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How can I find all cyles in a directed graph with multi edges?

Graph example 1:

Graph 1

Cycles:

1-2-6
1-2-3-4
1-2-3-4-5-6
1-2-6-5-3-4
3-4-5
5-6

Graph example 2 (multi-edge 4/5):

Graph 2

Cycles:

1-2-3
1-4
1-5

Notes:

I don't want to detect a cycle (boolean result), I want to list all cycles.

Any Strongly connected component algorithm is not sufficient for my problem (it would find only one component in both examples).

I'm using the QuickGraph implementation in C#, but I would be happy to see an algorithm in any language.

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1  
in the second example wouldn't be solutions as well 2-3-1 and 3-1-2 ? –  msalvadores Jan 7 '11 at 15:05
1  
@msalvadores, no ofcourse not. A cycle is a chain of nodes, irrespective of permutations. If you'd start the cycle elsewhere, that wouldn't change the cycle, right? That would be like saying if you'd move your glass from one side to the other side of a table, it wouldn't be the same glass anymore.... –  JBSnorro Jan 7 '11 at 15:19
    
I think that it is discussable. A cycle could be consider different depending on the order of edges you traverse. But it all comes down to what your application needs. If in your case 2-3-1 is the same as 3-1-2 then fair enough. I might need to rework my anwser since I give back all permutations of the same cycle. –  msalvadores Jan 7 '11 at 15:43
    
Agreed. Actually I'd rather debate the cycle 1-2-3-4-5-6 in the first example. That's no cycle, it contains 2 cycles! –  JBSnorro Jan 7 '11 at 15:49
    
yes, 1-2-3-4-5-6 contains 2 cycles and it contains duplicated vertices (a), but it is a cycle, which doesn't contain duplicated paths (like 5-6-5-6). –  ulrichb Jan 7 '11 at 16:52

2 Answers 2

I had fun with this question, thanks! :P

I have a solution in C#. The algorithm to find the cycles is very short(~10 lines), but there is a lot of clutter around it(implementations of the classes Node and Edge for instance).

I've used the variable naming convention that the letter "e" represents an edge, the letter "a" the node where the edge start, and "b" the node it links to. With those conventions, this is the algorithm:

public static IEnumerable<Cycle> FindAllCycles()
{
    HashSet<Node> alreadyVisited = new HashSet<Node>();
    alreadyVisited.Add(Node.AllNodes[0]);
    return FindAllCycles(alreadyVisited, Node.AllNodes[0]);
}
private static IEnumerable<Cycle> FindAllCycles(HashSet<Node> alreadyVisited, Node a)
{
    for (int i = 0; i < a.Edges.Count; i++)
    {
        Edge e = a.Edges[i];
        if (alreadyVisited.Contains(e.B))
        {
            yield return new Cycle(e);
        }
        else
        {
            HashSet<Node> newSet = i == a.Edges.Count - 1 ? alreadyVisited : new HashSet<Node>(alreadyVisited);
            newSet.Add(e.B);
            foreach (Cycle c in FindAllCycles(newSet, e.B))
            {
                c.Build(e);
                yield return c;
            }
        }
    }
}

It has an optimization to reuse some Hashsets, and that might be confusing. I've included the following code, which produces exactly the same results, but this implementation doesn't have optimizations, so you can figure out more easily how it works.

private static IEnumerable<Cycle> FindAllCyclesUnoptimized(HashSet<Node> alreadyVisited, Node a)
{
    foreach (Edge e in a.Edges)
        if (alreadyVisited.Contains(e.B))
            yield return new Cycle(e);
        else
        {
            HashSet<Node> newSet = new HashSet<Node>(alreadyVisited);
            newSet.Add(e.B);//EDIT: thnx dhsto
            foreach (Cycle c in FindAllCyclesUnoptimized(newSet, e.B))
            {
                c.Build(e);
                yield return c;
            }
        }
}

This uses the following implementations of Node, Edge and Cycle. They're pretty straightforward, although I did put a lot of thought in making everything immutable and members as least accessible as possible.

public sealed class Node
{
    public static readonly ReadOnlyCollection<Node> AllNodes;
    internal static readonly List<Node> allNodes;
    static Node()
    {
        allNodes = new List<Node>();
        AllNodes = new ReadOnlyCollection<Node>(allNodes);
    }
    public static void SetReferences()
    {//call this method after all nodes have been created
        foreach (Edge e in Edge.AllEdges)
            e.A.edge.Add(e);
    }

