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I've got a rather large table (20+ columns) on an SQL server 2008. I'm using Microsofts SQL Server Management Studio to open the tables design view and add a column. After adding the column i move it up in the column sorting.

The image below shows the column i added and where i'm trying to move it to by just dragging it a few places up.

Column circeled is being added and moved up

After i've done this i'm getting an exception when i'm trying to open up the website. Everything works fine when i add the column without moving it up in the column sorting.

Can someone help me figuring out this problem. Is this an bug in MSSQL server, the management studio or is something else going wrong?

The exception

Operand type clash: bit is incompatible with uniqueidentifier

The stacktrace:

[SqlException (0x80131904): Operand type clash: bit is incompatible with uniqueidentifier]
   System.Data.SqlClient.SqlConnection.OnError(SqlException exception, Boolean breakConnection) +404
   System.Data.SqlClient.TdsParser.ThrowExceptionAndWarning() +412
   System.Data.SqlClient.TdsParser.Run(RunBehavior runBehavior, SqlCommand cmdHandler, SqlDataReader dataStream, BulkCopySimpleResultSet bulkCopyHandler, TdsParserStateObject stateObj) +1363
   System.Data.SqlClient.SqlDataReader.HasMoreRows() +301
   System.Data.SqlClient.SqlDataReader.ReadInternal(Boolean setTimeout) +422
   NHibernate.Driver.NHybridDataReader.Read() +28
   NHibernate.Loader.Loader.DoQuery(ISessionImplementor session, QueryParameters queryParameters, Boolean returnProxies) +1383
   NHibernate.Loader.Loader.DoQueryAndInitializeNonLazyCollections(ISessionImplementor session, QueryParameters queryParameters, Boolean returnProxies) +114
   NHibernate.Loader.Loader.DoList(ISessionImplementor session, QueryParameters queryParameters) +195

[ADOException: could not execute query
[ SELECT * from SomeFunction(@p0,@p1) ]
  Name:Id - Value:3429fb7e-dba3-4c74-b41b-6f2e0bbb33f8  Name:Moment - Value:7-1-2011 12:16:45
[SQL: SELECT * from SomeFunction(@p0,@p1)]]
   NHibernate.Loader.Loader.DoList(ISessionImplementor session, QueryParameters queryParameters) +637
   NHibernate.Loader.Loader.ListIgnoreQueryCache(ISessionImplementor session, QueryParameters queryParameters) +23
   NHibernate.Impl.SessionImpl.ListCustomQuery(ICustomQuery customQuery, QueryParameters queryParameters, IList results) +438
   NHibernate.Impl.SessionImpl.List(NativeSQLQuerySpecification spec, QueryParameters queryParameters, IList results) +373
   NHibernate.Impl.SessionImpl.List(NativeSQLQuerySpecification spec, QueryParameters queryParameters) +340
   NHibernate.Impl.SqlQueryImpl.List() +258
   CMS.ResourceAccess.DataAccessLogic.Repositories.NodeRepository.GetAncestors(Guid nodeId) in C:\Projects\Website\DataAccessLogic\Repositories\Repository.cs:228
   CMS.Business.Components.Services.NodeService.GetAncestors(Guid nodeId) in C:\Projects\Website\DataAccessLogic\Repositories\Service.cs:921
   CMS.Business.Components.Services.NodeService.GetSiteByNodeId(Guid nodeId) in C:\Projects\Website\DataAccessLogic\Repositories\Service.cs:1280
   Plugin.Wysiwyg.Business.Components.Services.WysiwygSearchService.RebuildIndex() +1232
   CMS.Business.Components.Services.SearchService.RebuildIndexForSites(IEnumerable 1 sites, ConfigurationManager configurationManager) in C:\Projects\Website\Services\Service.cs:303
   CMS.Business.Components.Services.SearchService.RebuildIndex() in C:\Projects\Website\DataAccessLogic\Repositories\Service.cs:252
   CMS.Backend.MvcApplication.Application_Start() in C:\Projects\Website\Global.asax.cs:49

[HttpException (0x80004005): could not execute query
[ SELECT * from SomeFunction(@p0,@p1) ]
  Name:Id - Value:3429fb7e-dba3-4c74-b41b-6f2e0bbb33f8  Name:Moment - Value:7-1-2011 12:16:45
[SQL: SELECT * from SomeFunction(@p0,@p1)]]
   System.Web.HttpApplicationFactory.EnsureAppStartCalledForIntegratedMode(HttpContext context, HttpApplication app) +3988565
   System.Web.HttpApplication.RegisterEventSubscriptionsWithIIS(IntPtr appContext, HttpContext context, MethodInfo[] handlers) +191
   System.Web.HttpApplication.InitSpecial(HttpApplicationState state, MethodInfo[] handlers, IntPtr appContext, HttpContext context) +325
   System.Web.HttpApplicationFactory.GetSpecialApplicationInstance(IntPtr appContext, HttpContext context) +407
   System.Web.Hosting.PipelineRuntime.InitializeApplication(IntPtr appContext) +375

[HttpException (0x80004005): could not execute query
[ SELECT * from SomeFunction(@p0,@p1) ]
  Name:Id - Value:3429fb7e-dba3-4c74-b41b-6f2e0bbb33f8  Name:Moment - Value:7-1-2011 12:16:45
[SQL: SELECT * from SomeFunction(@p0,@p1)]]
   System.Web.HttpRuntime.FirstRequestInit(HttpContext context) +11529072
   System.Web.HttpRuntime.EnsureFirstRequestInit(HttpContext context) +141
   System.Web.HttpRuntime.ProcessRequestNotificationPrivate(IIS7WorkerRequest wr, HttpContext context) +4784373

