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Hey guys, I have a couple bits of code that seem like they could be condensed but I'm not sure how.

The code I have is this

var checkForUnitReferred = function () {
    $("#LeadForm").toggle($("#Claim_UnitReferredNoNull").is(":checked"));
};
checkForUnitReferred();

$("#Claim_UnitReferredNoNull").change(function() {
    checkForUnitReferred();        
});

It basically checks if a checkbox is checked and displays a form, otherwise it hides it. What I would rather have is something like this

var checkForUnitReferred = (function() {
    $("#LeadForm").toggle($("#Claim_UnitReferredNoNull").is(":checked"));
})();

$("#Claim_UnitReferredNoNull").change(function() {
    checkForUnitReferred();        
});

I know this doesn't work but I think something like that would be cleaner. Anyone know of a way to accomplish this?

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1  
You mean you want to call checkForUnitReferred initially and then on each change event? I wouldn't say your second piece of code is necessarily any cleaner... –  El Ronnoco Jan 7 '11 at 14:21
    
Yeah that's what I want to do, I just don't like declaring a function and then calling it immediately, I'd rather it be called when declared and be passable –  Jimmy Jan 7 '11 at 14:50
    
+1 for hypnotoad...+1 for hypnotoad...+1 for hypnotoad... –  Steve May 9 '12 at 6:22
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2 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

How about this:

var checkForUnitReferred;

(checkForUnitReferred = function() {
    $("#LeadForm").toggle($("#Claim_UnitReferredNoNull").is(":checked"));
})();

$("#Claim_UnitReferredNoNull").change(function() {
    checkForUnitReferred();        
});

This is possible because the assignment (=) operator returns the value set.

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Name the function directly rather than create an anonymous one to assign to a variable. You may also assign this function as the .change() handler without the extra wrapper function:

(function checkForUnitReferred() {
    $("#LeadForm").toggle($("#Claim_UnitReferredNoNull").is(":checked"));
})();

$("#Claim_UnitReferredNoNull").change(checkForUnitReferred);
share|improve this answer
    
Doesn't work for me, works on page load but the change event is not firing. –  Jimmy Jan 7 '11 at 14:49
    
@lonesomeday: Actually there is no hoisting here: the parentheses ensure that the function is parsed as a named function expression rather than a function declaration. That being the case, this has its own problems in IE and should probably be avoided: kangax.github.com/nfe –  Tim Down Jan 7 '11 at 15:26
    
@Tim Gah, thanks. Removed my incorrect comment. –  lonesomeday Jan 7 '11 at 15:27
    
@Tim, thanks for the link, I stand corrected. Although because of the bugs in IE, it's the only browser this works in. –  Box9 Jan 7 '11 at 22:25
    
you're absolutely right. –  Tim Down Jan 8 '11 at 13:04
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