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Would using the wildcard regular expression in a REGEXP_LIKE be less performant than not including the condition clause at all.

For example, I want to create an Oracle prepared statement like the one below:

select * from table_name 
where regexp_like(column1, ?)
and regexp_like(column2, ?)
and regexp_like(column3, ?)
and regexp_like(column4, ?)

The query may not need to specify a criteria for all the columns. For those columns with no criteria, we can use the wildcard regular expression * OR we can simply not include the condition from the where clause.

select * from table_name 
where regexp_like(column1, 'h[i|ello]')
and regexp_like(column2, '.*')
and regexp_like(column3, '.*')
and regexp_like(column4, 'bye')

OR

select * from table_name 
where regexp_like(column1, 'h[i|ello]')
and regexp_like(column4, 'bye')

Would using the wildcard character in the regexp_like condition be less performant than simply not including the condition at all? If so, would it be a significant performance difference?

The underlying concern is that a single sql statement can be used instead of having to dynamically create a sql statement according to the specified criteria.

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up vote 1 down vote accepted

I guess that the optimizer chooses to do a full table scan as soon as it sees a where .. regexp_like, and so, I would assume that any performance impacts are negligible, regardless of how howmany regexp_like you have in your where condition.

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