    //All edges linking *from* this node, not to it. 
    //The variablename "Edges" it quite unsatisfactory, but I couldn't come up with anything better.
    public ReadOnlyCollection<Edge> Edges { get; private set; }
    internal List<Edge> edge;
    public int Index { get; private set; }
    public Node(params int[] nodesIndicesConnectedTo)
    {
        this.edge = new List<Edge>(nodesIndicesConnectedTo.Length);
        this.Edges = new ReadOnlyCollection<Edge>(edge);
        this.Index = allNodes.Count;
        allNodes.Add(this);
        foreach (int nodeIndex in nodesIndicesConnectedTo)
            new Edge(this, nodeIndex);
    }
    public override string ToString()
    {
        return this.Index.ToString();
    }
}
public sealed class Edge
{
    public static readonly ReadOnlyCollection<Edge> AllEdges;
    static readonly List<Edge> allEdges;
    static Edge()
    {
        allEdges = new List<Edge>();
        AllEdges = new ReadOnlyCollection<Edge>(allEdges);
    }

    public int Index { get; private set; }
    public Node A { get; private set; }
    public Node B { get { return Node.allNodes[this.bIndex]; } }
    private readonly int bIndex;

    internal Edge(Node a, int bIndex)
    {
        this.Index = allEdges.Count;
        this.A = a;
        this.bIndex = bIndex;
        allEdges.Add(this);
    }
    public override string ToString()
    {
        return this.Index.ToString();
    }
}
public sealed class Cycle
{
    public readonly ReadOnlyCollection<Edge> Members;
    private List<Edge> members;
    private bool IsComplete;
    internal void Build(Edge member)
    {
        if (!IsComplete)
        {
            if (member == members[0]) 
                IsComplete = true;
            else
                this.members.Add(member);
        }
    }
    internal Cycle(Edge firstMember)
    {
        this.members = new List<Edge>();
        this.members.Add(firstMember);
        this.Members = new ReadOnlyCollection<Edge>(this.members);
    }
    public override string ToString()
    {
        StringBuilder result = new StringBuilder();
        foreach (var member in this.members)
        {
            result.Append(member.Index.ToString());
            if (member != members[members.Count - 1])
                result.Append(", ");
        }
        return result.ToString();
    }
}

Then to illustrate how you might use this small API, I have implemented your two examples. Basically it comes down to, create all the nodes by specifying to which nodes they link, then call SetReferences() to, well.... set some references. After that, calling the publicly accessible FindAllCycles() should return all cycles. I've excluded any code to reset the static members, but that is easily implemented. It should just clear all static lists.

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    InitializeExampleGraph1();//or: InitializeExampleGraph2();
    Node.SetReferences();
    var allCycles = FindAllCycles().ToList();
}
static void InitializeExampleGraph1()
{
    new Node(1, 2);//says that the first node(node a) links to b and c.
    new Node(2);//says that the second node(node b) links to c.
    new Node(0, 3);//says that the third node(node c) links to a and d.
    new Node(0);//etc
}
static void InitializeExampleGraph2()
{
    new Node(1);
    new Node(0, 0, 2);
    new Node(0);
}

I must note that the indices of the edges in these examples do NOT correspond to the indices in your images, but that is avoidable with a simple lookup. The results: allCycles is for the first example:

{3, 2, 0}
{5, 4, 2, 0}
{3, 1}
{5, 4, 1}

allCycles is for the second example:

{1, 0}
{2, 0}
{4, 3, 0}

I hope you are satisfied with this solution and that you use it. I've barely commented on the code, so I know it might be hard to understand. In that case, please ask and I'll comment on it!

share|improve this answer
    
Just a note: in the FindAllCyclesUnoptimized method the HashSet remains empty the entire time. I tried to make an edit but it was rejected. I believe it just needs newSet.Add(e.B); after the newSet declaration in order to match the function above, but I may be wrong. –  David Sherret Sep 19 '13 at 13:20

What about using Breadth-first search to find all paths between nodes A and B - lets call that function get_all_paths

To find all cycles you just need to:

cycles = []
for x in nodes:
    cycles += get_all_paths(x,x) 

get_all_paths(x,x) because a cycle is just a path that starts and ends in the same node.

Just an alternative solution - I hope it gives new ideas.

Edit

Another option is to compute all the posible paths and check every time that the first edge starts where the last edge finishes - a cycle.

Here you can see the Python code for it.

def paths_rec(path,edges):
    if len(path) > 0 and path[0][0] == path[-1][1]:
        print "cycle", path
        return #cut processing when find a cycle

    if len(edges) == 0:
        return

    if len(path) == 0:
        #path is empty so all edges are candidates for next step
        next_edges = edges
    else:
        #only edges starting where the last one finishes are candidates
        next_edges = filter(lambda x: path[-1][1] == x[0], edges)

    for edge in next_edges:
        edges_recursive = list(edges)
        edges_recursive.remove(edge)
        #recursive call to keep on permuting possible path combinations
        paths_rec(list(path) + [edge], edges_recursive)


def all_paths(edges):
    paths_rec(list(),edges)

if __name__ == "__main__":
    #edges are represented as (node,node) 
    # so (1,2) represents 1->2 the edge from node 1 to node 2. 
    edges = [(1,2),(2,3),(3,4),(4,2),(2,1)]
    all_paths(edges)
share|improve this answer
    
@ulrichb I edited my answer with a solution using typical case of recursion to permute all posible paths. I hope it helps. –  msalvadores Jan 7 '11 at 15:03
    
Thank you so much for sharing, very very nice job! +1 –  Melsi Mar 5 '12 at 0:26

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