Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am having a general problem finding a good algorithm for generating each possible assignment for some integers in different arrays.

Lets say I have n arrays and m numbers (I can have more arrays than numbers, more numbers than arrays or as much arrays as numbers).

As an example I have the numbers 1,2,3 and three arrays:

{ }, { }, { }

Now I would like to find each of these solutions:

{1,2,3}, { }, { }
{ }, {1,2,3}, { }
{ }, { }, {1,2,3}
{1,2}, {3}, { }
{1,2}, { }, {3}
{ }, {1,2}, {3}
{1}, {2,3}, { }
{1}, { }, {2,3}
{ }, {1}, {2,3}
{1}, {2}, {3}

So basically I would like to find each possible combination to assign the numbers to the different arrays with keeping the order. So as in the example the 1 always needs to come before the others and so on...

I want to write an algorithm in C++/Qt to find all these valid combinations.

Does anybody have an approach for me on how to handle this problem? How would I generate these permutations?

ADDITIONS

Unfortunately I didn't manage to change the great examples you gave for the problem I have now, since the numbers that I want to arrange in the arrays are stored in an array (or for me a QVector)

Can anybody help me change the algorithm so that it gives me each possible valid combination of the numbers in the QVector to the QVector< QVector > so that I can do further computations on each one?

QVector<int> line; // contains the numbers: like {7,3,6,2,1}
QVector< QVector<int> > buckets; // empty buckets for the numbers { {}, {}, {} }

QList< QVector< QVector<int> > > result; // List of all possible results

Would be really great if anyone could provide me with a simple implementation that works or tips on how to get it... I just couldn't change the code that was already provided so that it works...

share|improve this question
    
there are actually too many ways this can be solved.. but i'm thinking which one would be the best! –  Nawaz Jan 7 '11 at 11:49

5 Answers 5

up vote 0 down vote accepted
+50

The following code is written in C#.

class LineList<T> : List<T[][]> 
{
    public override string ToString()
    {
        var sb = new StringBuilder();
        sb.Append(Count).AppendLine(" lines:");
        foreach (var line in this)
        {
            if (line.Length > 0)
            {
                foreach (var bucket in line)
                {
                    sb.Append('{');
                    foreach (var item in bucket)
                    {
                        sb.Append(item).Append(',');
                    }
                    if (bucket.Length > 0)
                    {
                        sb.Length -= 1;
                    }
                    sb.Append("}, ");
                }
                sb.Length -= 2;
            }
            sb.AppendLine();
        }
        return sb.ToString();
    }
}

class Permutor<T>
{
    public T[] Items { get; private set; }
    public bool ReuseBuckets { get; set; }
    private T[] emptyBucket_;
    private Dictionary<int, Dictionary<int, T[]>> buckets_;   // for memoization when ReuseBuckets=true
    public Permutor(T[] items)
    {
        ReuseBuckets = true;  // faster and uses less memory
        Items = items;
        emptyBucket_ = new T[0];
        buckets_ = new Dictionary<int, Dictionary<int, T[]>>();
    }
    private T[] GetBucket(int index, int size)
    {
        if (size == 0)
        {
            return emptyBucket_;
        }
        Dictionary<int, T[]> forIndex;
        if (!buckets_.TryGetValue(index, out forIndex))
        {
            forIndex = new Dictionary<int, T[]>();
            buckets_[index] = forIndex;
        }
        T[] bucket;
        if (!forIndex.TryGetValue(size, out bucket))
        {
            bucket = new T[size];
            Array.Copy(Items, index, bucket, 0, size);
            forIndex[size] = bucket;
        }
        return bucket;
    }
    public LineList<T> GetLines(int bucketsPerLine)
    {
        var lines = new LineList<T>();
        if (bucketsPerLine > 0)
        {
            AddLines(lines, bucketsPerLine, 0);
        }
        return lines;
    }
    private void AddLines(LineList<T> lines, int bucketAllotment, int taken)
    {
        var start = bucketAllotment == 1 ? Items.Length - taken : 0;
        var stop = Items.Length - taken;
        for (int nItemsInNextBucket = start; nItemsInNextBucket <= stop; nItemsInNextBucket++)
        {
            T[] nextBucket;
            if (ReuseBuckets)
            {
                nextBucket = GetBucket(taken, nItemsInNextBucket);
            }
            else
            {
                nextBucket = new T[nItemsInNextBucket];
                Array.Copy(Items, taken, nextBucket, 0, nItemsInNextBucket);
            }
            if (bucketAllotment > 1)
            {
                var subLines = new LineList<T>();
                AddLines(subLines, bucketAllotment - 1, taken + nItemsInNextBucket);
                foreach (var subLine in subLines)
                {
                    var line = new T[bucketAllotment][];
                    line[0] = nextBucket;
                    subLine.CopyTo(line, 1);
                    lines.Add(line);
                }
            }
            else
            {
                var line = new T[1][];
                line[0] = nextBucket;
                lines.Add(line);
            }
        }
    }

