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Given the following XML fragment:

<foo>
  <bar>1</bar>
  <bar>2</bar>
  <bar>3</bar>
</foo>

The following XSL should work:

<xsl:template match="/">
  <xsl:apply-templates
    mode="items"
    select="bar" />
</xsl:template>

<xsl:template mode="items" match="bar">
  <xsl:value-of select="." />
</xsl:template>

Is there a way I can use a similar format to this to apply a template when there are no <bar/> entities? For example:

<xsl:template match="/">
  <xsl:apply-templates
    mode="items"
    select="bar" />
</xsl:template>

<xsl:template mode="items" match="bar">
  <xsl:value-of select="." />
</xsl:template>

<xsl:template mode="items" match="none()">
  There are no items.
</xsl:template>
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Good question, +1. See my answer for exlanation and a complete, short solution that uses only templates and no explicit conditional XSLT instructions. :) –  Dimitre Novatchev Jan 7 '11 at 13:49
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4 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

One could also use this pattern to avoid extra chooses:

<xsl:template match="/*">
    <xsl:apply-templates select="bar" mode="items"/>
    <xsl:apply-templates select="(.)[not(bar)]" mode="show-absence-message"/>
</xsl:template>

<xsl:template match="bar" mode="items">
    <xsl:value-of select="."/>
</xsl:template>

<xsl:template match="/*" mode="show-absence-message">
    There are no items.
</xsl:template>
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Worked perfectly! Thanks!! –  Ed DeGagne Jul 30 '12 at 20:01
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Yes.

But the logic should be:

<xsl:template match="foo">
   <xsl:apply-templates select="bar"/>
</xsl:template>

<xsl:template match="foo[not(bar)]">
   There are no items. 
</xsl:template> 

Note: It's foo element which is having or not having bar children.

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+1. Better answer. –  Flack Jan 7 '11 at 13:37
    
Upvoted, but I've gone with @Flack's answer as sometime's it's not possible to use the parent context. –  unpluggd Jan 7 '11 at 13:54
    
@digitala: No problem. But always it's possible to use this pattern matching. @Flack's answer use a push style (xsl:apply-tempates/@select) and modes (xsl:apply-tempates/@mode) instead of this pull style. –  user357812 Jan 7 '11 at 15:59
    
@Alejandro. I agree, your solution has a better design, I just provided a valid alternative (mostly because you were faster :)), which can be sometimes convinient. –  Flack Jan 7 '11 at 19:47
    
@Flack: Sorry for the notification, ja! I was just telling to the OP that the real difference is between push and pull style. –  user357812 Jan 7 '11 at 20:04
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No, when you have apply-templates select="bar" and the context node does not have any bar child elements then no nodes are processed and therefore no templates are applied. You could however change your code in the template doing the apply-templates to e.g.

  <xsl:choose>
     <xsl:when test="bar">
        <xsl:apply-templates select="bar"/>
     </xsl:when>
     <xsl:otherwise>There are not items.</xsl:otherwise>
  </xsl:choose>
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add comment

Given the following XML fragment:

<foo>
    <bar>1</bar>
    <bar>2</bar>
    <bar>3</bar>
</foo>

The following XSL should work:

<xsl:template match="/">
 <xsl:apply-templates mode="items" select="bar" />
</xsl:template>

<xsl:template mode="items" match="bar">
 <xsl:value-of select="." />
</xsl:template>

No, the <xsl:apply-templates> above doesn't select any node at all.

Is there a way I can use a similar format to this to apply a template when there are no entities?

Yes:

<xsl:stylesheet version="1.0"
 xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform">
 <xsl:output omit-xml-declaration="yes" indent="yes"/>

    <xsl:template match="/*[not(bar)]">
      No <bar/> s.
    </xsl:template>

    <xsl:template match="/*[bar]">
      <xsl:value-of select="count(bar)"/> <bar/> s.
    </xsl:template>
</xsl:stylesheet>

when applied to the provided XML document:

<foo>
    <bar>1</bar>
    <bar>2</bar>
    <bar>3</bar>
</foo>

the result is:

3<bar/> s.

When applied to this XML document:

<foo>
    <baz>1</baz>
    <baz>2</baz>
    <baz>3</baz>
</foo>

the result is:

  No <bar/> s.
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