Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Hey guys. I've recently run into a problem I'd greatly appreciate any insight into. I posted a similar question prior to Christmas over at PerlMonks with some feedback to switch away from MooseX::Declare ([http://www.perlmonks.org/?node_id=877703][1]). I have now switched the code over to vanilla Moose with MooseX::Types and MooseX::Params::Validate. However, the same error is occurring in the same spot. Not surprising since it appears to be MooseX::Types related.

I am getting the following error (tried to space this out for readability and bottom of stack truncated):


plxc16479> tmp10.pl

Argument cannot be 'name' at /nfs/pdx/disks/nehalem.pde.077/perl/lib64/site_perl/MooseX/Types/TypeDecorator.pm line 88

MooseX::Types::TypeDecorator::new('MooseX::Types::TypeDecorator=HASH(0x1620c58)', 'name', 'g1145114N5582201_16161616a2x_FU02xxT_2bxc2e3_6x0xxxp0fx0xxx0x...', 'mask_data', '', 'tags', 0) called at /nfs/pdx/disks/nehalem.pde.077/projects/lib/Program-Plist-Pl/lib/Program/Plist/Pl.pm line 61

Program::Plist::Pl::_create_pattern_obj(undef, 'name', 'g1145114N5582201_16161616a2x_FU02xxT_2bxc2e3_6x0xxxp0fx0xxx0x...', 'mask_data', '', 'tag_data', '') called at /nfs/pdx/disks/nehalem.pde.077/projects/lib/Program-Plist-Pl/lib/Program/Plist/Pl.pm line 77

Program::Plist::Pl::BUILD('Program::Plist::Pl=HASH(0x162d6c0)', 'HASH(0x162d648)') called at generated method (unknown origin) line 101

Program::Plist::Pl::new('Program::Plist::Pl', 'name', 'bist_hfmmin_16161616_list', 'parents', 'HASH(0xccf040)', 'fh', 'GLOB(0xccc928)', 'external_pl_code', 'CODE(0x14910b0)', ...) called at /nfs/pdx/disks/nehalem.pde.077/projects/lib/Program-Roles-PlHandler/lib/Program/Roles/PlHandler.pm line 52

Program::Roles::PlHandler::_create_global_pl_obj(undef, 'name', 'bist_hfmmin_16161616_list', 'parents', 'HASH(0xccf040)', 'fh', 'GLOB(0xccc928)') called at /nfs/pdx/disks/nehalem.pde.077/projects/lib/Program-Plist-Pl/lib/Program/Plist/Pl.pm line 77

Program::Plist::Pl::BUILD('Program::Plist::Pl=HASH(0xccd300)', 'HASH(0xccc628)') called at generated method (unknown origin) line 101

Program::Plist::Pl::new('Program::Plist::Pl', 'name', 'bist_list', 'parents', 'HASH(0xccce80)', 'fh', 'GLOB(0xccc928)', 'external_pl_code', 'CODE(0x14910b0)', ...) called at /nfs/pdx/disks/nehalem.pde.077/projects/lib/Program-Roles-PlHandler/lib/Program/Roles/PlHandler.pm line 52

The problem i seems to be the top call to TypeDecorator::new. The TypeDecorator constructor seems to expect two arguments, the class/self argument and a reference to a TypeDecorator or TypeConstraint object. Instead, it's somehow receiving the arguments from my create pattern object call. I have verified that the arguments coming into the _create_pattern_obj function are correct and that the arguments going into the Pattern->new call are also correct (borne out by the stack traced arguments). The _create_pattern_obj function looks like this:

sub _create_pattern_obj {
    my ($self, $name, $mask_data, $tag_data) = validated_list(\@_,
                                                              name => {isa => Str},
                                                              mask_data => {isa => Str, optional => 1},
                                                              tag_data => {isa => Str, optional => 1});

    $mask_data = '' if !defined $mask_data;

    my $tags = defined $tag_data ? map {$_ => 1} split(',', $tag_data) : {};

    my $pattern_obj = Program::Plist::Pl::Pattern->new(name => $name,
                                                       mask_data => $mask_data,
                                                       tags => $tags);
    $self->_add_pattern($pattern_obj);
}

The function is dieing on the Program::Plist::Pl::Pattern->new call, which is the line 61 in file Pl.pm file referenced in the above call stack where the TypeDecorator::new call is claiming to come from.

