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Is there a way to find out how much memory my java thread is taking in the VM?

For example, using stack trace dump, or some other means.

Thanks

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You should try out the VisualVM tool. –  Vinay Pai Jan 6 '11 at 20:00
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Sun must be listening - you can use the new interfaces on the platform-specific ThreadMXBean to get per-thread memory usage: download.oracle.com/javase/6/docs/jre/api/management/extension/… –  BeeOnRope Jul 13 '11 at 22:29
    
@BeeOnRope that's awesome answer! You should post it as an answer and I'll vote it up. –  Hendy Irawan May 20 at 16:19
    
@HendyIrawan, in fact it was originally, but it seems like it was deleted by a moderator and converted to a comment. Not sure why... –  BeeOnRope May 27 at 5:54

1 Answer 1

Java threads use the heap as shared memory. Individual threads have their stack (the size of which you can set via the -Xss command line option, default is 512KB), but all other memory (the heap) does not belong to specific threads, and asking how much of it one specific thread uses simply does not make sense.

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But in my system, I have all the threads doing similar kind of functioning. So just to get an approximate picture, I am thinking of getting the size of heap and dividing it by the number of threads to get the approximate size each thread is taking.. would that be a fare assumption? –  Vikas Jain Jan 6 '11 at 21:09
    
@Vikas: it still does not make sense. What do you want to use that number for? –  Michael Borgwardt Jan 6 '11 at 21:19
    
I have to make a system to dynamically increase or decrease the number of threads based on the some external factors. I wanted to analyse the two options I have. 1. Keep starting and removing threads in the system every so much time OR 2. Start with the MAX number of threads and to reduce, I just tell them to wait in a Thread.sleep. .. this 2nd approach is more simple from implementation point of view, but wanted to analyse that how much stack space a waiting thread is taking in the system so that I run out the chances of Out of memory. –  Vikas Jain Jan 6 '11 at 21:27
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Thread stack size: "On x86 Solaris/Linux it is 320k in the 32-bit VM and 1024k in the 64-bit VM. On Windows, [...] this value is 320k in the 32-bit VM and 1024k in the 64-bit VM." source –  Ricket Oct 3 '12 at 17:08
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@Lauri: all heap memory is shared between all threads per definition. –  Michael Borgwardt Dec 20 '13 at 16:50

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