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There are three options that I see for handling dates in Java, but I may be missing some better alternatives yet.

  1. java.util.Date - Which is fine, but is a very simple class with many design flaws
  2. java.util.Calendar - Which is a bit better, but is still really clumbsy to work with
  3. JODA Time - Which is better to work with, but I'm not sure how well it will persist using JPA2

I would like to use JODA Time because it promises an easier API, but persistence is more important so I'd be fine dealing with Calendar or Date if JODA Time does not persist well.

Ultimately, I need something that persists to a database as a date, preferably with an easy to use API.

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3 Answers 3

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java.util.Calendar persists fine with JPA2 as well as java.util.Date, just make sure that you add the @Temporal annotation to the property. Persisting JODA times is better supported in Hibernate, however I don't think it supports temporal querying optimizations included in some relational databases so if you plan on querying by the date sticking with java.util objects will be your best bet. If you don't plan on querying on that column any serializable object can be persisted with JPA.

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I don't think it is "fine" - a @Temporal(TIMESTAMP) java.util.Date will come back as a java.sql.Timestamp which has greater precision. This means that if in your domain the timestamp is part of business key equality, equals will be wonky. Creating a new entity, then fetching it back using its PK, newEntity.equals(resultEntity) will be false sometimes because the time flutters by a milisecond. Poo. –  Doug Moscrop Aug 5 '11 at 21:09

We're having hibernate use JODA's LocalDate directly. Of course there's some configuration and whatnot to do. You can look at this project: Joda-Time Hibernate

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See also newer user Type project - usertype.sourceforge.net –  JodaStephen Jan 15 '11 at 9:07

Use java.util.Date for the persisted POJO property, then convert it to Joda Time as an accessor as necessary.

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