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I have an abstract class A, where I have derived the classes B and C. Class A provides an abstract method DoJOB(), which is implemented by both derived classes.

There is a class X which has methods inside, which need to call DoJOB(). The class X may not contain any code like B.DoJOB() or C.DoJOB().

Example:

public class X
{
private A foo;

public X(A concrete)
{
foo = concrete;
}

public FunnyMethod()
{
foo.DoJOB();
}

}

While instantiating class X I want to decide which derived class (B or C) must be used. I thought about passing an instance of B or C using the constructor of X.

X kewl = new X(new C());
kewl.FunnyMethod(); //calls C.DoJOB()

kewl = new X(new B());
kewl.FunnyMethod(); // calls B.DoJOB()

My test showed that declaring a method with a parameter A is not working. Am I missing something? How can I implement this correctly?

(A is abstract, it cannot be instantiated)

EDIT: Sorry, I forgot sth.

class A is a generic abstract singleton:

abstract public class A<T> where T : A<T>
{
    ....
}

public sealed class B : A<B>
{
    .....
}

public sealed class C : A<C>
{
    .....
}

See the example: http://www.c-sharpcorner.com/UploadFile/snorrebaard/GenericSingleton11172008110419AM/GenericSingleton.aspx

Under the head line "The solution with the Generic Singleton as an abstract class"

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What error do you get out of this? A compilation error? Seems fine to me... –  Marnix Jan 6 '11 at 22:52
    
You'll need to be more specific as to what you mean by "not working". –  Anon. Jan 6 '11 at 22:52
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4 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

For your edit:

void Main()
{
var kewl = new X<C>(new C());
kewl.FunnyMethod(); //calls C.DoJOB()

var kewl2 = new X<B>(new B());
kewl2.FunnyMethod(); // calls B.DoJOB()

}

public class X <T> where T : A<T>
{
    private A<T> foo;

    public X(A<T> concrete)
    {
        foo = concrete;
    }

    public void FunnyMethod()
    {
        foo.DoJOB();
    }
}

public abstract class A<T> where T : A<T>
{
    public abstract void DoJOB();
}

public class B : A<B>
{
    public override void DoJOB()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("B");
    }
}

public class C : A<C>
{
    public override void DoJOB()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("C");
    }
}
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Thanks for the answer. Helped me a lot. –  Ferhat Jan 8 '11 at 1:54
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You must have made a mistake in the test, the code works fine:

void Main()
{
X kewl = new X(new C());
kewl.FunnyMethod(); //calls C.DoJOB()

kewl = new X(new B());
kewl.FunnyMethod(); // calls B.DoJOB()

}

public class X
{
    private A foo;

    public X(A concrete)
    {
        foo = concrete;
    }

    public void FunnyMethod()
    {
        foo.DoJOB();
    }
}

public abstract class A
{
    public abstract void DoJOB();
}

public class B : A
{
    public override void DoJOB()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("B");
    }
}

public class C : A
{
    public override void DoJOB()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("C");
    }
}

Outputs :
C
B

share|improve this answer
    
Edited my question. Forgot to say that A is a generic abstract singleton class. See the example using the link. –  Ferhat Jan 6 '11 at 23:11
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Works for me. I get the expected

I did something interesting!
So Did I!

when I run it.

Paste this in your Visual Studio and smoke it

using System;

namespace TestDrive
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main( string[] args )
        {
            ServiceConsumer x = new ServiceConsumer( new ConcreteService2() ) ;

            x.FunnyMethod() ;

            return ;
        }

    }

    abstract class AbstractService
    {
        public abstract void DoSomethingInteresting() ;
    }

    class ConcreteService1 : AbstractService
    {
        public override void DoSomethingInteresting()
        {
            Console.WriteLine("I did something interesting!");
            return ;
        }
    }

    class ConcreteService2 : ConcreteService1
    {
        public override void DoSomethingInteresting()
        {
            base.DoSomethingInteresting() ;
            Console.WriteLine("So Did I!");
            return ;
        }
    }

    class ConcreteService : AbstractService
    {
        public override void DoSomethingInteresting()
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Not It's my turn to do something interesting!") ;
            return ;
        }
    }

    class ServiceConsumer
    {
        private AbstractService Service ;
        public ServiceConsumer( AbstractService serviceInstance )
        {
            this.Service = serviceInstance ;
            return ;
        }
        public void FunnyMethod()
        {
            Service.DoSomethingInteresting() ;
            return ;
        }
    }
}

Cheers!

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I'm not sure I understand the question, here is my implementation and it works:

namespace CSharpConsole {

public abstract class A {
    public abstract void Test();
}
public class B : A {
    public override void Test() {
        System.Console.WriteLine("B:Test called!");
    }
}
public class C : A {
    public override void Test() {
        System.Console.WriteLine("C:Test called!");
    }
}    
class Program {
    private A _concrete;
    public Program(A concrete) {
        _concrete = concrete;
    }
    public void DoTest() {
        _concrete.Test();
    }
    static void Main(string[] args) {
        Program pb = new Program(new B());
        pb.DoTest();
        Program pc = new Program(new C());
        pc.DoTest();
    }
}

}

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