Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a C# 2.0 application where a base interface allows read-only access to a value in a concrete class. But, within the concrete class, I'd like to have read/write access to that value. So, I have an implementation like this:

public abstract class Base
{
    public abstract DateTime StartTime { get; }
}

public class Foo : Base
{
    DateTime start_time_;

    public override DateTime StartTime
    {
        get { return start_time_; }
        internal set { start_time_ = value; }
    }
}

But, this gives me the error:

Foo.cs(200,22): error CS0546: 'Foo.StartTime.set': cannot override because 'Base.StartTime' does not have an overridable set accessor

I don't want the base class to have write access. But, I do want the concrete class to provide read/write access. Is there a way to make this work?

Thanks, PaulH


Unfortunately, Base can't be changed to an interface as it contains non-abstract functionality also. Something I should have thought to put in the original problem description.

public abstract class Base
{
    public abstract DateTime StartTime { get; }

    public void Buzz()
    {
        // do something interesting...
    }
}

My solution is to do this:

public class Foo : Base
{
    DateTime start_time_;

    public override DateTime StartTime
    {
        get { return start_time_; }
    }

    internal void SetStartTime
    {
        start_time_ = value;
    }
}

It's not as nice as I'd like, but it works.

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 0 down vote accepted

My solution is to do this:

public class Foo : Base { DateTime start_time_;

public override DateTime StartTime
{
    get { return start_time_; }
}

internal void SetStartTime
{
    start_time_ = value;
}

}

It's not as nice as I'd like, but it works.

share|improve this answer

You can do it this way:

public abstract class Base
{
    public abstract DateTime StartTime { get; internal set; }
}
public class Foo : Base
{
    DateTime start_time_;
    public override DateTime StartTime
    {
        get
        { 
            return start_time_; 
        }
        internal set
        {
            start_time_ = value;
        }
    }
} 

Optionally, use an interface.

share|improve this answer

You can't do this when deriving from a base class, but you can do it when implementing an interface.

So if you can replace your base class with an interface instead then it will work.

share|improve this answer

Any reason to not use an interface over the abstract class?

    public interface Base
    {
        DateTime StartTime { get; }
    }

    public class Foo : Base
    {
        DateTime start_time_;

        public DateTime StartTime
        {
            get { return start_time_; }
            internal set { start_time_ = value; }
        }
    }
share|improve this answer
    
+1 Faster than me :-) –  Rune Grimstad Jan 6 '11 at 21:12
1  
Because an interface is not a substitute for an abstract base class :/ –  Hans Passant Jan 6 '11 at 21:25

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.