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This is a poll of sorts about common concurrency problems in Java. An example might be the classic deadlock or race condition or perhaps EDT threading bugs in Swing. I'm interested both in a breadth of possible issues but also in what issues are most common. So, please leave one specific answer of a Java concurrency bug per comment and vote up if you see one you've encountered.

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closed as not constructive by Bill the Lizard Oct 2 '11 at 1:00

As it currently stands, this question is not a good fit for our Q&A format. We expect answers to be supported by facts, references, or expertise, but this question will likely solicit debate, arguments, polling, or extended discussion. If you feel that this question can be improved and possibly reopened, visit the help center for guidance.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

4  
Why is this closed? This is useful both for other programmers begging concurrency in Java, and to have an idea of what classes of concurrency defects are being observed the most by other Java developers. –  L̲̳o̲̳̳n̲̳̳g̲̳̳p̲̳o̲̳̳k̲̳̳e̲̳̳ Mar 31 '13 at 1:56
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49 Answers

Starting Java RMI causes a background task to run that forces the garbage collector to run every 60 seconds. In itself, this may be a good thing, however it may be that the RMI server wasn't started by you directly, but by a framework/tool you use (eg. JRun). And, the RMI might not actually be being used for anything.

The net result is a System.gc() call once a minute. On a heavily loaded system, you will see the following output in your logs - 60 seconds of activity followed by a long gc pause followed by 60 seconds of activity followed by a long gc pause. This is fatal to throughput.

The solution is to turn off explicit gc using -XX:+DisableExplicitGC

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Honesly? Prior to the advent of java.util.concurrent, the most common problem I routinely ran into was what I call "thread-thrashing": Applications that use threads for concurrency, but spawn too many of them and end up thrashing.

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Race conditions during an object's finalize/release/shutdown/destructor method and normal invocations.

From Java, I do a lot of integration with resources that need to be closed, such as COM objects or Flash players. Developers always forget to do this properly and end up having a thread call an object that has been shutdown.

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Failure to provide clearly defined lifecycle methods on objects that manage long-running threads. I like to create pairs of methods named init() and destroy(). It is also important to actually call destroy() so your app can exit gracefully.

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Keeping all threads busy.

This is most frequent with having to go fix problems in other people's code, because they abused the locking constructs. As of late, my coworkers seem to have found reader/writer locks quite fun to sprinkle around whereas a little thought removes their need entirely.

In my own code, keeping the threads busy is less obvious but challenging. It requires deeper thought into algorithms, such as writing new data structures, or carefully designing a system to ensure that when locking is used it will never be contended.

Solving concurrency mistakes is easy - trying to figure out how to avoid lock contention can be hard.

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1) A common mistake that I have encountered involves iterating over a synchronized Collection class. It is required to manually synchronized before getting the iterator and while iterating.

2) Another mistake is that most textbooks give the impression that making a class thread safe is just a matter of adding synchronized on every method. That in itself is not a guarantee - it will only protect the integrity of the particular class, but the results can still be undeterministic.

3) Putting too much time-costly operations in a synchronized block often result in very bad performance. Fortunately the Future pattern in the concurrency package can safe the day.

4) Caching mutable objects to improve performance often leads to multithreading issues as well (and sometimes very hard to track since you assume you are the only user).

5) Using multiple synchronisation objects must be carefully handled.

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Concurrency problem of using different lock objects with wait and notify.

I was trying to use wait() and notifyAll() methods and here is how i used and fell in hell.

Thread1

Object o1 = new Object();

synchronized(o1) {
    o1.wait();
}

And in other thread. Thread - 2

Object o2 = new Object();

synchronized(o2) {
    o2.notifyAll();
}

Thread1 will wait on o1 and Thread2 which should have invoked o1.notifyAll(), is invoking o2.notifyAll(). Thread 1 will never wake up.

And offcourse the common problem of not invoking wait() or notifyAll() within synchronized blocks and not invoking them using the same object that is used to sycnhronze the block.

Object o2 = new Object();

synchronized(o2) {
    notifyAll();
}

This will cause IllegalMonitorStateException, since the thread that invoked notifyAll() has invoked notifyAll() using this object but is not the owner of the this lock object. But the current thread is owner of o2 lock object.

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Try this code..

public class MyServlet implements Servlet{
    private Object something;

    public void service(ServletRequest request, ServletResponse response)
        throws ServletException, IOException{
        this.something = request.getAttribute("something");
        doSomething();
    }

    private void doSomething(){
        this.something ...
    }
}
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Since Java 5 there is Thread.getUncaughtExceptionHandler but this UncaughtExceptionHandler is never called when a ExecutorService/ThreadPool is used.
At least I was not able to get the UncaughtExceptionHandler with an ExcutorService working.

