Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

A base class have readonly field of type List<SomeEnum> which the derived classes will initialize. Now, there is a derived class in which I want to add the all the values of the SomeEnum. One way is to type all the enum values, but the enum is a little big, so is there any other way to do it?

public class Base
{
 private readonly List<SomeEnum> _list;

 protected Base(List<SomeEnum> list)
 {
  _list = list;
 }
}

public class Derived : Base
{
 public Derived() : base(new List<SomeEnum>() { Enum.GetValues(typeof(SomeEnum)) }
 {
 }
}

(The above code would not compile, I believe intializers don't accept arrays.)

share|improve this question
1  
You may want to accept IEnumerable<SomeEnum> or IList<SomeEnum> in the base constructor for future flexibility. –  Merlyn Morgan-Graham Jan 7 '11 at 7:34
    
Indeed, thanks for the tip! –  akif Jan 7 '11 at 7:54

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

It's because you have to cast the result of Enum.GetValues to the appropriate IEnumerable<T> type. See here:

using System.Linq;


public class Derived : Base
{
    public Derived()
        : base(new List<SomeEnum>(Enum.GetValues(typeof(SomeEnum)).OfType<SomeEnum>()))
    {
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
error: doesn't contain a definition for OfType –  akif Jan 7 '11 at 7:44
2  
You have to import System.Linq. –  Amy Jan 7 '11 at 7:49

That won't work because the collection initializer calls Add with your argument, and you can't add an Array to a List using the Add method (you'd need AddRange instead).

However there is a constructor for List<T> can accept IEnumerable<T>. Try this:

new List<SomeEnum>((IEnumerable<SomeEnum>)Enum.GetValues(typeof(SomeEnum)))
share|improve this answer
    
You beated me for a second.... –  David Conde Jan 7 '11 at 7:29
1  
This does not compile. Enum.GetValues returns an Array, which does not implement IEnumerable<T>. It is not a generic. –  Amy Jan 7 '11 at 7:36
1  
Yes, it doesn't compiles. –  akif Jan 7 '11 at 7:38
    
I don't know why this answer is being voted up. It doesn't work. See my answer for one that does work. –  Amy Jan 7 '11 at 7:40

As Mark wrote, there is a List constructor that accepts an enumerable, maybe you can leverage it the following (less coupled) way:

public class Base 
{     
  private readonly List<UserActions> _list;      

  protected Base(IEnumerable<UserActions> values)
  {         _list = new List<UserActions>(values);  
  } 
}  

public class Derived : Base 
{     
   public Derived() : base((UserActions[]) Enum.GetValues(typeof(UserActions))
  { 
  }
} 
share|improve this answer

Did you tried passing the array of values in the constructor of the list, like this:

public Derived() : 
         base(new List<SomeEnum>(Enum.GetValues(typeof(UserActions))) 
{}
share|improve this answer
1  
This does not work. Did you try it? –  Amy Jan 7 '11 at 7:33
    
Arrays do not implement IEnumerable. So the code doesn't compiles. –  akif Jan 7 '11 at 7:38
    
@hab: Actually arrays do implement IEnumerable. –  Mark Byers Jan 7 '11 at 14:37
base(new List<SomeEnum>(((IEnumerable<SomeEnum>)Enum.GetValues(typeof(SomeEnum)).GetEnumerator())))

I got it working by casting the enumerator returned to the generic type (which List accepts.)

share|improve this answer
    
Yes indeedy it does. :) –  Amy Jan 7 '11 at 7:52

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.