}

These calls...

var permutor = new Permutor<int>(new[] { 1, 2, 3 });
for (int bucketsPerLine = 0; bucketsPerLine <= 4; bucketsPerLine++)
{
    Console.WriteLine(permutor.GetLines(bucketsPerLine));
}

generate this output...

0 lines:

1 lines:
{1,2,3}

4 lines:
{}, {1,2,3}
{1}, {2,3}
{1,2}, {3}
{1,2,3}, {}

10 lines:
{}, {}, {1,2,3}
{}, {1}, {2,3}
{}, {1,2}, {3}
{}, {1,2,3}, {}
{1}, {}, {2,3}
{1}, {2}, {3}
{1}, {2,3}, {}
{1,2}, {}, {3}
{1,2}, {3}, {}
{1,2,3}, {}, {}

20 lines:
{}, {}, {}, {1,2,3}
{}, {}, {1}, {2,3}
{}, {}, {1,2}, {3}
{}, {}, {1,2,3}, {}
{}, {1}, {}, {2,3}
{}, {1}, {2}, {3}
{}, {1}, {2,3}, {}
{}, {1,2}, {}, {3}
{}, {1,2}, {3}, {}
{}, {1,2,3}, {}, {}
{1}, {}, {}, {2,3}
{1}, {}, {2}, {3}
{1}, {}, {2,3}, {}
{1}, {2}, {}, {3}
{1}, {2}, {3}, {}
{1}, {2,3}, {}, {}
{1,2}, {}, {}, {3}
{1,2}, {}, {3}, {}
{1,2}, {3}, {}, {}
{1,2,3}, {}, {}, {}

The approximate size of the solution (bucketsPerLine * NumberOfLines) dominates the execution time. For these tests, N is the length of the input array and the bucketsPerLine is set to N as well.

N=10, solutionSize=923780, elapsedSec=0.4, solutionSize/elapsedMS=2286
N=11, solutionSize=3879876, elapsedSec=2.1, solutionSize/elapsedMS=1835
N=12, solutionSize=16224936, elapsedSec=10.0, solutionSize/elapsedMS=1627
N=13, solutionSize=67603900, elapsedSec=47.9, solutionSize/elapsedMS=1411
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you! I'll have a look and see if that works for me... but one question: where do you enter the list of buckets? Because I can't find in your code where I set how many buckets there are on which the numbers should to be arranged in. –  evident Feb 5 '11 at 20:45
    
Have another look now. I changed my terminology to match yours and added the parameter you are looking for. Previously I had assumed the number of buckets per line would always equal the number of items in the input array. But now it can be a different value. –  Fantius Feb 5 '11 at 21:49
    
Thank you for your great help and the different revisions!!! I've managed to get this working for me and it is a fine solution!!! Thanks so much and here is your bounty... ;-) –  evident Feb 6 '11 at 13:44
    
You're welcome. It was a fun distraction. –  Fantius Feb 6 '11 at 14:22

This will be easy with backtracking recursion. You should track which array you are filling and which number you are up to. Something like that:

void gen(int arrayN, int number)
{
   if (number == MAX_NUMBER + 1) //We have a solution
   {
        printSolution();
        return;
   }

   if (arrayN == MAX_ARRAYS + 1) //No solution
       return;

   gen(arrayN + 1, number); //Skip to next array

   for (int i = number; i <= MAX_NUMBER; i++)
   {
       //Save at this line the numbers into an array for the solution
       gen(arrayN + 1, i + 1); //Used the numbers from "number" to "i" inclusive
   }
}

gen(0, 1);
share|improve this answer
    
You forget that some arrays may be empty. But +1 anyway. –  Nikita Rybak Jan 7 '11 at 12:01
    
