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what i want to do is select the appropriate class to instantiate based on parenthesis passed in. Currently what i have are two classes (ClassA and ClassB) and to call these im using 2 methods depending on the parenthesis. What i would like to achieve is to use just one method to instantiate either ClassA or ClassB based on the string parenthesis passed.

I dont really know how i can pass back the class object to use..

My old way was in Method A to call the class to instantiate then i could use it. ClassA myclass = new ClassA();

I did think about using the following but i do not (if im honest) know how i instantiate the object o or use it when it is passed back by MyMethod. object o doesnt appear to give me access to the public string methods in Class A or Class B.

public class ClassA
{
    public ClassA()
    {
    	//Do something for Class A
    }
    public string msgA()
    {
    	return "Here is msg A";
    }
}

public class ClassB
{
    public ClassB()
    {
    	//Do something for Class B
    }
    public string msgB()
    {
    	return "Here is msg B";
    }
}

private string MyMethod()
{
    object o = GetClassToInstantiate("ClassA");
    //Use object o 
}

private object GetClassToInstantiate(string parameter)
{
    object temp = null;
    switch (parameter)
    {
    	case "ClassA":
    		temp = new ClassA();
    		break;
    }

    return temp;
}

Any suggestions how i can solve this probably very easy situation.

share|improve this question
    
Well, your current code is indeed returning an object based on the string parameter you passed in. It's not clear to me what you want to do that it's not already doing. – Jon Skeet Jan 20 '09 at 16:09
    
what is it that you are trying to do from a business perspective? – mson Jan 20 '09 at 16:15
    
I think the OP is probably at that point in the learning curve where interfaces and generics are not in the arsenal yet. With those and a factory method this problem goes away. Hopefully AdamRalph's answer will get more upvotes as it's spot on. – Neil Hewitt Jan 20 '09 at 16:36
    
Do you mean parenthesis or parameters? – Sam Meldrum Jan 20 '09 at 16:44

What you need is a factory method in a base class:

enum ClassType { ClassA, ClassB }

class ClassBase
{
   public static ClassBase Create(ClassType  classType)
   {
       switch (classType)
       {
           case ClassType.ClassA: return new ClassA();
           case ClassType.ClassB: return new ClassB();
           default: throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException();
       }
   }
}

class ClassA : ClassBase
{
}

class ClassB : ClassBase
{
}

Check the Wikipedia article on the Factory method pattern for more info.

share|improve this answer
    
Awesome, thanks dude.. I knew it would be a simple solution. – user26098 Jan 20 '09 at 16:13
    
Three cheers for Factory methods again!! – Kev Jan 20 '09 at 16:18

What you want to do isn't generally considered a very useful operation. When you're done all you know about the result is that it's an object. You don't know about any methods or properties it provides. Since C# doesn't (currently-coming soon in v4) allow late binding you can't really do anything with the result.

It becomes much more interesting when class A and class B implement a common interface or are inherited from a common base class. In that case, you could have a generic method that instantiates your real class but returns it as the common interface. This is much more useful, for example with plugin archtitectures.

share|improve this answer
    
4.0 won't provide late binding. There's a subtle difference between late binding and dynamic typing. Late binding binds to a type at runtime. Dynamic typing does not bind at all. This will allow you to modify the type at runtime, which late binding would not. – Michael Meadows Jan 20 '09 at 16:28
    
Ok granted, but it will allow you take an object and attempt to call arbitrary methods on it, like the OP was trying to do. – Joel Coehoorn Jan 20 '09 at 16:34
    
Yeah, I wasn't trying to disprove your point, but I preach that late binding has nothing beneficial to offer; you still get type mismatches. Late binding only delays these until the user discovers it, instead of during compilation. Dynamic typing allows you to create missing members at runtime! – Michael Meadows Jan 21 '09 at 16:18

I would use a common interface for your classes and a seperate factory class with a generic factory method as follows:-

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        IAnimal animal = AnimalFactory.CreateAnimal<Dog>();

        animal.Speak();

        Console.ReadKey();
    }
}

public abstract class AnimalFactory
{
    public static IAnimal CreateAnimal<T>() where T : IAnimal, new()
    {
        return new T();
    }
}

public interface IAnimal
{
    void Speak();
}

public class Dog : IAnimal
{
    public void Speak()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Woof");
    }
}

public class Cat : IAnimal
{
    public void Speak()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Meow");
    }
}
share|improve this answer

You would be better off using a design pattern to do this. Take a look at the Abstract Factory and Factory Method patterns on the Gang of Four website.

Abstract Factory

Factory Method

share|improve this answer

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