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what i'm writing is simple, well, it should be, but i'm getting this error and i don't know what else to do, my code look like this

int main()
{
    char *option;

    while(strcmp(option,"exit")!=0){

        int opt = GetSystemDefaultUILanguage();
        std::string lang;
        switch(opt)
        {
            case 3082:
                    lang = "number 3082";
                    break;
            case 1033:
                    lang = "number 1033";
                    break;
        }
        std::cout<<lang<<'\n';
        std::cin>>option;
    }

}

when i compile it there isn't errors, but when i run it, i get a this error
Project xxxx raised exception class EAccessViolation with message 'Access violation at address zzzzz'.Process stopped. Use Step or Run to continue.

EDITED:
This is my full code, now is more simple, but still the same result.
even if i try with an if/else statement it wont work, need some help here, thanks

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2  
That code is perfectly fine. On what line does the debugger say the access violation is occurring? Have you tried compiling with optimizations turned off? –  Adam Rosenfield Jan 6 '11 at 19:37
1  
Debugger is your friend. –  Gene Bushuyev Jan 6 '11 at 19:44
    
Access violation at address 00401B0F. Read of address 00000008. this is the full message, i don't see a line number and i don't know what really means, the code look perfect, but i don't know what really happen. –  Kstro21 Jan 6 '11 at 19:45
1  
@Kstro21: So what makes you think that that code is responsible for the access violation? –  Adam Rosenfield Jan 6 '11 at 19:47
3  
@Kstro21: Despite my valiant efforts, my psychic debugging skills are not strong enough to infer the rest of your code base. Since what you've posted is clearly an incomplete program, you therefore have other code besides this, so your error lies somewhere in that other code. –  Adam Rosenfield Jan 6 '11 at 20:01

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Your program will always get an access violation because of the following lines:

char *option;

while(strcmp(option,"exit")!=0){

std::cin>>option;

You never initialize the pointer option, but then try to use it. Change your code to this:

int main()
{
    std::string option;

    while(option != "exit")
    {
        int opt = GetSystemDefaultUILanguage();
        std::string lang;
        switch(opt)
        {
            case 3082:
                    lang = "number 3082";
                    break;
            case 1033:
                    lang = "number 1033";
                    break;
        }
        std::cout<<lang<<std::endl;
        std::cin>>option;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
thanks, i always get a new problem when trying to use pointers and strings with c++. –  Kstro21 Jan 6 '11 at 20:31
    
The issue is using C-style strings, especially for input. Use std::string for input, it is safer. Search the web for "buffer overrun error". –  Thomas Matthews Jan 6 '11 at 20:34
    
@Thomas: In this case it wasn't a problem with the C-style string, but rather using an uninitialized character pointer (or rather, trying to use a C-style string incorrectly). –  Zac Howland Jan 6 '11 at 20:45

I can't tell you the cause of the specific run-time error you're seeing, but I call tell you what's wrong with your program: hardcoded paths to user directories. Localized names are just one of a myriad of things that can go wrong with trying to guess the paths yourself.

DON'T DO THAT. Instead, read environment variables or call Shell APIs to find out where this particular user wants temporary data stored (or documents, pictures, desktop icons, etc).

Have a look at getenv("TEMP") and ShGetSpecialFolderPath

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Your problem is this line:

   std::cin>>option;

The variable option is declared as an uninitialized pointer to a character. Thus in the above statement, you are reading data into an unknown location.

Why do you use C style strings (char *) and C++ std::string? You should get rid of C style strings (unless they are constant). Try this:

#include <iostream>
#include <string>

int main(void)
{
  std::string option;
  do
  {
     std::cout << "Type exit to end program." << std::endl; // endl will flush output buffer
     std::getline(cin, option);  // Input a text line into "option".
  } while (option != "exit");  // C-style string, used as a constant.
  return 0;
}
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You wrote

BlockquoteProject xxxx raised exception class EAccessViolation with message 'Access violation at address zzzzz'.Process stopped. Use Step or Run to continue.

So why don't you pause your program before crash, go to the location and put a breakpoint? If you still can't cope with that than upload your code to a filesharing server and give us the link ;)

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