EDIT: I'm using NHibernate as ORM

share|improve this question
2  
It'll save you a great deal of time and energy in the future if you just add new columns at the end of existing tables. For SSMS to rearrange columns as above, it has to copy the entire table into a separate temp table, tear down any constraints referencing the current table, drop the current table, rename the temp table, and rebuild all of the constraints. Whereas adding a new nullable column at the end can be as simple as a metadata change. –  Damien_The_Unbeliever Jan 7 '11 at 13:33
    
@Damien I agree. The only time I wouldn't care is in an empty or almost empty / prototype DB. –  IanC Jan 7 '11 at 14:55
    
hmz, maybe that indeed is a good thing to do. Guess i could solve it for now by dropping the column, recreating it at the bottom and just don't care about the sorting.. –  Rob Jan 7 '11 at 15:01

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

There's a SELECT * lurking somewhere in your SQL code (possibly in the function, or a view it relies on), by my reckoning. This is just one of many reasons SELECT * is dangerous. Here's an example of something similar, to demonstrate one such failure mode:

create table dbo.T (
    ID int not null,
    FilterID uniqueidentifier not null,
    Val1 varchar(10) not null
)
go
insert into dbo.T (ID,FilterID,Val1)
select 1,'00000000-0000-0000-0000-000000000000','abc'
go
create view dbo.V
as
    select * from dbo.T
go
create function dbo.F ()
returns table
as
    return (select ID,Val1 from dbo.V where FilterID='00000000-0000-0000-0000-000000000000')
go
select * from dbo.F()
go

The above returns a single result row, as expected. Now we perform the change the same way SSMS will be doing, behind the scenes:

create table dbo.Temp_T (
    ID int not null,
    Flag bit null,
    FilterID uniqueidentifier not null,
    Val1 varchar(10) not null
)
go
insert into dbo.Temp_T (ID,FilterID,Val1)
select ID,FilterID,Val1 from dbo.T
go
drop table dbo.T
go
sp_rename 'dbo.Temp_T','T'
go

And now we query our F function again:

select * from dbo.F()

And we get:

Conversion failed when converting the varchar value '00000000-0000-0000-0000-000000000000' to data type bit.


In fact, if I modify the F function to be:

create function dbo.F ()
returns table
as
    return (select ID,Val1 from dbo.V where FilterID=CONVERT(uniqueidentifier,'00000000-0000-0000-0000-000000000000'))
go

I can get:

Operand type clash: uniqueidentifier is incompatible with bit

share|improve this answer
1  
+1 for the good explaination! Definately gave me something to think about. –  Rob Jan 7 '11 at 13:59
    
I edited the question with an possible cause –  Rob Jan 7 '11 at 14:28
    
@Rob - as I've shown, the error "operand type clash..." is purely an SQL one, no need to think about what code is invoking the SQL. So to diagnose it further, we'd need to see the actual code of the UDF (and anything that it depends upon) –  Damien_The_Unbeliever Jan 7 '11 at 14:42
3  
@Rob - glad to help. If you want to make these kind of situations easier to detect in the future, consider turning on SCHEMABINDING on your views and functions. You'd then get error messages when attempting to modify the table(s) they depend on, but the error messages tell you exactly which views/functions are going to be affected by the change. –  Damien_The_Unbeliever Jan 7 '11 at 15:32
1  
@Damien, thanks for the tipbout schemabinding! Will keep it in mind! –  Rob Jan 8 '11 at 11:14

How are you accessing your table from code?? The error would indicate that somewhere in your code, you access the table and your code depends on the sequence of the columns.

Since you moved away your column to another place, now suddenly your code is trying to access column no. 17 (or whatever) and assumes that this is a uniqueidentifier column - but that's no longer the case, since you reorganized your table's column order....

share|improve this answer
    
I'm working on an asp.net/C# application and i use NHibernate as ORM to map the entities from my application to the database. But i'm quite sure the problem is caused on database level or by management studio. Because when i don't move the column, everything works just fine. But that's not what i want since it's quite a big table and i also want to keep it readable and maintanable at database-level –  Rob Jan 7 '11 at 12:16
    
@ROb: and did you update the NHibernate mapping file to reflect the change in the table's columns, in their order and type?? –  marc_s Jan 7 '11 at 12:17
1  
You see this in the error message: SELECT * from SomeFunction(@p0,@p1) - seems there's a SELECT * in there...... could it be that that function depends on the order of the columns?? –  marc_s Jan 7 '11 at 12:18
1  
@marc_s. the mapping file was updated. DOn't know about the order in the funtion, was made by a collegue so i'll have to check that out –  Rob Jan 7 '11 at 12:19
    
@marc_s i checked the function. It does nothing more then checking some data in another table depending on the data in this table when somethings is requested from it. And this is done by the primary key which is an Uniqueidentiefier –  Rob Jan 7 '11 at 12:41

Simply recompile all views, stored procedures, UDFs, and TVF's that reference this table.

SQL Server converts the column names to numbers internally. When you shift columns around, this causes unexpected conditions when cached query plans are run.

I believe you can also just restart SQL Server to cause it to flush all plans. I haven't tried this, though.

share|improve this answer
1  
If you take my example, but re-write the view to specify columns, everything works - so it appears that this type of caching only occurs when it's had to perform a schema lookup because the view specified "select *" rather than having a column list. It's much to be preferred that the OP actually find that piece of rot in their codebase. –  Damien_The_Unbeliever Jan 7 '11 at 14:57
1  
100% agreed. If I recall correctly, sometimes a recompile is needed even when the columns are stipulated but have been changed in the schema. –  IanC Jan 7 '11 at 15:04
    
Can't try this at this time, but thanks for the good tip! Whenever the problem occurs again i'll try it out. Though you haven't tried it also seems a good solution to me! Will keep it in mind. –  Rob Jan 7 '11 at 15:20

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