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In the query below, I want to return people that meet multiple conditions. Some of the conditions apply to fields in the table containing the people to be returned. The other condition is applied to a different table (EmailAddresses) linked to the main table (People) via PersonId.

var t = People.Where(x =>
            x.Type == 102 &&
            x.FirstName == "Bob" &&
            x.LastName == "Williams" &&
                 x.EmailAddresses.Where (ea=> ea.EmailAddress
                                                 == "bob.williams@acme.org")
            )
            .Select(x => x.PersonId)

How do I do this?

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up vote 2 down vote accepted

Do understand this right, at least one of them should have that adress? If yes, use the Any method:

var t = People.Where(x =>
            x.Type == 102 &&
            x.FirstName == "Bob" &&
            x.LastName == "Williams" &&
                 x.EmailAddresses.Any(ea=> ea.EmailAddress
                                                 == "bob.williams@acme.org")
            )
            .Select(x => x.PersonId)

Any returns true if at least one of the elements of the IQueryable<T> fulfills the predicate.

share|improve this answer
    
Correct. The person I want returned must match all four conditions. – DenaliHardtail Jan 6 '11 at 21:06
    
Yup, that's what I got. The question was - what has to be matched in the EmailAdresses property? Just one email adress, right? if yes, this will work. – Femaref Jan 6 '11 at 21:20
    
sorry, yes there should be just one email address – DenaliHardtail Jan 6 '11 at 21:27
    
@Femaref techincally your not calling methods on a IEnumerable<T> but IQueryable<T> when using EF. Difference is that your Any-delegate wont actually execute but only generate an Expression tree when calling on IQuerable – Pauli Østerø Jan 6 '11 at 21:48
    
yes, of course. But an IQueryable is a IEnumerable as well ;) – Femaref Jan 6 '11 at 22:01

I think you could do it with a join, something like this...

var t = from p in People
        join e in EmailAddress on p.PersonId equals e.PersonId into pe
        from a in pe.DefaultIfEmpty
        where p.Type == 102 &&
           p.FirstName == "Bob" &&
           p.LastName == "Williams" &&
           a.EmailAddress == "bob.williams@acme.org"
        select p.PersonId
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