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I am having some problems with mapping characters to a dictionary. What I am going for is

counter = { '!': 0, '"': 0, '#': 0, '$': 0 } ...

For all the ascii chars in the decimal ranges

range(33,64) range(91,96) and range(123,126)

After some time I discovered that map could possibly be used passing chr as the function and the list returned from range for iterations...

symbolMap = map(chr, range(33,64) + range (91,96) + range(123,126))

The problem is that this map does not corrospond to an ascii table, and it gets worse when I try

counter = dict.fromkeys( symbolMap, 0 )

see my shell session:

>>> counter
{'!': 0, '#': 0, '"': 0, '%': 0, '$': 0, "'": 0, '&': 0, ')': 0, '(': 0, '+': 0, '*': 0, '-': 0, ',': 0, '/': 0, '.': 0, '1': 0, '0': 0, '3': 0, '2': 0, '5': 0, '4': 0, '7': 0, '6': 0, '9': 0, '8': 0, ';': 0, ':': 0, '=': 0, '<': 0, '?': 0, '>': 0, '[': 0, ']': 0, '\\': 0, '_': 0, '^': 0, '{': 0, '}': 0, '|': 0}
>>> chr(34)
'"'
>>> range(33,64)
[33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39, 40, 41, 42, 43, 44, 45, 46, 47, 48, 49, 50, 51, 52, 53, 54, 55, 56, 57, 58, 59, 60, 61, 62, 63]
>>> symbolMap
['!', '"', '#', '$', '%', '&', "'", '(', ')', '*', '+', ',', '-', '.', '/', '0', '1', '2', '3', '4', '5', '6', '7', '8', '9', ':', ';', '<', '=', '>', '?', '[', '\\', ']', '^', '_', '{', '|', '}']

Can someone explain to me how to fix this so that it maps out correctly.

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2  
I guess I didn't read your question well enough as I have no idea what your problem is. The code that you posted displays your desired output. Are you thrown because the order isn't right? dicts don't have order. –  aaronasterling Jan 7 '11 at 7:05
1  
What is contained in counter that shouldn't be? What should be contained in counter that isn't? –  Karl Knechtel Jan 7 '11 at 8:27
    
If the codes you want should be numbers and punctuation in general, check out string.punctuation amd string.digits. –  Lennart Regebro Jan 7 '11 at 18:01
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3 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The order of dictionaries when printed is not by the value of the keys, nor does it need to be. The order depends which implementation of Python you are running, on CPython the order depends on the hash value of the key and the order of insertion.

For all intents and purposes, you should assume that the order is random.

In other words: Your code works!

This is clearer if you replace the 0 value with the number of the character:

>>> symbol_map = dict([(chr(x), x) for x in range(33,64) + range (91,96) + range(123,126)])
>>> symbol_map
{'!': 33, '#': 35, '"': 34, '%': 37, '$': 36, "'": 39, '&': 38, ')': 41, '(': 40, '+': 43, '*': 42, '-': 45, ',': 44, '/': 47, '.': 46, '1': 49, '0': 48, '3': 51, '2': 50, '5': 53, '4': 52, '7': 55, '6': 54, '9': 57, '8': 56, ';': 59, ':': 58, '=': 61, '<': 60, '?': 63, '>': 62, '[': 91, ']': 93, '\\': 92, '_': 95, '^': 94, '{': 123, '}': 125, '|': 124}

Here you see that each character maps correctly to the right ordinal of the character:

>>> symbol_map['/']
47

The order in the dictionary makes no difference, unless you need to print them out in a specific order. In this case you can do that by sorting:

>>> for x in sorted(symbol_map): print x,
... 
! " # $ % & ' ( ) * + , - . / 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 : ; < = > ? [ \ ] ^ _ { | }

But while using it you typically don't need the dictionary to be sorted as you access the directory by key.

Update: I thought these specific ranges was intentional, but if you want punctuation and digits in general, try this:

>>> import string
>>> symbol_map = dict([(x, 0) for x in string.punctuation + string.digits])
>>> symbol_map.keys()
['!', '#', '"', '%', '$', "'", '&', ')', '(', '+', '*', '-', ',', '/', '.', '1', '0', '3', '2', '5', '4', '7', '6', '9', '8', ';', ':', '=', '<', '?', '>', '@', '[', ']', '\\', '_', '^', '`', '{', '}', '|', '~']

The difference from yours is minor, it includes ~ for example, but still.

