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I have this program in c++.

ref2.h :

#ifndef REF2_H
#define REF2_H
#include <iostream>
using std::cout;
using std::endl;

int   add_int_int(int a, int b) {return (a+b);}

class IntClass;

class Number {
    public:

        //return a Number object that's the results of x+this, when x is IntClass
        virtual Number& addInt(IntClass& x) = 0;

        //Print the number stored in the object
        virtual void print_number() = 0;
    }

class IntClass : public Number {

    private:
        int my_number;

    public:
        //Constructor
        IntClass(int n):my_number(n) {}

        //returns the number stored in the object
        int get_number()  {return my_number;}

        //print the number stored in the object
        void print_number() {cout << my_number << endl;}

        Number& addInt(IntClass& x);
    }

Number& IntClass::addInt(IntClass& x)
{
    int n = add_int_int(my_number, x.get_number());
    IntClass elem = IntClass(n);
    IntClass &ref = elem;
    return ref;     
}

#endif

test.cpp

#include "ref2.h"
#include <iostream>
using std::cout;
using std::endl;


int main() {    
    cout << "Testing subtyping polymorphism:" << endl;
    IntClass ia(1);
    IntClass ib(2);
    Number& num = ia.addInt(ib);     num.print_number();  //should be: 3
}

I don't find my mistake. If any one can help me ?

share|improve this question
    
Lesson for today: enable your warnings! :) –  Kos Jan 6 '11 at 23:25
2  
What mistakes?? –  Falmarri Jan 6 '11 at 23:26
1  
You should post your compiler errors or the program output and expected output if you think there is something wrong, not just the code. –  mgiuca Jan 6 '11 at 23:32
    
@Fal @mgi Comment on last line in main. –  GManNickG Jan 6 '11 at 23:39
    
@GMan: Yeah, I see the expected output. But that's only a small part of a good question. –  Ben Voigt Jan 7 '11 at 1:33

3 Answers 3

You're returning a reference to a local variable in addInt(). Don't do that. The compiler should've warned you about it.

share|improve this answer
1  
+1 for exact phrasing of "Don't do that." –  Ben Voigt Jan 6 '11 at 23:25
    
I think he introduced the local reference to defeat the (correct) compiler warning. –  Ben Voigt Jan 6 '11 at 23:25
    
@Ben: It sure looks like it. And it bit him in the ass too! ;) –  Macke Jan 7 '11 at 1:31

You're returning a reference to a local object that goes out of scope when addInt() returns:

IntClass elem = IntClass(n);
IntClass &ref = elem;
return ref;    
share|improve this answer

The concept of returning a reference to a Number is (in this case) flawed. Think of a reference like a pointer. The function IntClass::addInt is allocating a new IntClass object on the stack, then returning a reference to it.

When the function returns, the memory for the IntClass is freed, so the reference points to garbage.

You should be returning a pointer to a Number (Number*), and you will need to use new IntClass to create one. Then you will also need to call delete on it when you finish using it.

share|improve this answer

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