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C# difference between == and .Equals()

In my daily code routine I use them a lot, but really don't know how exactly they are different from each other.

if(String.Equals(str1, str2))

and

if(str1 == str2)
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marked as duplicate by ChrisF, Austin Salonen, Gordon Gustafson, Woot4Moo, Paul Sasik Jan 6 '11 at 23:04

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

5  
Please don't close. This is not a duplicate of difference between == and object.Equals -- although that is a good link. Both string.Equals(a,b) and string.== are not polymorphic, which is the big difference between == and object.Equals. –  user166390 Jan 6 '11 at 22:48
    
voting to close, these two questions can clearly be merged. –  Woot4Moo Jan 6 '11 at 22:50
    
@Woot4Moo I disagree. This is a specific question about two specific ways of doing a string comparison. The "duplicate question" talks about ==/object.Equals in general. Perhaps string.Equals could also be mentioned, but this would be lost in a merge. –  user166390 Jan 6 '11 at 22:52
1  
@Woot4Moo Please read my last comment. BlueMonk and Merhdad are talking about the non-static string.Equals method. This question is about the static string.Equals method. –  user166390 Jan 6 '11 at 22:58
1  
@Woot4Moo Please note the question contains String.Equals(str1, str2) (perhaps better as string.Equals(str1, str2)) and not str1.Equals(str2). –  user166390 Jan 6 '11 at 23:00

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

(UPDATE)

They are in fact exactly the same.

public static bool operator ==(string a, string b)
{
    return Equals(a, b);
}

so == calls the Equals.


public static bool Equals(string a, string b)
{
    return ((a == b) || (((a != null) && (b != null)) && EqualsHelper(a, b)));
}

EqualsHelper is an unsafe method:

UPDATE What it does, it loops through the characters using integer pointers and compares them as integers (4byte at a time). It does it 10 at a time and then one at a time.

private static unsafe bool EqualsHelper(string strA, string strB)
{
    int length = strA.Length;
    if (length != strB.Length)
    {
        return false;
    }
    fixed (char* chRef = &strA.m_firstChar)
    {
        fixed (char* chRef2 = &strB.m_firstChar)
        {
            char* chPtr = chRef;
            char* chPtr2 = chRef2;
            while (length >= 10)
            {
                if ((((*(((int*) chPtr)) != *(((int*) chPtr2))) || (*(((int*) (chPtr + 2))) != *(((int*) (chPtr2 + 2))))) || ((*(((int*) (chPtr + 4))) != *(((int*) (chPtr2 + 4)))) || (*(((int*) (chPtr + 6))) != *(((int*) (chPtr2 + 6)))))) || (*(((int*) (chPtr + 8))) != *(((int*) (chPtr2 + 8)))))
                {
                    break;
                }
                chPtr += 10;
                chPtr2 += 10;
                length -= 10;
            }
            while (length > 0)
            {
                if (*(((int*) chPtr)) != *(((int*) chPtr2)))
                {
                    break;
                }
                chPtr += 2;
                chPtr2 += 2;
                length -= 2;
            }
            return (length <= 0);
        }
    }
}
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1  
So what exactly does the bit extra do? At first glance it looks like a bitwise comparison. But wouldn't == return true in that case anyways? Is it something locale related? –  CodesInChaos Jan 6 '11 at 22:48
    
so is there any cases where str1 == str2 wont equals String.Equals(str1,srt2)? –  Rami Shareef Jan 6 '11 at 22:51
1  
The update doesn't really explain when == and EqualsHelper give different results. –  CodesInChaos Jan 6 '11 at 22:55
1  
They are exactly the same. Please see my latest update. –  Aliostad Jan 6 '11 at 22:56
1  
So it's a reflector bug that decodes it as a==b instead of (object)a==(object)b? In the form reflector decompiles it it looks like infinite recursion to me. –  CodesInChaos Jan 6 '11 at 22:59

They are absolutely the same. Here is what ildasm shows for ==

  IL_0002:  call       bool System.String::Equals(string,
                                              string)

Also read the documentation: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.string.op_equality.aspx It says

This operator is implemented using the Equals method

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What is ildasm? –  Rami Shareef Jan 6 '11 at 23:04
1  
intermediate language disassembler - a disassembler for .net byte-code –  CodesInChaos Jan 6 '11 at 23:07
2  
ildasm is the tool that shows the IL code for a .NET assembly. It is part of the SDK and its location depends on the actual version of the framework. For example C:\Program Files (x86)\Microsoft SDKs\Windows\v7.0A\Bin –  Stilgar Jan 6 '11 at 23:08

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