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I have a code for new thread in a button new thread is created whenever i hit that button.I want some way so that i can have something on form that contains the progress of all the threads that are created something like list box containing label that show percent done

var t = new Thread(() =>
        {
            for(int i=0;i<1000;i++)
            {
                 x++;
             }
        });
        t.SetApartmentState(ApartmentState.STA);
        t.Name = projectName;
        t.Start();

Sorry if it sounds silly

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2  
What architecture are you using? WPF? WinForms? –  as-cii Jan 6 '11 at 21:12

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

First of all consider using a Task-based approach (only if you're working with .NET 3.5 or above).

Anyway, when you create a new thread you could add a new label into a ListBox and update its content as the progress of the work goes on.
For example:

void ButtonClick(object sender, RoutedEvent e)
{
   Label label = new Label();
   listBox1.Items.Add(label);       

   Task.Factory.StartNew(() =>
   {
       for (int i = 0; i < 100; i++)
       {
          label.Content = (i + 1).ToString() + "%";
       }
   });
}

Obviously fix cross-thread calls (with Dispatcher.Invoke/Dispatcher.BeginInvoke in WPF, or with label.Invoke in WinForms).

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This isn't going to work, because only the UI thread can update the UI control. That's why I suggested passing in an index into an array, since a background thread can safely update the array element and the UI can safely read and display it on a fixed interval. –  Steven Sudit Jan 6 '11 at 21:25
    
Yes but if, for example, in WPF you use Dispatcher.Invoke you can safely update the UI. –  as-cii Jan 6 '11 at 21:26
    
Right, and there is a similar, if a bit more difficult, technique for WinForms. Nonetheless, the code you showed (which initially lacked the caveat) is broken. I would suggest that, even if you have a safe way to update the UI, you might still want to avoid doing so; the technique I suggested works quite well. –  Steven Sudit Jan 6 '11 at 21:31
    
Why do you say it's broken? –  as-cii Jan 6 '11 at 21:36
    
and have you noticed one more problem ? that is what ever i do in the thread body it will be repeated when button is pressed if i declare a label next time same name label would be updated –  Afnan Bashir Jan 6 '11 at 22:00

If you keep count of how many threads you launched, and start each off with an index, then the thread could update a progress value at that index.

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but i have to show as many labels as the threads that is tricky part –  Afnan Bashir Jan 6 '11 at 21:58
    
So add a new row when you launch the thread. –  Steven Sudit Jan 6 '11 at 22:00
    
can you code some example? –  Afnan Bashir Jan 6 '11 at 22:33
    
I'd really rather not. All I'm saying is that you keep a count of tasks, and an array with one counter per task. To launch a task, you add a control or enable it, then you launch the task with the current count and increment it. The task then uses that as an index into the array, incrementing the element as it wishes. The UI then polls that array and uses it to update corresponding controls. I believe this summary is sufficient to allow you to implement the solution. –  Steven Sudit Jan 7 '11 at 18:24

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