The Pattern class is:

package Program::Plist::Pl::Pattern;

use 5.012002;
our $VERSION = sprintf "2.%03d", q($Revision: 473 $) =~ /: (\d+)/;

use Moose;
use namespace::autoclean;

use MooseX::Types::Moose qw(Str Num Int HashRef);
use MooseX::Params::Validate;

has 'name' => (isa => Str,
               is => 'ro',
               required => 1);

has 'tuple' => (isa => Int,
                is => 'ro');

has 'tid' => (isa => Int,
              is => 'ro');

has 'weight' => (isa => Num,
                 is => 'ro');

has 'tags' => (isa => HashRef[Str],
               is => 'ro',
               default => sub {{}});

has 'mask_data' => (isa => Str,
                    is => 'rw',
                    default => '',
                    writer => '_set_mask_data');

sub has_tag {
    my ($self, $tag) = (shift,
                        pos_validated_list(\@_, {isa => Str}));

    exists $self->{tags}->{$tag} ? return 1 : return 0;
}

sub _add_tag {
    my ($self, $tag) = (shift,
                        pos_validated_list(\@_, {isa => Str}));
    $self->{tags}->{$tag} = 1;
}

sub BUILDARGS {
    print STDERR 'CALLED '.__PACKAGE__."BUILDARGS\n";
    print STDERR 'ARGUMENTS:'.join(',', @_)."\n";
}

sub BUILD {
    my ($self) = @_;
    print STDERR 'CALLED '.__PACKAGE__."::BUILD\n";
}

__PACKAGE__->meta->make_immutable;

1;

Somehow, judging from the arguments in the call stack, my arguments to the Pattern->new call are ending up being passed to the TypeDecorator::new call and it's choking on them. I've verified that a good call to this subroutine (from and earlier stack trace) looks like this (note the two arguments):


DB<1> T
$ = MooseX::Types::TypeDecorator::new('MooseX::Types::TypeDecorator', ref(Moose::Meta::TypeConstraint)) called from file `/nfs/pdx/disks/nehalem.pde.077/perl/lib64/site_perl/MooseX/Types.pm' line 464


The problem is that I can't figure out how to debug what's going on. When stepping through the code, execution passes directly from the Pattern->new call to the TypeDecorator code. This is occurring prior to any of my class code executing. I know Moose is creating the new method for me, but I can't figure out how to debug code I can't look at.

I've looked through documentation on Moose, but that's all on how to use it as opposed to what's going on under the hood. I did read through the Class::MOP documentation, but I'm unclear as to exactly where this code is being created and when. While I've learned a fair bit from all my research, none of it has directly help me with my problem :)

First off, any ideas as to what's occurring would be appreciated. Second, how do I debug into this issue? All my usual debug tools have failed me! The execution is jumping directly from my new call to the problem code and I can't seem to trace where the TypeDecorator::new arguments are actually being passed from. Lastly, are there any good writeups out there on exactly how Moose does what it does? Or Class::MOP?

Edit - Here are my type definitions. I might add this is my first foray into Moose, so if you see anything I'm doing that's odd feel free to point it out.

package Program::Types;

use 5.012002;
use strict;
use warnings;

our $VERSION = sprintf "2.%03d", q($Revision: 473 $) =~ /: (\d+)/;

# predeclare types
use MooseX::Types
-declare => [qw(NonemptyStr FilePath DirectoryPath FilePathThatExists DirectoryPathThatExists
                TwoDigNum Pl LocalPl Pattern Program_Env Program_Whichload Program_Tpl
                Program_Plist Program_Bmfc Program_Tpl_Test Program_Tpl_Flow
                Program_Tpl_Flow_Item Program_Tpl_Flow_Item_Result Word)];