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Thank you so much, your code for assigning the dec value for each character made it obvious to me that my ranges were not correct for the symbol set I wanted so that later in my code I tried to increment the count for '@' I got a keyerror, ive corrected the problem thanks to your workings. –  Michael.E Jan 7 '11 at 17:56
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I would do something like

>>> codes = range(33,64) + range (91,96) + range(123,126)
>>> counter = dict((chr(c), 0) for c in codes)
>>> counter
{'!': 0, '#': 0, '"': 0, '%': 0, '$': 0, "'": 0, '&': 0, ')': 0, '(': 0, '+': 0, '*': 0,
 '-': 0, ',': 0, '/': 0, '.': 0, '1': 0, '0': 0, '3': 0, '2': 0, '5': 0, '4': 0, '7': 0, 
 '6': 0, '9': 0, '8': 0, ';': 0, ':': 0, '=': 0, '<': 0, '?': 0, '>': 0, '[': 0, ']': 0, 
 '\\': 0, '_': 0, '^': 0, '{': 0, '}': 0, '|': 0}

This just passes a sequence of tuples to the constructor for the dict class. The first element of each tuple is a character that you want in the map and the second is 0.

It's worth noting that this produces the same output that you request in the question up to the order of the dictionary which is unordered. You are already getting this output and your way is probably slightly faster but for a dict this size, that doesn't matter. Generator expressions are generally preferred to map and using the dict constructor is more canonical than dict.fromkeys. The way that I've shown communicates intent a little more clearly I believe. All together though, I'm not sure exactly what your problem is.

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2  
Also, {chr(c): 0 for c in codes} (dict comprehension) does the same thing with a nicer syntax if you're using Python 3 or 2.7. –  delnan Jan 7 '11 at 8:28
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You can preserve the order of how keys were inserted using the OrderedDict dictionary subclass in the collections module which was added in Python 2.7. This only affects how the dictionary displays itself, all other operations are the same as a regular dictionary. Using it will allow you to see its contents more clearly (but work the same as what you had which was OK).

>>> symbolMap = map(chr, range(33,64) + range (91,96) + range(123,126))
>>> symbolMap
['!', '"', '#', '$', '%', '&', "'", '(', ')', '*', '+', ',', '-', '.', 
'/', '0', '1', '2', '3', '4', '5', '6', '7', '8', '9', ':', ';', '<', 
'=', '>', '?', '[', '\\', ']', '^', '_', '{', '|', '}']
>>> from collections import OrderedDict
>>> counter = OrderedDict((chr(c),0) for c in range(33,64) + range(91,96) + range(123,126))
>>> counter
OrderedDict([('!', 0), ('"', 0), ('#', 0), ('$', 0), ('%', 0), ('&', 0), 
("'", 0), ('(', 0), (')', 0 ), ('*', 0), ('+', 0), (',', 0), ('-', 0), 
('.', 0), ('/', 0), ('0', 0), ('1', 0), ('2', 0), ('3', 0 ), ('4', 0), 
('5', 0), ('6', 0), ('7', 0), ('8', 0), ('9', 0), (':', 0), (';', 0), 
('<', 0), ('=', 0 ), ('>', 0), ('?', 0), ('[', 0), ('\\', 0), (']', 0), 
('^', 0), ('_', 0), ('{', 0), ('|', 0), ('}', 0)])
>>> counter['#'] = counter['#']+1
>>> counter
OrderedDict([('!', 0), ('"', 0), ('#', 1), ('$', 0), ('%', 0), ('&', 0), 
("'", 0), ('(', 0), (')', 0 ), ('*', 0), ('+', 0), (',', 0), ('-', 0), 
('.', 0), ('/', 0), ('0', 0), ('1', 0), ('2', 0), ('3', 0 ), ('4', 0), 
('5', 0), ('6', 0), ('7', 0), ('8', 0), ('9', 0), (':', 0), (';', 0), 
('<', 0), ('=', 0 ), ('>', 0), ('?', 0), ('[', 0), ('\\', 0), (']', 0), 
('^', 0), ('_', 0), ('{', 0), ('|', 0), ('}', 0)])

You don't really say what you want the dictionary for, but from its name and contents it looks like you want to count the occurrence of certain characters. In Python 2.7, the collections module also had another new class named Counter that was designed for that purpose. Here's how you could use it:

>>> from collections import Counter
>>> counts = Counter('%hello%; world!')
>>> counts
Counter({'l': 3, '%': 2, 'o': 2, '!': 1, ' ': 1, 'd': 1, 'h': 1, 'r': 1, 'w': 1, 'e': 1, ';': 1})
>>> chars = [chr(c) for c in range(33,64) + range(91,96) + range(123,126)]
>>> for c in chars:
...     if c in counts:
...             print repr(c), counts[c]
...
'!' 1
'%' 2
';' 1
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