the header method parameter must match the method in the ics). Watch out for the correct text encoding, declaring a charset header parameter won't hurt.
    • Part 3: Optionally, attach the .ics file itself, so ordinary mail readers can offer the user something to click on. Outlook does not really require the attachment because it just reads the text/calendar part.
  • Send the mail to an outlook user. If you got everything right the mail shows up as a meeting request, complete with attendance buttons and automatic entry in the users calendar upon accept.
  • Set up something that processes the responses (they go to the meeting organizer). I have not yet been able to get automatic attendee tracking to work with an Exchange mailbox because the event won't exist in the organizers calendar. Outlook needs the UIDs and SEQUENCES to match it's expectations, but with a UID you made up this will hardly work.

For help on the details and peculiarities of the ics file format, be sure to visit the iCalendar Specification Excerpts by Masahide Kanzaki. They are a light in the dark, much better than gnawing your way through RFC 2445. But then again, maybe a handy library exists for .NET.

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I just did not have time to test it earlier. A quick test of it seemed to work, and I sent an Outlook Meeting Invitation to an account that has POP3 enabled to get a "raw dump". These two bits are good enough for me to figure the rest out, since I only need to send meetings but not care about reply –  Michael Stum Jan 23 '09 at 13:42
1  
Removing the following header from Part 2 did the trick for me: Content-Disposition: attachment; filename=meeting.ics As long as this header was in the mail, Outlook would display the ICS as an attachment. –  Bob Dec 2 '09 at 20:14
    
This is what happens when a Content-Disposition: attachment header is present. ;-) –  Tomalak Dec 3 '09 at 7:42
1  
Thanks, this was really useful - spent a long time wondering why it didn't work but realised I was sending mail as multipart/mixed not mulitpart/alternative. Duh! –  Mat Mannion Mar 14 '11 at 17:02
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The code below will send a meeting request in such a way that Outlook will render Accept/Decline buttons.

Note that UID must be unique per meeting, I've used a GUID.

Also note you need to replace CREATED, DTSTART, DTEND, DTSTAMP, LAST-MODIFIED. These are UTC date/times.

    var m = new MailMessage();

    m.Subject = "Meeting";

    m.Body = "";

    string iCal = 
@"BEGIN:VCALENDAR
PRODID:-//Microsoft Corporation//Outlook 14.0 MIMEDIR//EN
VERSION:2.0
METHOD:PUBLISH
X-MS-OLK-FORCEINSPECTOROPEN:TRUE
BEGIN:VEVENT
CLASS:PUBLIC
CREATED:20140423T045933Z
DESCRIPTION:desc
DTEND:20140430T080000Z
DTSTAMP:20140423T045933Z
DTSTART:20140430T060000Z
LAST-MODIFIED:20140423T045933Z
LOCATION:location...
PRIORITY:5
SEQUENCE:0
SUMMARY;LANGUAGE=en-us:Summary...
TRANSP:OPAQUE
UID:D8BFD357-88A7-455C-86BC-C2CECA9AC5C6
X-MICROSOFT-CDO-BUSYSTATUS:BUSY
X-MICROSOFT-CDO-IMPORTANCE:1
X-MICROSOFT-DISALLOW-COUNTER:FALSE
X-MS-OLK-AUTOFILLLOCATION:FALSE
X-MS-OLK-CONFTYPE:0
BEGIN:VALARM
TRIGGER:-PT60M
ACTION:DISPLAY
DESCRIPTION:Reminder
END:VALARM
END:VEVENT
END:VCALENDAR";

    using (var iCalView = AlternateView.CreateAlternateViewFromString(iCal, new System.Net.Mime.ContentType("text/calendar")))
    {
        m.AlternateViews.Add(iCalView);

        var c = new SmtpClient();

        // Send message
        c.Send(m);
    }

This assumes you have a local SMTP server configured in your config file:

  <system.net>
    <mailSettings>
      <smtp deliveryMethod="Network" from="no-reply@example.com">
        <network defaultCredentials="true" host="smtp.example.local" />
      </smtp>
    </mailSettings>
  </system.net>
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