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I ran into a pseudo-deadlock from an I/O thread that created a countdown latch. A vastly simplified version of the problem is like:

public class MyReader implements Runnable {

  private final CountDownLatch done = new CountDownLatch(1);
  private volatile isOkToRun = true;

  public void run() {
    while (isOkToRun) {
       sendMessage(getMessaage());
    }
    done.countDown();
  }

  public void stop() {
    isOkToRun = false;
    done.await();
  }

}

The idea of stop() is that it didn't return until the thread had exited, so when it returned the system was in a known state. This is OK, unless sendMessage() results in the invokation of stop(), where it will wait forever. As long as stop() is never invoked from the Runnable, everything will work as you expect. In a large application, however, the activity of the Runnable's thread may not be obvious!

The solution was to call await() with a timeout of a few seconds, and to log a stack dump and complaint any time the timeout occurred. This preserved the desired behavior when it was possible, and exposed coding problems as they were encountered.

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A method saving data to an instance variable in order to "save effort" passing it to helper methods, when another method which can be called concurrently uses the same instance variables for its own purposes.

The data should instead be passed around as method parameters for the duration of the synchronized call. This is only a slight simplification of my worst memory:

public class UserService {

    private String userName;

    public String getUserName() {
        return userName;
    }

    public void login(String name) {
        this.userName = name; 
        doLogin();
    }

    private void doLogin() {
        userDao.login(getUserName());
    }

    public void delete(String name) {
        this.userName = name; 
        doDelete();
    }

    private void doDelete() {
        userDao.delete(getUserName());
    }

}

The login and logout methods do not have to be synchronized, logically speaking. But written as-is you get to expeience all sorts of fun customer service calls.

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Updating a Swing UI component (typically a progress bar) in a worker thread instead of in the Swing thread (one should of course use SwingUtilities.invokeLater(Runnable), but if you forget to do this then the bug can take a long time to surface.)

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The biggest problem I have run across is developers that add multi-threading support as an afterthought.

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Assisting with the Implementation of Actors in Functional Java and benchmarking millions of threads on multi-core machines.

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My two cents on trying to avoid synchronization problems from the start — watch out for the following issues/smells:

  1. When writing code, always know in which thread you're in.
  2. When designing a class or API for reuse, always ask yourself whether the code has to be thread-safe. It's better to make a deliberate decision, and document that your unit is not thread-safe, than to put in unwise synchronization with potential for deadlock.
  3. Invocations of new Thread() are a smell. Use dedicated ExecutorServices instead, which force you to think about your application's overall threading concept (see 1) and encourage others to follow it.
  4. Know and use library classes (like AtomicBoolean et al, synchronized Collections, etc). Again: make a conscious decision on whether thread-safety is important in a given context, don't just use them blindly.
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public class ThreadA implements Runnable {
    private volatile SharedObject obj;

    public void run() {
        while (true) {
            obj = new SharedObject();
            obj.setValue("Hallo");
        }
    }

    public SharedObject getObj() {
        return obj;
    }
}

The problem I'm trying to point out here (among others) is that the flush of the SharedObject obj happens before setting the value "Hallo". That means that the consumer of getObj() might retrieve an instance where getValue() returns null.

public class ThreadB implements Runnable {
    ThreadA a = null;

    public ThreadB(ThreadA a) {
        this.a = a;
    }

    public void run() {
        while (true) {
            try {
                System.out.println("SharedObject: " + a.getObj().getVal());
                Thread.sleep(50);
            } catch (InterruptedException e) {
                e.printStackTrace();
            }
        }
    }
}

public class SharedObject {
    private String val = null;

    public SharedObject() {
    }

    public String getVal() {
        return val;
    }

    public void setVal(String val) {
        this.val = val;
    }
}
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A nasty gotcha I've found in java is having multiple threads access a HashMap without synchronization. If one is reading and one is writing then there is a good chance of the reader ending up in an infinite loop (the bucket node list structure gets corrupted into a looped list).

Obviously you shouldn't be doing this in the first place (use ConcurrentHashMap or Collections.synch... wrapper), but it seems to be the one that always gets through the net and causes proper thread stuck, system completely broken, usually due to a utility class containing such a map being a few levels down the stack and nobody thinking of it.

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while(true)
{
   if (...)
     break

   doStuff()
}

Invariably when developers write while loops they miss the "resource commit" in their own code.

Namely if that block does not exit, the application and maybe even the system will lock up and die. Just because of a simple while(fantasy_land)...if(...) break.

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1  
This is a problem but I don't see it as a concurrency bug? –  Alex Miller Jan 21 '09 at 13:36
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I think the most frequent concurrency problem in Java is code that actually seems to work so far, although it is not really thread-safe at all. Thanks to a tiny error, it becomes a time bomb and in almost all cases, you don't know that in advance, because it is not obvious to you. While regular faulty code hopefully fails during tests, concurrent code often only fails eventually and non-reproducible.

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