@Nikita - I have a skip step - //Skip to next array –  Petar Minchev Jan 7 '11 at 12:01
    
My bad. Could've been included in the loop :) –  Nikita Rybak Jan 7 '11 at 12:02

This smells like recursion. First calculate the combinations for putting m-1 in n arrays. Then you get n more solutions by putting the first number in either of the n arrays in those solutions.

share|improve this answer
    
Simple and good! –  ltjax Jan 7 '11 at 12:14
#include <vector>
#include <list>
#include <iostream>

class NestedCollection {
public:
    std::vector<std::list<int> > lists;

    NestedCollection(int n)
    : lists(n, std::list<int>())
    {};

    NestedCollection(const NestedCollection& other)
    : lists(other.lists)
    {};

    std::vector<NestedCollection> computeDistributions(int n, int m, int last_possible_index) {
        std::vector<NestedCollection> result;
        // iterate over all possible lists (invariant: last_possible_index >= i >= 0)
        // or skip if there is no number left to distribute (invariant: m>0)
        for(int i=last_possible_index; i>=0 && m>0 ; --i) {
            NestedCollection variation(*this);
            // insert the next number
            variation.lists[i].push_front(m);
            // recurse with all following numbers
            std::vector<NestedCollection> distributions = variation.computeDistributions(n, m-1, i);
            if(distributions.empty()) // we could also write if(m==1) - this guards the end of the recursion
                result.push_back(variation);
            else
                result.insert(result.end(), distributions.begin(), distributions.end() );
        }
        return result;
    };

    static std::vector<NestedCollection> findAllDistributions(int n, int m) {
        std::vector<NestedCollection> result;
        result = NestedCollection(n).computeDistributions(n, m, n-1);
        return result;
    };
};

int main() {
    int n=3, m=3;
    std::vector<NestedCollection> result = NestedCollection::findAllDistributions(n, m);
    for(std::vector<NestedCollection>::iterator it = result.begin(); it!=result.end(); ++it) {
        for(std::vector<std::list<int> >::iterator jt = it->lists.begin(); jt!=it->lists.end(); ++jt) {
            std::cout<<"{";
            for(std::list<int>::iterator kt = jt->begin(); kt!=jt->end(); ++kt) {
                std::cout<<*kt<<", ";
            }
            std::cout<<"} ";
        }
        std::cout<<std::endl;
    }
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
This is a very good version and works perfectly... thank you! –  evident Jan 7 '11 at 12:55
    
seems like a nice programming skills assessment test. –  mschneider Jan 7 '11 at 13:14
    
No its for some bigger project... what you wrote is just some basic thinking for what I need to do... but I was just hanging on that problem and couldnt see a way to find the combinations easily... –  evident Jan 7 '11 at 13:59
    
I've been trying to work on that now for a while but am not able to rebuild this implementation using a QVector<QVector<int> > where the nested collections are saved and a QVector<int> containing the integers that need to be organized into the different vectors. Could you maybe give me an implementation or tips on how to achieve this? Would be really great! –  evident Feb 1 '11 at 22:14

It breaks down in this case to where the 2 partitions are. There are 4 possible locations so that would be 16 combinations but it isn't because you remove "duplicates". A bit like domino tiles. You have 4 "doubles" here and the 12 singles reduce to 6 so you have 10 combinations.

You can generate it selecting the first one, then generating the second as >= the first.

The first can be 0, 1, 2 or 3. 0 means it appears before the 1. 3 means it appears after the 3.

In your 10 solutions above the partitions are at:

1: 3 and 3 2: 0 and 3 3: 0 and 0 4: 2 and 3 5: 2 and 2 6: 0 and 2 7: 1 and 3 8: 1 and 1 9: 0 and 1 10: 1 and 2

If you generated in algorithmic order you would probably produce them 0 and 0, 0 and 1, 0 and 2, 0 and 3, 1 and 1, 1 and 2, 1 and 3, 2 and 2, 2 and 3, 3 and 3 although you could of course do them in reverse order.

In your examples above look at the positions of the commas and the number immediately to their left. If there are no numbers immediately to their left then it is 0.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.