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class AClass
{
    // ...
}

~

class AnotherClass
{
    public:
        // ...
        void AMethod()
        {
            // ...
            AClass * ac = new AClass(); // Dynamic memory allocation here
            m_Objects.push_back(ac);
            // ...
        }
        // ...
    private:
        // ...
        std::vector<AClass *> m_Objects;
        // ...
}

I want to add new objects of AClass to the vector m_Objects.
Is there any other way of doing this without doing dynamic memory allocation?

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3  
Why not store AClass objects in the vector instead of pointers to AClass objects? (Yes, there is still dynamic allocation for the underlying storage of the vector, but not for the individual elements.) –  James McNellis Jan 6 '11 at 23:07
1  
Is there a reason why you don't want to do dynamic memory allocation? –  Sanjit Saluja Jan 6 '11 at 23:16
1  
@Sanjit: Because it is not something desirable very much. It may cause memory leakage. –  hkBattousai Jan 8 '11 at 10:04
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4 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

There are two things causing dynamic memory allocations here:

  1. vector::push_back
  2. new AClass()

Here is one idea how to reduce dynamic memory allocations.

First step is to call m_Objects.reserve(N); in the AnotherClass constructor, where N is the maximum number of AClass objects you want to keep at any given time. This reserves enough memory to remove the need for dynamic allocations by vector::push_back.

Second step is to make m_Objects contain objects instead of pointers, i.e. make it type std::vector<AClass> instead of std::vector<AClass*>. This allows you to skip new and directly create the new object by growing the container:

m_Objects.resize(m_Objects.size() + 1);

Now, there will be no dynamic allocation when adding a new object.

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If you mean "can I create new objects at runtime without doing dynamic allocation?" then the answer is no. That's what dynamic allocation is.

If you want to create some before they're immediately needed by creating them in bulk ahead of time, then that's plausible. Simply allocate a large number and then pull them out of an array or vector as needed.

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@Keith Irwin: I want to create at run-time. –  hkBattousai Jan 6 '11 at 23:07
    
@hkBattousai: That's the definition of dynamic allocation. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 7 '11 at 0:00
1  
@Tomalak: Dynamic allocation usually means allocating memory from the heap. Memory allocation and object instantiation are two separate things (even if they usually go together). Just look up placement new. –  kotlinski Jan 7 '11 at 0:21
1  
@kotlinski: You're right about that. I was simplifying. As for "the heap", no. Heap and stack are outmoded, confusing and inaccurate terms for storage duration. C++ does not specify where these objects must be stored, and nowadays it's not necessarily the case that either is "the stack" or "the heap". Be accurate: objects with automatic storage duration are automatically destroyed when the block in which they are created exits; objects with dynamic storage duration are created with a new-expression, and their lifetime lasts until they are destroyed using a delete-expression. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 7 '11 at 1:31
1  
@Tomalak: "The heap" means a large pool of memory it is possible to allocate from. "The stack" means the thread stack. How exactly is it inaccurate? –  kotlinski Jan 7 '11 at 2:05
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Not so long as m_Objects is a vector of pointers, unless you were to store a pointer to an automatic (stack) variable. But that, undoubtedly, would be a very bad idea.

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There are only two ways to allocate objects at runtime: dynamically on the heap, and on the call stack.

It is possible to instantiate multiple objects that are local (auto) variables within a function block by calling the function recursively, and adding these stack objects to your vector. But I'm pretty sure that's not what you really want.

That means that the only other way is to use new to dynamically create the new objects.

share|improve this answer
1  
Heap and stack are outmoded, confusing and inaccurate terms for storage duration. C++ does not specify where these objects must be stored, and nowadays it's not necessarily the case that either is "the stack" or "the heap". Be accurate: objects with automatic storage duration are automatically destroyed when the block in which they are created exits; objects with dynamic storage duration are created with a new-expression. Their lifetime lasts until they are destroyed using a delete-expression. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 7 '11 at 0:01
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