# import some MooseX builtin types that will be built on
use MooseX::Types::Moose qw(Str Int Object);

# types base on some objects that I use
class_type Pl, {class => 'Program::Plist::Pl'};

class_type LocalPl, {class => 'Program::Plist::LocalPl'};

class_type Pattern, {class => 'Program::Plist::Pl::Pattern'};

class_type Program_Env, {class => 'Program::Env'};

class_type Program_Whichload, {class => 'Program::Whichload'};

class_type Program_Tpl, {class => 'Program::Tpl'};

class_type Program_Tpl_Test, {class => 'Program::Tpl::Test'};

class_type Program_Tpl_Flow, {class => 'Program::Tpl::Flow'};

class_type Program_Tpl_Flow_Item, {class => 'Program::Tpl::Flow::Item'};

class_type Program_Tpl_Flow_Item_Result, {class => 'Program::Tpl::Flow::Item::Result'};

class_type Program_Plist, {class => 'Program::Plist'};

class_type Program_Bmfc, {class => 'Program::Bmfc'};

subtype Word,
    as Str,
    where {$_ =~ /^\w*$/};

coerce Word,
    from Str,
    via {$_};

subtype NonemptyStr,
  as Str,
  where {$_ ne ''};

coerce NonemptyStr,
  from Str,
  via {$_};

subtype TwoDigNum,
  as Int,
  where {$_ =~ /^\d\d\z/},
  message {'TwoDigNum must be made of two digits.'};

coerce TwoDigNum,
  from Int,
  via {$_};

subtype FilePath,
  as Str,
  where {!($_ =~ /\0/)},
  message {'FilePath cannot contain a null character'};

coerce FilePath,
  from Str,
  via {$_};

subtype DirectoryPath,
  as Str,
  where {!($_ =~ /\0/)},
  message {'DirectoryPath cannot contain a null character'};

coerce DirectoryPath,
  from Str,
  via {$_};

subtype FilePathThatExists,
  as Str,
  where {(!($_ =~ /\0/) and -e $_)},
  message {'FilePathThatExists must reference a path to a valid existing file.'.
           "Path ($_)"};

coerce FilePathThatExists,
  from Str,
  via {$_};

coerce FilePathThatExists,
  from FilePath,
  via {$_};

subtype DirectoryPathThatExists,
  as FilePath,
  where {(!($_ =~ /\0/) and -d $_)},
  message {'DirectoryPathThatExists must reference a path to a valid existing '.
           "directory.  Path ($_)"};

coerce DirectoryPathThatExists,
  from Str,
  via {$_};

coerce DirectoryPathThatExists,
  from DirectoryPath,
  via {$_};

1;

Edit2 -- Removed due to obvious operator error :) Note that I am using BUILDARGS in the Pattern class without returning the argument list. I have removed this in current code with no change to the error.

Phaylon, Here's the Program::Plist::Pl class.

package Program::Plist::Pl;

use 5.012002;
our $VERSION = sprintf "2.%03d", q($Revision: 473 $) =~ /: (\d+)/;

use Moose;
use namespace::autoclean;

use Program::Plist::Pl::Pattern;
use Program::Types qw(Pl LocalPl TwoDigNum Pattern);
use Program::Utils qw(rchomp);

use MooseX::Types::Moose qw(HashRef GlobRef Str);
use MooseX::Params::Validate;

with 'Program::Roles::PlHandler';

has 'name' => (isa => Str,
               is => 'ro',
               required => 1);

has 'parents' => (isa => HashRef[Pl|LocalPl],
                  is => 'ro',
                  required => 1);

has 'children' => (isa => HashRef[Pl|LocalPl],
                   is => 'ro');

has 'prefixes' => (isa => HashRef[TwoDigNum],
                   is => 'ro',
                   default => sub{{}});

has 'patterns' => (isa => HashRef[Pattern],
                   is => 'ro',
                   default => sub{{}});

sub _add_child {
    my ($self, $obj) = (shift,
                        pos_validated_list(\@_, {isa => Pl|LocalPl}));
    $self->{children}->{$obj->name} = $obj;
}

sub _add_pattern {
    my ($self, $obj) = (shift,
                        pos_validated_list(\@_, {isa => Pattern}));
    $self->{patterns}->{$obj->name} = $obj;
}

sub _create_pattern_obj {
    $DB::single = 1;
    my ($self, $name, $mask_data, $tag_data) = validated_list(\@_,
                                                              name => {isa => Str},
                                                              mask_data => {isa => Str, optional => 1},
                                                              tag_data => {isa => Str, optional => 1});

    $mask_data = '' if !defined $mask_data;

    my $tags = defined $tag_data ? map {$_ => 1} split(',', $tag_data) : {};

    $DB::single = 1;
    my $pattern_obj = Program::Plist::Pl::Pattern->new(name => $name,
                                                       mask_data => $mask_data,
                                                       tags => $tags);
    $self->_add_pattern($pattern_obj);
}

sub BUILD {
    my ($self, $fh) = (shift,
                       pos_validated_list([$_[0]->{fh}], {isa => GlobRef}));

    while (<$fh>) {
        # skip empty or commented lines
        rchomp;
        next if ((/^\s*#/) or (/^\s*$/));

        # handle global plist declarations
        if (my @m = /^\s*GlobalPList\s+(\w+)/) {
            # creating new object and adding it to our data print STDERR
            #                    "SELF($self)\n".join("\n",sort keys
            #                    %Program::Plist::Pl::)."\n"; 
            $self->_create_global_pl_obj(name => $m[0],
                                         parents => {%{$self->parents},
                                                     $self->name => $self},
                                         fh => $fh);
        }

        # handle local referenced plist declarations
        elsif (@m = /^\s*PList\s+(\w+):(\w+)/) {
            $self->_create_local_pl_obj(file => $m[0],
                                        name => $m[1]);
        }
        # handling pattern lines
        elsif (@m = /^\s*Pat\s+(\w+)\s*(\[.*\])?\s*;\s*(#([\w,])#)?\s*$/) {
            $self->_create_pattern_obj(name => $m[0],
                                       mask_data => do {defined $m[1] ? $m[1] : ''},
                                       tag_data => do {defined $m[2] ? $m[2] : ''});
        }
        # handling our patlist closure
        elsif (/^\s*\}/) {
            last;
        }
    }

    # need to populate our hash of child plists
    for (@{$self->data}) {
        if (($_->isa('Pl')) or ($_->isa('LocalPl'))) {
            $self->_add_child($_);
        }
    }
}

__PACKAGE__->meta->make_immutable;

1;
share|improve this question
    
Have you tried removing the MooseX::Types usage? There is nothing being done here that cannot be done with plain Moose types. It might not solve anything, but it is at least worth a try. –  Stevan Little Jan 7 '11 at 12:33
    
Do you have an exported 'Pattern' in your 'Program::Plist::Pl'? Could you show that file? –  phaylon Jan 7 '11 at 13:49
    
I could remove MooseX::Types, but there's a fair number of other files I'd have to go through and modify. I also hate to try to go around a problem I don't understand. I find this often results in recreating a similar or new problem later on down the road. I would much rather spend extra time debugging now and pinpoint the issue. Phaylon -- I have added the file's contents at the end of the original post. –  TJ Thompson Jan 7 '11 at 17:07
    
Skipping make_immutable may help make the control flow around the constructor more comprehensible. –  jrockway Jan 7 '11 at 21:37
    
Excellent idea. I am seeing a bit more, we'll see if it helps :) –  TJ Thompson Jan 7 '11 at 22:07

1 Answer 1

The problem is I believe here.

use Program::Types qw(Pl LocalPl TwoDigNum Pattern);

You're importing a function named Pattern into your Program::Plist::Pl class. You then call this function (unintentionally) here:

    my $pattern_obj = Program::Plist::Pl::Pattern->new(name => $name,
                                                   mask_data => $mask_data,
                                                   tags => $tags);

Specifically Program::Plist::Pl::Pattern resolves to your fully qualified function name rather than to the Class (technically package name) you're expecting. This function returns a TypeObject which you then call new() on.

Note: This is exactly what phaylon suggests in the comments above.

There really is no way to debug this except to know that you can always call a function with it's fully qualified name, and thus should never have a MooseX::Type and a valid Class name collide.

If it were me I'd start writing a very simple test case and add code to replicate the original file until it breaks. I'd probably start with the call to new. Then slowly add back assumptions until I found the one that breaks. Hopefully you add the MooseX::Types call early enough in that process that it triggers the "oh duh obviously that is it" moment.

share|improve this answer
    
You (and Phaylon) are absolutely correct. I did resolve this some time back in another question thread I had, but forgot to put it here! For some reason it didn't click in my head that the type definitions I'm importing with the Program::Types libraries are actually subroutines. The bad part is the naming convention in common use for type definitions (FirstLetterCapitalNoUnderscores) is the same naming convention used for packages. Now that I've figured that out, I have a new naming convention for type definitions that ensures they cannot accidentally collide with a package name. –  TJ Thompson Feb 10 '11 at 6:38

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.